Replacing themostat, radiator cap, and waterpump at a regular interval

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I was watching this video of some youtuber who suggest that we should considered replacing the radiator cap, thermostat, and water pump at some interval. He was suggesting that may be every 60K the radiator cap and thermostat should be replaced. The radiator cap because the seal breaks down and it no longer holds the pressure it used to. The thermostat may eventually failed. The water pump should be replace when you change timing belt. I do recall that in my first car, my thermostat seems to fail often resulting in overheat of the car and probably contributed to its demise. In the past, I always replace the water pump every timing belt change, but the Subaru dealer suggested that it wasn't really necessary since the water pump is quite robust. What do you think? Paul
 
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I think it depends on the use of the vehicle. I drive to Boston and inside 95/128 almost every day. The thermostat and cap would have to be replaced every two years, which is not realistic. I don't believe the cooling system is even in the regular maintenance book. Just oil and filter and rotations. I'd have to check the frequency in the owners manual.
 
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Originally Posted by Paul_Siu
I was watching this video of some youtuber who suggest that we should considered replacing the radiator cap, thermostat, and water pump at some interval. He was suggesting that may be every 60K the radiator cap and thermostat should be replaced. The radiator cap because the seal breaks down and it no longer holds the pressure it used to. The thermostat may eventually failed. The water pump should be replace when you change timing belt. I do recall that in my first car, my thermostat seems to fail often resulting in overheat of the car and probably contributed to its demise. In the past, I always replace the water pump every timing belt change, but the Subaru dealer suggested that it wasn't really necessary since the water pump is quite robust. What do you think? Paul
60k seems too often to me. But I am not fully against preemptive replacement. However, if I have an OEM water pump doing fine I probably wouldn't preemptively replace with aftermarket. Just my opinion.
 
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Originally Posted by Paul_Siu
I was watching this video of some youtuber who suggest that we should considered replacing the radiator cap, thermostat, and water pump at some interval. He was suggesting that may be every 60K the radiator cap and thermostat should be replaced. The radiator cap because the seal breaks down and it no longer holds the pressure it used to. The thermostat may eventually failed. The water pump should be replace when you change timing belt. I do recall that in my first car, my thermostat seems to fail often resulting in overheat of the car and probably contributed to its demise. In the past, I always replace the water pump every timing belt change, but the Subaru dealer suggested that it wasn't really necessary since the water pump is quite robust. What do you think? Paul
Not so much vehicle specific but in reality a car is no different than any other machine in terms of your question. Assuming a properly assembled part ( whatever it is) and properly matched function ( part specifications are within range of the actual application it has to function in regardless of the parent machine) then there is no legitimate "engineering" answer to this. Boiled down there are 2 basic reasons for this. Since the parts are different in construction, design and purpose ( and often exposed to different areas of a machine which means the exposed stresses are different as well)- their "wear" cant be correlated in any legitimate manner. Then is the scale to determine the frequency.. In reality most scales ( hour meter, odometer etc.) are measuring a frequency which is seldom directly relative to the stressors that contribute to the degradation of the component. ( more of a scheduling tool rather than an indicator of loss of performance) It boils down to risk ( actual, perceived or set value) the individual sets for his equipment based on his circumstances on what level is acceptable. Then that risk is qualified as to the skills, level of maintenance and so forth that specific individual has or is willing to invest in. Its really in the eye of the beholder. Personally when I repair something ( mine or client machinery) I always propose at a minimum to inspect/repair the entire function ( or system) to the proper level because I have often found that introducing a "new' part in a uniformly worn system will often become the failure mechanism for the next weakest link.
 
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Has anyone notice when you drain and refill coolant and dont change the thermostat, the coolant temperature gauge will show the temperature is slightly lower than before?
 
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I prefer to keep a close watch drips indicating a seal failure and also keep an eye on the temp. An infra red temp gun is a useful devise to check it. Once past 200,000 miles it is tempting to do a proactive change but so far I have not done it. smile
 
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Originally Posted by painfx
Has anyone notice when you drain and refill coolant and dont change the thermostat, the coolant temperature gauge will show the temperature is slightly lower than before?
No.
 

gathermewool

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Originally Posted by HowAboutThis
Originally Posted by painfx
Has anyone notice when you drain and refill coolant and dont change the thermostat, the coolant temperature gauge will show the temperature is slightly lower than before?
No.
+1 No.
 
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Originally Posted by painfx
Has anyone notice when you drain and refill coolant and dont change the thermostat, the coolant temperature gauge will show the temperature is slightly lower than before?
Considering how most temperature gauges operate and also how the thermostat is constructed to a specific set point, no. How's New Jersey?
 
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Most likely explanation is that it wasn't completely full to work at its best before draining.
 
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They do not have to be replaced at regular intervals, but if your car has a timing belt, you should replace the water pump along with it since the WP is often driven by the TB I'd replace the radiator cap when replacing the radiator.
 
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I think that replacing the T-stat every 60K miles is a preemptive move and IMO a wise one, as just to test it you have to remove it, so one might just as well change it. The rad cap can be tested easily enough and changed when needed. The water pump, depending on location, but it ought to be changed either when one changes the timing belt or, if a chain, whenever it states so in the owner's manual.
 
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Where do you draw the line with preventative maintenance (replacement of working parts) ? Replace the starter at 100k miles ? All four wheel bearings at "x" miles ?
 
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Change your coolant at the correct time (perhaps a little bit early) and you most likely won't need to replace parts. At least not at 60,000 miles.
 
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I change the cap and 'stat every 10 years. OEM parts only. Since I'm a weekend and road trip driver it's about 50,000 miles.
 

Paul_Siu

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Originally Posted by hallstevenson
Where do you draw the line with preventative maintenance (replacement of working parts) ? Replace the starter at 100k miles ? All four wheel bearings at "x" miles ?
I think this may be a case of factoring in the consequences. A starter if it fails will failed to start the motor, which may strand you somewhere. For most people, this would not be an issue. But if you live some place where this would put you at risk, then replace. In the case of things like timing belt and water pump and thermostat, these are things that can damage the engine and so may be worth getting just as a preventive measure. The radiator cap is also probably belong to the category of being easy and cheap to replace. Paul
 
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Thermostats wear out at different rates on different models. Saturn s-series blow them all the time, but it's the internal rubber seal that goes, and they wind up underheating, a fail-safe way to go. I would not change them for no reason, as the quality of new ones is all over the place. One should watch their OBD data stream to see if their stats are "sticky" within the gauge dead zone, though. A little movement is normal, which is why they deadened the gauge.
 
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Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
Has anyone notice when you drain and refill coolant and dont change the thermostat, the coolant temperature gauge will show the temperature is slightly lower than before?
Considering how most temperature gauges operate and also how the thermostat is constructed to a specific set point, no. How's New Jersey?
I asked because I see most Hondas have this problem after changing the coolant. Temp gauge is slightly lower. My friend recently changed his coolant and also had this problem. Although the COVID is not really getting any better here. Just praying it will be over soon. Thank you for asking. smile
 
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