Neo oil?

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1
Location
Houston
Anyone familiar with Neo oil? Would it be a good oil for use in normal daily driving puncuated by an occasional autocross event (timed solo II racing)? it would be changed fairly often The car is a '98 BMW M3 thanks
 
Messages
263
Location
San Diego, CA
I've been wondering the same thing, actually. Although i haven't seen a UOA or much of anything about it. Molekule, quick question about diesters. You mentioned that diesters were less thermally stable than polyol esters, but is there any advantage to diesters? Seems everything in the world has tradeoffs, so i would imagine that diesters would have SOMETHING better than POE, right? ferb!
 
Messages
12
Location
Delaware
Diesters may give better boundary layer lubrication since they can pack onto the metal surface more efficiently. The diesters are a bit more linear rather than the spherical shape of most polyolesters (remember the liquid ball bearings from Castrol?). The linear molecules will be able to stand up like the bristles on a brush and can provide a denser oil layer on the metal surface. Of course in a formulated lubricant system the additives are also competing for the metal surface as well. Diesters will also be less stable around moisture and heat than polyolesters.
 

MolaKule

Staff member
Messages
21,588
Location
Iowegia - USA
"Molekule, quick question about diesters. You mentioned that diesters were less thermally stable than polyol esters, but is there any advantage to diesters?" Advantages are higher flash points, lower pour point, lower temperature pumpability, and wider VI than mineral oils and PAO's. They are generally available with low viscosities and range from 1.2 to 4.1 cSt at 100 C. 2-ethylhexyl sebacate and 2-ethylhexyl adipate are the most popular diesters for engine lubricant formulations. Diesters are less thermally stable than the polyol esters of PE and DPE.
 
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