*NEW* DELO 600 ADF

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99
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SC
I think the predominant thought is that this oil was probably not suitable for everyone and was probably designed with some next gen engine in mind.
 
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1,409
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Gone Fishing
if u need it for your application, use, change it on time and move on. its not rocket science any oil that meets what you need will work. do u have a specific question?
 
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1,454
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South Carolina
I feel like they may be using Molyvan 855 in a pretty high concentration to make up the anti-wear. I can't wait to see how it does in Sequence IVA. That'll be the real test.
 
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583
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Alaska and Wisconsin
It's a new CK-4 rated diesel engine oil... Given its radically different chemistry, I wonder how it is going to be measured against other HDEOs up to this point? Anyone care to comment? Should be interesting!
 
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2,556
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wv
Originally Posted by SteveG4
It's a new CK-4 rated diesel engine oil... Given its radically different chemistry, I wonder how it is going to be measured against other HDEOs up to this point? Anyone care to comment? Should be interesting!
When CK-4 first came out everyone hoarded up CJ4 because of the lower ZDDP...and the fear that engine wear would increase. Now there is an oil with no zddp.. So it begins again.
 
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1,056
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WV
They are reducing SA .6% to reduce DPF clogging. Is that a problem and how widespread is it??? I don't hear about it from the trucking industry. They used a lot of CJ oil with DPF's. Like to hear from those in the trucking industry.
 
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583
Location
Alaska and Wisconsin
Originally Posted by krismoriah72
Originally Posted by SteveG4
It's a new CK-4 rated diesel engine oil... Given its radically different chemistry, I wonder how it is going to be measured against other HDEOs up to this point? Anyone care to comment? Should be interesting!
When CK-4 first came out everyone hoarded up CJ4 because of the lower ZDDP...and the fear that engine wear would increase. Now there is an oil with no zddp.. So it begins again.
Cannot argue that! Most of us fear change. Though it appears that Chevron has been working on this new oil for several (many) years. I'm sure NDA's were signed early on, and that engine and truck mfgrs haven't been left out of the loop. We'll find out soon enough I suppose.
 
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833
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AR
Originally Posted by loneryder
They are reducing SA .6% to reduce DPF clogging. Is that a problem and how widespread is it??? I don't hear about it from the trucking industry. They used a lot of CJ oil with DPF's. Like to hear from those in the trucking industry.
DPF systems are not anymore a 'problem', but they are a high expense.... to have them, cost of parts, engineering etc. to maintain them, DPF regen cycles (more fuel burned, lost power, nevermind the idiocy of burning more fuel to burn off the residue of burned fuel) breakdowns from them and their systems Anything that can minimize DPF regens etc should be a welcome development.....whether this is it....we'll see i guess.
 

dnewton3

Staff member
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8,459
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Indianapolis, IN
Originally Posted by BillyE
This has nothing to do with regens.
Actually, it does, per this article where Chevron reps made specific indications regarding regens and DPFs https://www.trucknews.com/transportation/chevron-unveils-a-lubricants-game-changer/1003095061/ If this lube product, along with things like FBCs (fuel borne catalysts) aimed at reducing PM (particulate matter) from the combustion process, all work towards lowering the ash and soot content in the exhaust stream, they could induce a significant improvement in reduced regen cycles. That in turn has implications such as greater fuel savings, and also the potential to make the DPF smaller (lighter and less costly) for any given expectation of performance and lifespan.
 
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273
Location
A Highway Near You
Anything to help with DPF lifespan and operational improvements is very welcome news. I wonder if the current Delo CK-4 oils were a bit of a test bed given the lower metallic additive levels they have. Either way, it appears Chevron has figured out something new to provide what diesel engines need without traditional chemistry. Will be watching closely for fleet test results when they happen.
 
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273
Location
A Highway Near You
Originally Posted by loneryder
They are reducing SA .6% to reduce DPF clogging. Is that a problem and how widespread is it??? I don't hear about it from the trucking industry. They used a lot of CJ oil with DPF's. Like to hear from those in the trucking industry.
Full on clogging isn't widespread, but excessive active re-gens that waste fuel are a problem for most, and these can be a restricted DPF and usually get blamed on something else operator based (excessive idling etc) to prevent any kind of warranty claim. Not having to remove the DPF for a mid life clean and bake (which Chevron claims may not be needed) is a cost saving as well.
 
