Shaeffer Oil beats others for my Honda 1.5 TDI 2018 Earth Dreams Engine......

SammyChevelleTypeS3

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Long / long time Honda Accord buyer (4th owned since 1997) and have 2 now. Since 2002 have always owned 2 at same time like now. Mine is 2009 Accord EXL (2.0 vetch engine) 167,000 mi, and wife has the 2018 Accord EXL (1.5 TDI engine) 65,000 mi. Been using Amsoil EX 5w20 in 2009 since day one. Started with Amsoil Signature 0w20 due to Honda TDI engine LSPI issues. Amsoil Signature is the highest rated preventive oil for the LSPI issues I could find. Used it and found that it turned dark really fast in the turbo (which is normal for a lot of oils in turbo service) but looked to change due to fuel in oil and rising level on dipstick. Never had used Shaeffer oil.
Switched to Shaeffer Supreme 9000 0w20 after reading about the company and oil make up. Ran Shaeffer thru a quick 3000mi session, drained and replaced filter and could see right away the oil was clearing up and level had stopped rising due to fuel getting into the oil. Did a 2nd 3000mi run. Oil looked so much better that I am now at 5500 miles and it is staying cleaner looking and no fuel detected thru rising dipstick level or gasoline smell when checking oil. I am going to stick with 0w20 Shaeffer 9000 Supreme oil for the 2018 Accord TDI engine and stay with my long time pattern of Amsoil EX 5w20 in the 2009 Accord 2.0 vtech engine. Neither of these oils are a problem for me to acquire. Order direct from both companies. Don't know why so many folks complain they cannot access these oils. If the Shaeffer oil had not stopped the LSPI / fuel in oil problem in the 2018 turbo I was all ready to trade it in. We like all the new design features of that Accord so we will keep it now.
 

SammyChevelleTypeS3

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WELCOME!
Glad you found your oil. I have my favorite(s) too although my oil choices are le$$ costly for my particular needs.
Our Civic seems to be happy on anything.
Love those Fire Bird Formula cars from the 70s all the way thru the late 80s... After selling my last Chevelle two years ago I was close to going after a clean "survivor or re-built" 77 thru 89 Fire Bird to use as a daily driver. Then at 64 yrs old, the increasing health issues brought me back to my senses. Hence I would still have one of my Chevelles. Just can't seem to stay off the classic car sales web sites trolling Pontiacs / Buicks and Chevy muscle cars... A few favorites of mine are the Buick Gran Sports, the Chevy Chevelle line, Ford / Mercury Torino Cobra & Cyclone Spoilers. One of my all time favorites is the Pontiac (one year only) 1977 Can Am LeMans Sport Coupes. I love ALL brands though. Not one of those "my brand is better than yours!" guys... Love all the old, real American steel this country created from the 60s thru 90s. A dead / dying American art form. Especially the late 70s Mopars which sell today for incredible "unobtainium prices."
 

SammyChevelleTypeS3

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I’m not exactly sure how a specific brand cures fuel dilution but hey.
Right. I am no scientist but know that oil and gas companies spend much time / money and research and development into creating their products they need us to buy and use. The answers may lay in the so called proprietary "additives" they put into their oils and fuels for very specific reasons.
 

Astro14

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So, the oil itself stopped fuel dilution?

Truly amazing.

No chance, I suppose, that the change of oil took place in a test that controlled for other variables; average trip length, idle time, seasonal temperature variation, driving style, or any other factor that might have an influence on fuel dilution?

No chance, I suppose, that an oil analysis, beyond smell and color, took place to validate this miraculous change?
 

