Ordered a Mityvac MV8000 Brake/Clutch bleeding kit and questions.

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Im probably more excited than I should be over this :LOL: but it was never on my radar until an Amazon suggestion product pops up under "you might like". Reviews are positive, seems simple enough to operate, price I was thinking every Mityvac was hundreds - was extremely reasonable at under 50 dollars for everything.

I like to flush the brake fluid every 2 years and the clutch every year. Its around $129 at the dealer for the brake fluid flush and $89 for the clutch fluid flush. The Sonata is coming up on another full system brake bleed and the Forte also needs a correct bleed as I only gravity bled when I replaced the calipers so this Mityvac should do a fine job.

Anyone have tips tricks ect on making this as painless as possible? What is the "correct" sequence when bleeding brakes? I think I would start at the wheel furthest away from master cylinder - then alternate? Both vehicles have ABS, traction/stability control, electronic brake distribution but that's about it.. Its been so many years that I honestly don't remember. I am using Dot 3 synthetic 50K mile like fluid as that's what the cars came with new.
Thanks :)
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Don't know what year yr car is, but in newer vehicles one has to put the brake system in service-mode before doing anything, this is VERY IMPORTANT. If not you're heading for problems with functions & Codes and may even stop the operation from being done properly.
 
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I've gotta get a new Mityvac. My old one lasted 20 years till it finally broke.

BTW
Brake fluid is and has always been a SYNTHETIC.
I find it amusing that companies put it on the container. Maybe so that the customers will know?
Most people that I speak with think that there is a conventional brake fluid & a synthetic brake fluid.
 
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I have had a Mityvac for some twenty years. The original ones were diecast metal; said units are still likely also available... I have a 1 quart Mason's jar, and I can pull ~27-1/2" Hg vacuum. If possible, I remove the bleedscrews (while plugging the threaded hole in the caliper with a gloved finger) and I have someone wrap a folded-over length of Teflon tape, say two turns worth, over the thread portion (and NOT the seat portion) of a bleedscrew... to NOT allow as much bypass air to make its way into my Mason's jar (depleting my vacuum so quickly). In practice I buy one extra bleedscrew per end of the car (sometimes they're different, frt vers rear) so I can prepare my Teflon tape wrapped bleedscrew, prior. I have a valve in my clear plastic tubing so I can pump up the system, prior. Works well for me. See pix.
 

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Whatever you do, be really circumspect about NOT letting the reservoir run dry. Also, carefully use a turkey baster to first remove and replace the fluid in the reservoir with fresh fluid. Then you end up coursing nominally-fresh fluid thru as the flushing media.
 
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One warning I would offer concerns the notion of removing a bleedscrew fully, to wrap the two turns of folded-over teflon tape 'round the threaded portion: on a vehicle that has been in service for a while, I have had difficulty in re-inserting the bleedscrew... Easy to crossthread... I could of course lessen the turns of Teflon tape. I did... and then ultimately tried zero Teflon tape. Still had trouble. I would say that for a vehicle that's been in service for a while, well, maybe do NOT do this...
 
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I have one of these and it works pretty well. The rubber piece that goes over the bleeder isn’t the tightest fit and there are air bubbles going down the clear tube to the reservoir. However, I did my 2017 accord and her 15 Altima and both had the bubbles in the tube as it was going into the reservoir but both have vehicles have been fine since I did them.

Only real downside is the small reservoir, it fills up quick

I was just using the plastic bottle method (one person method) and didn’t have no issues but just wanted to try the mityvac
 
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I don't change fluids on a time only based interval, my vehicles are BITOG maintained....Currently, I'm using Bosch Esi6 fluid, which advertises a 100% longer service life than Dot 3 https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.php?pk=11727065 Additionally, I use Phoenix brake fluid test strips https://www.brakebleeder.com/product-category/brake-fluid-testing/ As of this writing, my wife's car brake fluid is going on 4 years old and only has 30 ppm copper, looks amber, etc. I'm not changing it out simply because it's "time." It's still perfectly serviceable. (She has put less than 10K on the car and it sits in a heated garage). Of course, my driving habits, environmental conditions, overnight parking, etc., may be VERY different from yours, hence YMMV.
BTW, Speed bleeders are the bomb; I put them on any (new to me) vehicle I obtain, along with a dab of nickel anti-seize on the threads. I fought with seized and twisted off bleeders for the last time many years ago and those are bad memories. Stainless speed bleeders and nickel anti-seize (speed bleeders are 11mm wrench size) and your (stainless) bleeders won't seize if you go off road, bury them in mud and then let them sit for a couple years. http://www.speedbleeder.com/
Finally, I use a Motive Power Bleeder (which pressurizes the Master Cylinder), and I LOVE IT. When I bleed brakes, I can do it myself, unassisted, and the pedal will be as good or better than if a stealership had done it. My (worthless) opinion is that you will LOVE your bleeder, and the fondness will grow after you've used it a few times.
 

1 SX

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Don't know what year yr car is, but in newer vehicles one has to put the brake system in service-mode before doing anything, this is VERY IMPORTANT. If not you're heading for problems with functions & Codes and may even stop the operation from being done properly.
It does not appear there is a service mode. the FSM shows a basic 2 person bleed procedure.

Screen Shot 2022-09-25 at 6.08.33 AM.jpg
Screen Shot 2022-09-25 at 6.08.02 AM.jpg

And this is the correct sequence: (1)right rear, (2)front left, (3)left rear, (4)front right.
 
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It does not appear there is a service mode. the FSM shows a basic 2 person bleed procedure.

View attachment 118364 View attachment 118365
And this is the correct sequence: (1)right rear, (2)front left, (3)left rear, (4)front right.
The online service manual I use for my Kia Soul has the instructions for ABS bleed right below the instructions for regular bleeding like yours above. You need a scan tool that can do abs bleeding, but I think you’ll be fine as long as you don’t get any air into the system, so make sure the reservoir stays full.
 

1 SX

Thread starter
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The online service manual I use for my Kia Soul has the instructions for ABS bleed right below the instructions for regular bleeding like yours above. You need a scan tool that can do abs bleeding, but I think you’ll be fine as long as you don’t get any air into the system, so make sure the reservoir stays full.
I mean I was happy with the pedal feel after gravity bleeding haha. But I feel like its not the "right" way to bleed brakes.
 
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