oxygen sensor quality oem vs. others (Napa, Autozone, Fram)?

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Apr 22, 2005
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oklahoma city, ok
I'm looking at getting a new oxygen sensor for my ford because I don't know how long the current one has been on there for. Is there any real difference in the Motorcraft oxygen sensor for $70 vs. the Napa or Autozone for $30 to $40? Has anyone had expericance with aftermarket sensors? What brands have been good for you?
 
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Aug 12, 2002
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CT
I don't think Motorcraft (Ford) manufacturers O2 sensors, thing to do would be to look at one over the dealer's parts counter and find out who really makes it. Then make somewhat of an informed decision on how good an 'aftermarket' one would be. I don't know the exact science behind them, but they can't be too different I'd imagine- kinda like a spark plug.
 
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Jan 31, 2005
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The upstream O2 sensor I just put on my wife's '01 Grand Caravan was a Denso in a Bosch box. It said Denso on the side bigger than life.
 
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Lake Anna, VA
I've used Bosch from Autozone in a few applications with no problems. Very well made and allready came with antisieze on the threads. No apparent design differences from the OEM ones I have taken out.
 
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I've used NTK (NGK) sensors that seem to be better quality than bosch aftermarket sensors. bosch OEM and bosch aftermarket parts are not always the same part.
 
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Every single Ford OEM oxygen sensor that I've seen has been an NTK sensor. Every single Standard Motor Products (SMP) oxygen sensor I've ordered for Ford vehicles has been an NTK sensor. Rockauto.com sells SMP oxygen sensors. Bosch sensors work fine too. As far as Denso: The only oxygen sensor heater failure I've ever seen happened to a Denso sensor on a 1997 Honda Del Sol. That's right, the heater failed and went open-circuit. Doesn't make me think that Denso oxygen sensors are real high-quality pieces, but it could be an isolated failure.
 

Jay

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My Acura RSX has two oxygen sensors, one upstream and one downsteam of the CAT--both very expensive. I think they're expensive because they react to changes very quickly. The ECU can detect misfires on an individual cylinder, and the only way I can figure that it does this is by a very fast acting oxygen sensor.
 
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Dec 22, 2002
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The Garden State
I replaced the factory Ford O2 sensor in my 4 cyl Contour with a Bosch unit from Advance Auto for a good deal less than the dealer was charging. The physical appearance was different than the factory Ford one but it works great. My drivability has improved overall. It was not bad before but it's much better now [Smile] . Get the removal tool. It's not the same as the installation tool. It's thick and short. I found one for $10 at Pep Boys. Snap-On tools wanted $30+ for their's. While I'm sure their's is real good but for the ocassional user the Pep-Boys one is fine. It worked for me [Wink] . Whimnsey
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Whimsey: .....4 cyl Contour ... Get the removal tool. It's not the same as the installation tool...
Geez... talk about specialized..
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Jay: The ECU can detect misfires on an individual cylinder, and the only way I can figure that it does this is by a very fast acting oxygen sensor.
The way Ford ECUs (and probably most others) detect individual cylinder misfires is by sensing the minute deceleration of the crankshaft which occurs when that happens, using the crankshaft position sensor. Making this work reliabily in manual-transmission vehicles (in particular, false misfires were detected on rough roads) apparently was difficult enough that there was speculation that some automakers might drop the manual version of their cars when OBD-II was mandated.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Jay: My Acura RSX has two oxygen sensors, one upstream and one downsteam of the CAT--both very expensive. I think they're expensive because they react to changes very quickly. The ECU can detect misfires on an individual cylinder, and the only way I can figure that it does this is by a very fast acting oxygen sensor.
by the sparkplug firing voltage.
 
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Feb 9, 2005
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Arizona
It also uses sparkplug voltage (in the SAAB applications, anyway) to provide feedback about the conditions in the combustion chamber/cylinder during the power stroke (perhaps the exhaust stroke as well; I do not know about that). This allows no knock sensor on at least some engines, and supposedly allows mixture fine-tuning and perhaps feedback about boost levels.
 
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