4WD

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Well, perception is reality to some - and sometimes that’s me. I have a GDI engine and when it’s got 4k on the oil it smells like gasoline but looks full on the dipstick … Well, that’s not a graduated cylinder is it ?
I only know that I didn’t pour gasoline in the oil fill hole. I don’t know how much fuel it takes to thin motor oil - but suspect it’s not that much.
I used a very good oil in that motor - but no dilution delusions that my oil type can stop it 😷
 
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Long / long time Honda Accord buyer (4th owned since 1997) and have 2 now. Since 2002 have always owned 2 at same time like now. Mine is 2009 Accord EXL (2.0 vetch engine) 167,000 mi, and wife has the 2018 Accord EXL (1.5 TDI engine) 65,000 mi. Been using Amsoil EX 5w20 in 2009 since day one. Started with Amsoil Signature 0w20 due to Honda TDI engine LSPI issues. Amsoil Signature is the highest rated preventive oil for the LSPI issues I could find. Used it and found that it turned dark really fast in the turbo (which is normal for a lot of oils in turbo service) but looked to change due to fuel in oil and rising level on dipstick. Never had used Shaeffer oil.
Switched to Shaeffer Supreme 9000 0w20 after reading about the company and oil make up. Ran Shaeffer thru a quick 3000mi session, drained and replaced filter and could see right away the oil was clearing up and level had stopped rising due to fuel getting into the oil. Did a 2nd 3000mi run. Oil looked so much better that I am now at 5500 miles and it is staying cleaner looking and no fuel detected thru rising dipstick level or gasoline smell when checking oil. I am going to stick with 0w20 Shaeffer 9000 Supreme oil for the 2018 Accord TDI engine and stay with my long time pattern of Amsoil EX 5w20 in the 2009 Accord 2.0 vtech engine. Neither of these oils are a problem for me to acquire. Order direct from both companies. Don't know why so many folks complain they cannot access these oils. If the Shaeffer oil had not stopped the LSPI / fuel in oil problem in the 2018 turbo I was all ready to trade it in. We like all the new design features of that Accord so we will keep it now.
So can you further go and explain how exactly oil stopped fuel dilution?
 

4WD

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Right. I am no scientist but know that oil and gas companies spend much time / money and research and development into creating their products they need us to buy and use. The answers may lay in the so called proprietary "additives" they put into their oils and fuels for very specific reasons.
Can you explain your distrust of major oil companies ?
 

OVERKILL

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So, the oil itself stopped fuel dilution?

Truly amazing.

No chance, I suppose, that the change of oil took place in a test that controlled for other variables; average trip length, idle time, seasonal temperature variation, driving style, or any other factor that might have an influence on fuel dilution?

No chance, I suppose, that an oil analysis, beyond smell and color, took place to validate this miraculous change?
Indeed, or that the rising oil level being "cured" was the result of simply more of it now burning off....
 

SammyChevelleTypeS3

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Can you explain your distrust of major oil companies ?
Not at all because I have zero distrust of major oil companies. I just buy products that I test to see if they satisfy my needs. If they do and I can afford to , I continue to use them.
Indeed, or that the rising oil level being "cured" was the result of simply more of it now burning off....
Indeed, or that the rising oil level being "cured" was the result of simply more of it now burning off....
Thanks, now I recall why I do not participate in ANY other social media or twitter type of sites. I forgot there are people whose agenda seems to be sitting in wait to trash / attack and even attempt fights about comments. Enough ALREADY for me. Life is way too short to go thru life looking for fights when its a lot more fun to enjoy life and people with common interests and attitudes. I am NOT any type of oil rep or sales person and I could give a flying flip less what type of oils people want to fight and throw mud at each other about. I have 42 years experience in industrial maintenance that included pulling apart equipment to rebuild giant compressors and turbine engines that were required to run 24x7 almost 365 days a year or companies stood to lose millions of dollars a day. I worked with and learned from educated mechanical engineers whose job was to not only keep these machines running trouble free and to improve their reliability. These engineers were constantly testing and we were swapping different oils from one brand to another to accomplish their mission. So we stumbled across a "brand" that I will not even mention. We put this oil in the gear boxes on turbines that we were at the time forced/required to tear down and rebuild every 12 months due to main bearing wear. This was required every 12 months again even after cleaning, and either repairs or replacing and balancing shafts and drive gears and using Royal Purple oil. But once we switched to this other oil, supposedly identical weight and grade (only difference is the additives) we were able to extend those 12 month rebuilds and bearing swaps to 24 to 36 month because the bearings, shafts and gears still looked new when opened up. So - no magic took place I am aware of or missing oil level thru "burn off etc.." BUT something clearly improved. Some machines simply respond to and run better with different products. THE END. I am simply happy I found a product I like that seems to work for me and may possibly cause me less problems. Whoever on this site has the time and money to do all type of expensive oil testing and chemical research to prove one thing wrong or right , well be happy and knock yourselves out.
 