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99
Location
SC
Originally Posted by dnewton3
Originally Posted by BillyE
This has nothing to do with regens.
Actually, it does, per this article where Chevron reps made specific indications regarding regens and DPFs https://www.trucknews.com/transportation/chevron-unveils-a-lubricants-game-changer/1003095061/
I don't mean to belabor this point, but that article does not mention regens or soot. The article talks about plugging from ash and increasing the service life of the DPF. That's the impact that can be attributed to the oil. You can't possibly burn enough oil to contribute to soot in any meaningful way. Ash on the other hand is not removed in DPF regeneration and builds over hundreds of thousands of miles.
 

dnewton3

Staff member
Messages
8,459
Location
Indianapolis, IN
Originally Posted by BillyE
Originally Posted by dnewton3
Originally Posted by BillyE
This has nothing to do with regens.
Actually, it does, per this article where Chevron reps made specific indications regarding regens and DPFs https://www.trucknews.com/transportation/chevron-unveils-a-lubricants-game-changer/1003095061/
I don't mean to belabor this point, but that article does not mention regens or soot. The article talks about plugging from ash and increasing the service life of the DPF. That's the impact that can be attributed to the oil. You can't possibly burn enough oil to contribute to soot in any meaningful way. Ash on the other hand is not removed in DPF regeneration and builds over hundreds of thousands of miles.
DPFs clog with PM (particulate matter); that is comprised of soot and ash. The regen cycles are generated by the dP (pressure drop) across the DPF filter. The more clogged it is, the more restrictive it becomes, and therefore the more often the system will call for a regen cycle. And I quote from the article: "Delo 600 ADF significantly reduces the rate of DPF clogging, extending DPF service life by up to 2.5 times, and bringing a 3% fuel economy retention advantage over the life of the equipment, delivering significant savings to customers." Now I quote myself from a previous post: "If this lube product, along with things like FBCs (fuel borne catalysts) aimed at reducing PM (particulate matter) from the combustion process, all work towards lowering the ash and soot content in the exhaust stream, they could induce a significant improvement in reduced regen cycles." I never said that the new lube will reduce soot. I said that if the new lube is combined with the use of a FBC, the two together would reduce both ash AND soot. (the lube reduces ash; the FBC reduces soot). Both conditions (less ash, less soot) are beneficial in that they clog the DPF at lower contamination rates. Less contamination means fewer regens. I might agree with you that regens do not burn away ash. But regens are initiated by the dP across the filter, and when there is less ash present, there is less clogging, and therefore lower dP; hence less regens. You imply that the new lube will not reduce regens. According to the article, that is untrue. And the reason it's untrue is because less ash (a key characteristic of the new lube) will mean less clogging of the DPF, which has the effect of fewer regens. In short, I agree with you that the new lube will not reduce soot; it does, however, reduce ash. I disagree with you that the new lube will not reduce regens, because ash IS a contributor to DPF clogging, and therefore less ash has the effect of less regens, and Chevron clearly has the information stated in that manner. The reduced regens (due to less ash) have resulted in lifecycle improvements of 2.5x, and less fuel consumption (3%; primarily because of less fuel burned due to fewer regens). NOTE: they even call it "3% fuel economy retention". Why "retention"? Because that fuel economy loss is associated directly to the fuel burned in the regen cycle. Less ash = fewer regens = better retained fuel economy.
 
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Messages
99
Location
SC
My point is that Chevron is not making a claim as to fewer DPF regenerations. Your point is that in the event of DPF plugging failure, more regenerations may be initiated by the ECM. I understand that but instead I look at it as this new oil is purported to allow a longer life of the DPF before this happens. This is also how Chevron has phrased it. The reason I'm choosing to say it this way is that an oil change to this new oil cannot by itself change the regen cycle to any significant extent. It probably will change the regen cycle after you have run the oil for dozens of OCIs and have not serviced the DPF. I guess I started from the assumption that the DPF would be serviced according to the manufacturer recommendations, which are generally specified at an interval so as to not impact performance (regens or otherwise). This oil would allow the manufacturer to extend that DPF service interval, or possibly allow for a redesign of the DPF unit itself. However you want to state it, do we agree that a single oil change with this new oil will not have any significant impact on fuel economy or regen cycle, within that single OCI?
 
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