Oil in HOT climate and blending

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4
I have read a lot of previous posts about blending engine oils. All I have read pertains to climates that go thru cold winter seasons, while here in Scottsdale, AZ, the lowest temps go no lower than 30F maybe a handful of days during our winter months, and summer can see 117F at times. Keep in mind that these landmark temps on either end are only registered for a few hours during daylight for highs and eves for lows. My question is a bit different than most. I am not trying to pretend to be an oil engineer with the idea of mixing different weights for the sake of trying it out. I just bought a different car, a 2012 Hyundai Genesis R-Spec with a 429hp V-8 for power. It has not used a drop in 3000 miles. The maintenance manual lists a small variety of suggested weight oils based on temperature. It calls for 5w20 or 5w30...OR 10w30 if temps are above 0F. My temps will never be close to 0F, so I think the 10w30 is the way to go. I know the prev owner put 5w20 in it just before my purchase and is full syn. The valve train looks spotless with the filler cap off. It has 82K miles. That being said, the next oil change is coming up and I have 3.5 quarts of 5w30 Pennzoil Platinum High Mileage Full Syn on the shelf left over. The capacity on Genesis is 7 1/8 quarts. I want to use the remaining 3.5 qts of 5w30, then add another 3.5qts of 10w30. Or do you recommend to just go with 5w30 all in for the upcoming change and switch to the 10w30 the following time?
I am using this brand because of its low evap rates which is a consideration with these GDI engines. Also thinking about adding one or two catch cans. I am a past AMSOIL fan, using their extended use for up to 22K miles in my BMWs and never had a problem with burning oil or engine problems running them up to 300k miles. But at nearly $10/qt, and these newer engines, I am not so sure if I want to continue that process. Th economy makes a ton of sense with long durations, so the cost per quart really is not a factor when saving money and time. Anyway, feel free to comment on my original question. Thanks. Just joined but have been reading/lurking for a while! Keith
 
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2,109
Location
South Carolina
Unless you are trying to start your car in -40F Winter or you have a cooling system problem, your engine doesn't care what outside temperature you run your car in. It has a thermostatically controlled system that can operate in the 190F to 220F range. The answer is you can use the 5w-20, 5w-30 or 10w-30 oil in your engine where you live. BTW: you are mixing oil not blending oil which I am apposed to.
 
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15,847
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...
It’s a whole lot warmer inside that engine than it ever will be in Arizona. Your cooling system is the bigger key here. Run what the manufacturer recommends. Don’t try to out guess the engineers.
 

blupupher

Site Donor 2021
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6,818
Location
Katy, Republic of Texas
Won't make a difference either way.
If it were me, I would just buy more 5w-30 for the next change.
After that, flip a coin.
I am using Pennzoil Platinum 10w-30 in my Santa Fe with the 3.3 v6 just because I found a bunch on clearance.
Once that is gone, I will be going to 5w-30.
Why, because all my vehicles can use that weight, so it will be all I keep in stock.
 

KeithinAZ

Thread starter
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4
Pennzoil has low evap rates?🤣
The latest chart I read showed Amsoil and Pennzoil Ultra Plat had the two lowest evap rates. I am very interested in this with the GDI engines and crankcase venting back into the engine and loading up the backside of the intake valves with carbon as a result of evaporation.. This is my first non port inj engine. If you know of a better oil for low evap, let me know! TY
 
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1,625
Location
VA
I would go ahead and mix the 5-30 with whatever oil you plan to use next, to simplify changes with this odd capacity. That will leave you just over 1 quart in a 5-quart jug, which can be used for that 1/8 quart on future changes.

Not saying the designs are comparable, but I have been mixing Mobil 1 5-30 with 1-2 quarts of various 0/5-40 oils for the better part of 20 years in a 6-quart Chevy 5.3.
 
Messages
386
Location
MD
The latest chart I read showed Amsoil and Pennzoil Ultra Plat had the two lowest evap rates. I am very interested in this with the GDI engines and crankcase venting back into the engine and loading up the backside of the intake valves with carbon as a result of evaporation.. This is my first non port inj engine. If you know of a better oil for low evap, let me know! TY

I don't buy into marketing but I know for sure that Pennzoil burns like crazy (PUP and PP) in my experience and in my applications. All the BS charts and compared and versus is pure marketing to race with competitions. I would stick to Mobil1 from now on.
 

KeithinAZ

Thread starter
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4
I don't buy into marketing but I know for sure that Pennzoil burns like crazy (PUP and PP) in my experience and in my applications. All the BS charts and compared and versus is pure marketing to race with competitions. I would stick to Mobil1 from now on.
Please forgive my ignorance and tell me the definition of PP and PUP. And tell me where independant oil analysis relative to evaporative properties is honestly reported. Thanks, man.
 

KeithinAZ

Thread starter
Messages
4
I agree with Pim Tac above. Run the manufacture suggest oil and keep the cooling system in top condition. Ed
Yes! I agree, but I understand that oils are not all the same relative to their evaporative properties, and that is important to GDI engines like mine as well as timely changes. Thanks..
 
Messages
386
Location
MD
Please forgive my ignorance and tell me the definition of PP and PUP. And tell me where independant oil analysis relative to evaporative properties is honestly reported. Thanks, man.

PP=Pennzoil Platinum
PUP=Pennzoil Ultra Platinum

Many official channels don't report evaporative loss values unless oils are meant to satisfy european requirements (euro oils) since these are parts of the certificates they carry.

See pqia.org

Lots of independent oil sample analyses. And check out the used and virgin oil analysis sections in this forum.
 
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1,629
Location
Caldwell Idaho
The latest chart I read showed Amsoil and Pennzoil Ultra Plat had the two lowest evap rates. I am very interested in this with the GDI engines and crankcase venting back into the engine and loading up the backside of the intake valves with carbon as a result of evaporation.. This is my first non port inj engine. If you know of a better oil for low evap, let me know! TY









Blow by far surpasses oil evaporation and is dirty in comparison..
 
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