OVERKILL

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Not at all because I have zero distrust of major oil companies. I just buy products that I test to see if they satisfy my needs. If they do and I can afford to , I continue to use them.


Thanks, now I recall why I do not participate in ANY other social media or twitter type of sites. I forgot there are people whose agenda seems to be sitting in wait to trash / attack and even attempt fights about comments. Enough ALREADY for me. Life is way too short to go thru life looking for fights when its a lot more fun to enjoy life and people with common interests and attitudes. I am NOT any type of oil rep or sales person and I could give a flying flip less what type of oils people want to fight and throw mud at each other about. I have 42 years experience in industrial maintenance that included pulling apart equipment to rebuild giant compressors and turbine engines that were required to run 24x7 almost 365 days a year or companies stood to lose millions of dollars a day. I worked with and learned from educated mechanical engineers whose job was to not only keep these machines running trouble free and to improve their reliability. These engineers were constantly testing and we were swapping different oils from one brand to another to accomplish their mission. So we stumbled across a "brand" that I will not even mention. We put this oil in the gear boxes on turbines that we were at the time forced/required to tear down and rebuild every 12 months due to main bearing wear. This was required every 12 months again even after cleaning, and either repairs or replacing and balancing shafts and drive gears and using Royal Purple oil. But once we switched to this other oil, supposedly identical weight and grade (only difference is the additives) we were able to extend those 12 month rebuilds and bearing swaps to 24 to 36 month because the bearings, shafts and gears still looked new when opened up. So - no magic took place I am aware of or missing oil level thru "burn off etc.." BUT something clearly improved. Some machines simply respond to and run better with different products. THE END. I am simply happy I found a product I like that seems to work for me and may possibly cause me less problems. Whoever on this site has the time and money to do all type of expensive oil testing and chemical research to prove one thing wrong or right , well be happy and knock yourselves out.

Easy with the thin skin, don't post if you don't want feedback, that's the whole purpose of a forum. You provided an anecdote, people here questioned it, that's how this works. While it seems you are clearly unsatisfied with the exchange, I would suggest taking a breather and considering the below with a more levelled temper.

If, on the other hand, you want to actually have a discussion, then let's have one!

An oil won't solve a mechanical issue. Yes, better oils can decrease wear (per your 3rd party turbine observations). Better oils can result in things running cleaner. Better oils can do many things, but they can't stop mechanical issues.

Some examples:
- An oil can't prevent a defective lifter from failing
- An oil can't reduce enrichment level
- An oil cannot reduce IVD's once they are formed (but oil formulation can have an impact on IVD formation initially)
- An oil cannot prevent a lean condition
- An oil cannot stop fuel dilution as the result of an overly rich mixture or direct injection, particularly under boost

It's that last one you claim to have cured.

Provided an engine is well maintained (which it sounds like yours is), oil selection isn't going to dramatically alter ring seal or reduce fuel blowing by the rings in a direct injection application, this is because these are mechanical issues, the result of over-enrichment and the poor atomization obtained using DI, compounded by a pressurized air charge. While oil chemistry can impact LSPI, it isn't going to result in the amount of fuel being injected changing or significantly reduce how much gets by the rings due to boost and DI spray patterns.

That's WHY these questions and observations are being raised.

