Stud removal tool experience

Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Messages
1,618
Location
Flatlands of Indiana
Rebuilding a Honda 750 motorcycle engine and need to remove the cylinder studs to install heavy duty studs. some of these are 1 foot long. They neck down to 6mm diameter. I'll be attaching the tool down low, on the smooth part of the stud, near where they enter the engine case. Does anybody have any experience with these? http://www.amazon.com/OTC-Metric-Stud-Re...customerReviews I don't want to be a hack and put vice grips on these in the event they are froze and I have to stick with them.
 
Joined
Jun 25, 2014
Messages
2,648
Location
IL
Just take two nuts, or several and screw them together on the stud, jam them against each other, then remove threaded stud.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 30, 2007
Messages
17,501
Location
Clovis, CA
These are the ones I've used. You thread the collet onto the stud, then you thread the housing onto the collet. You need two wrenches to do it. It's absolutely fool proof. It works extremely well and there's no chance of damaging the stud threads. They're very pricy, so I'd recommend buying the single size collet you need along with the matching housing. The housing works on several of the collets, so you'd only have to buy the housing once.
 
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Messages
409
Location
Tampa, Florida
Originally Posted By: Merkava_4
These are the ones I've used. You thread the collet onto the stud, then you thread the housing onto the collet. You need two wrenches to do it. It's absolutely fool proof. It works extremely well and there's no chance of damaging the stud threads. They're very pricy, so I'd recommend buying the single size collet you need along with the matching housing. The housing works on several of the collets, so you'd only have to buy the housing once.
I have just such a set for sale: http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/3568649#Post3568649
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
64
Location
Upstate NY
The collets are nice but I have seen cases where even they did not work. They can turn on the threads like double nutting if the stud is stubborn enough. I had a Stahlwille set like the OTC ones and they worked very well. They even could be used on the threaded portion with minimal distortion of the threads. The nice thing about them is you can slide them all the way down longer studs and grip the stud close to the base threads.
 
Joined
Jan 30, 2007
Messages
17,501
Location
Clovis, CA
Originally Posted By: Fred_Garvin
The collets are nice but I have seen cases where even they did not work.
Were they specifically Snap-on made collets?
 

JetStar

Thread starter
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Messages
1,618
Location
Flatlands of Indiana
Thanks for the suggestions guys. Those threaded collet types are cool, but I'd be twisting on the end if a 6mm stud about a foot long, same for the double nut method. Have used the double nut method in the past, but for stubborn studs you can tear up the threads, not a big deal if you are going to replace the stud. These studs are notoriously soft, which is why I want to replace them. Will likely have to use some heat to get the aluminum to expand, and penetrant since these have been in place for 36 years.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2013
Messages
64
Location
Upstate NY
Yes even Snap On collets will turn on the threads. I have a select number of them but I rarely use them. The Stahlwille set is so much easier and quicker. If neither of these works it usually takes welding a nut to the base of the stud. Caterpillar exhaust studs were notorious for not coming out without a lot of work.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
Messages
27,017
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Originally Posted By: JetStar
Thanks for the suggestions guys. Those threaded collet types are cool, but I'd be twisting on the end if a 6mm stud about a foot long, same for the double nut method. Have used the double nut method in the past, but for stubborn studs you can tear up the threads, not a big deal if you are going to replace the stud. These studs are notoriously soft, which is why I want to replace them. Will likely have to use some heat to get the aluminum to expand, and penetrant since these have been in place for 36 years.
You need to get as close to the bottom of the stud as possible. Put a piece of thin brass tubing (Home Depot) over them and grab with vise grips as you slowly heat it. You can also try dry ice or cold spray on the stud after heating the aluminum to shock the connection loose then do the tubing and grips. http://www.amazon.com/Pac-Kit-13-050-Fir...Q0KDECJFB8F5P6N I remember having to use a lot of timeserts on the old 750 cam holders. Edit: Don't bother with the old style removers they don't work very well, i have one in my tool box for 30 years and it hasn't worked once yet on a stuck one. http://www.zoro.com/i/G2365072/?utm_sour...CFUEV7AodZE4Avg
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 20, 2003
Messages
141
Location
So. Cal
My old favorite is to heat the stud and put a candle to the threads. The wax will wick into the case around the threads
 

JetStar

Thread starter
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Messages
1,618
Location
Flatlands of Indiana
Thanks Trav. I had read about the cam holder threads. I have discovered that somebody had been in here before. Some re-surfacing will be in my future since somebody attacked the gasket surfaces with a dull cold chisel. Also, they drove something between the cylinder block and the crankcase to separate them. The only gasket surface that isn't buggered to bad is the crankcase, luckily. The ODO on the bike showed 17,000 miles and the bores measure almost new. I plan on splitting the case next week, I'm hoping that the surprises are restricted to the top end. I'm glad I decided to tear into the engine before building the bike around it. The engine has to come out of the bike just to remove the cam cover. I guess that explains the valve adjuster access plugs.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
Messages
27,017
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
That really suck when someone hacks the job like that. You might be able to fill the bad gouges with aluminum powder that is heated and melts into the gouges, then file them smooth. A jewelers torch works well for this job, you need about 1,000f to melt it but it fills well and takes the heat. Good bike though, the first affordable super bike. Yours with such low miles is really desirable.
 
Top