If you were to properly evaluate this, you cannot simply go by oil level or colour. You'd have to test, under identical driving conditions, both lubricants over a few OCI's and send those samples off to a lab that uses GC to get a proper measure of the amount of fuel making its way into the oil. That would tell you if the lube choice is having any impact on the amount of fuel making its way into the sump.

More oil or lighter fractions flashing off can, as I pointed out, make it appear as though the oil level isn't rising. @ARCOgraphite recently had a situation where all of a sudden his oil level dropped considerably, even though it had been "staying full". This was also in a TGDI engine. The result? He had made a long drive and it was fuel dilution that had kept the oil level steady and this evaporated when he got the oil hotter by modifying how the car was driven.

There are simply insufficient controls in place and data presented here to support the claim that the selection of what went in the sump has impacted the amount of fuel dilution happening.

This might not be the type of feedback you were looking for, but that's typically the type of feedback you are going to get here. While a nice "atta boy!" might have been more in-line with your expectations, the idea is that constructive feedback as to how to better evaluate what you think you experienced and to aide in producing substantiative data going forward is ultimately more beneficial.
 

SammyChevelleTypeS3

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So, the oil itself stopped fuel dilution?

Truly amazing.

No chance, I suppose, that the change of oil took place in a test that controlled for other variables; average trip length, idle time, seasonal temperature variation, driving style, or any other factor that might have an influence on fuel dilution?

No chance, I suppose, that an oil analysis, beyond smell and color, took place to validate this miraculous change?
Easy with the thin skin, don't post if you don't want feedback, that's the whole purpose of a forum. You provided an anecdote, people here questioned it, that's how this works. While it seems you are clearly unsatisfied with the exchange, I would suggest taking a breather and considering the below with a more levelled temper.

If, on the other hand, you want to actually have a discussion, then let's have one!

An oil won't solve a mechanical issue. Yes, better oils can decrease wear (per your 3rd party turbine observations). Better oils can result in things running cleaner. Better oils can do many things, but they can't stop mechanical issues.

Some examples:
- An oil can't prevent a defective lifter from failing
- An oil can't reduce enrichment level
- An oil cannot reduce IVD's once they are formed (but oil formulation can have an impact on IVD formation initially)
- An oil cannot prevent a lean condition
- An oil cannot stop fuel dilution as the result of an overly rich mixture or direct injection, particularly under boost

It's that last one you claim to have cured.

Provided an engine is well maintained (which it sounds like yours is), oil selection isn't going to dramatically alter ring seal or reduce fuel blowing by the rings in a direct injection application, this is because these are mechanical issues, the result of over-enrichment and the poor atomization obtained using DI, compounded by a pressurized air charge. While oil chemistry can impact LSPI, it isn't going to result in the amount of fuel being injected changing or significantly reduce how much gets by the rings due to boost and DI spray patterns.

That's WHY these questions and observations are being raised.

If you were to properly evaluate this, you cannot simply go by oil level or colour. You'd have to test, under identical driving conditions, both lubricants over a few OCI's and send those samples off to a lab that uses GC to get a proper measure of the amount of fuel making its way into the oil. That would tell you if the lube choice is having any impact on the amount of fuel making its way into the sump.

More oil or lighter fractions flashing off can, as I pointed out, make it appear as though the oil level isn't rising. @ARCOgraphite recently had a situation where all of a sudden his oil level dropped considerably, even though it had been "staying full". This was also in a TGDI engine. The result? He had made a long drive and it was fuel dilution that had kept the oil level steady and this evaporated when he got the oil hotter by modifying how the car was driven.

There are simply insufficient controls in place and data presented here to support the claim that the selection of what went in the sump has impacted the amount of fuel dilution happening.

This might not be the type of feedback you were looking for, but that's typically the type of feedback you are going to get here. While a nice "atta boy!" might have been more in-line with your expectations, the idea is that constructive feedback as to how to better evaluate what you think you experienced and to aide in producing substantiative data going forward is ultimately more beneficial.
 
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