More old trucks than old cars still on the road?

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Many people only use their trucks every couple months or so for dump runs and whatnot so that keeps a lot of mileage off of them. They are more of a tool than a flashy daily driver that people trade in every couple years or get totaled over minor damage
 
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Market (i.e., perceived) value of cars depends on styling fashion and on whether they have trendy whistles and bells. Therefore fundamentally sound but aging cars tend not to be repaired.
Market value of trucks depends more on functionality, so aging ones are worth keeping on the road.
 
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I bet a bunch of our 15 year old Corollas get exported to somewhere that will really appreciate them for years to come.
Yep. In Texas they are sent to Mexico by the truckload (and by towing caravans) where they can be "reconditioned" very cheaply and resold.
 

Avery4

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Great points! I suspect the answer depends a lot on where someone lives. I live in rural Tennessee, so I'm sure that has something to do with it. I'd be curious to know the mileage on those old trucks, the theory that they may not have been driven much is interesting and something I never thought of.
 
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Trucks are tools and cars are toys.
You throw away toys when you get bored but you will likely keep tools around, especially if they don’t “make ‘em like they used to”.

Plus it’s more appealing to use a cheap beater truck for work than something nice. Gets dented and scratched up. Also, you cannot deny the fact that maybe people brought trucks as secondary vehicles that sat most of the time. So even at 30 years old they still got plenty of life left in them.

Either way, you rarely see older stuff here in the rust belt because of salt.
 
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The OP is likely correct. Trucks are far more likely to last a long time. Only one car makes the list, the Avalon.

Where in the Sam Hill did “iseecars” get his information from?? An Audi TT outlasting Mazdas, Toyotas?? A Navigator outlasting a Town Car (or any other Panther chassis vehicle)?? Sorry, garbage website.
 
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Where in the Sam Hill did “iseecars” get his information from?? An Audi TT outlasting Mazdas, Toyotas?? A Navigator outlasting a Town Car (or any other Panther chassis vehicle)?? Sorry, garbage website.
The methodology used is at the end of the article if you care to take a look. The data came from 13.8 million pre-owned vehicles sold in 2016. So agree or disagree with the method, that's what the data showed.
 

KJH

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They are less disposable than regular cars because they can be used for more things. Most people have no use for a 25 year old passenger car that runs but is in poor condition, it will get you from point a to b and thats it. Many people have uses for a 25+ year old truck that runs but is in poor condition. It will get you from point A to B, AND: haul heavy dirty stuff in the bed, haul heavy dirty stuff on a trailer, drive over terrain, pull stumps, plow snow etc etc etc all in one vehicle. This is reflected in their pricing, a 90s ford escort is worth scrap, a 90s f150 will still fetch at least a couple grand or more.
 

wtd

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Great points! I suspect the answer depends a lot on where someone lives. I live in rural Tennessee, so I'm sure that has something to do with it. I'd be curious to know the mileage on those old trucks, the theory that they may not have been driven much is interesting and something I never thought of.
Both of my 98 Chevy trucks have relatively low mileage for the year. My 1/2 ton that I bought new has about 141,000 miles on it now and it's no longer a daily driver like it was for the first 8 years I owned it.

I bought the 1 ton in 2007 with 94,000 miles on it and it now has 122,000 miles. I mainly bought it to haul my 18 ft car hauler because my 1/2 ton wasn't doing that great with a full load on it and to also haul our hay trailer during hay season and to also haul the stock trailer occasionally.

Since I retired over four years ago I don't drive nearly as much as before so the trucks get driven even less.
 
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The OP is likely correct. Trucks are far more likely to last a long time. Only one car makes the list, the Avalon.

1999 XLS with 277k. Monthly car payment...?? 🤣. Fires up quicker than most of the new auto start cars. Easy to find parts, breeze to self service, smooth as buttah on the highway. "Utility sedan". Maybe I'll get a truck as a secondary vehicle, but no matter how old it looks, I'll never give up my Avalon unless it gets totaled...period. Dedicated list here. 3 X 200k is possible on these cars.
 
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I have a 93 Roadtrek camper van based on a Dodge 350 chassis. I can hardly believe how sweet that Magnum 5.2 runs in it. This camper is heavy and it just takes off with it. It shift beautifully and gets 16 mpg. It only has 106K mileage. I agree about the 90's vehicles especially trucks. My youngest son had a 90 F150 with 4.9L 6 and that thing has a ton of miles and was used by a concrete plant to haul stuff. It still runs great.
 
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With my ‘trucks’ they are all very serviceable, reliable, and can be kept alive for a very long time. Any other 1995 chrysler product? Doubt it. 2005 GM sedan? It would be in the junk yard for any little reason.
 
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Pickups typically are sold with the same basic body and other components for years, and they have utility, so people keep them and fix them. Many parts from a 1992 Ranger can work on a 1984 Ranger. You can't say that about an Accord or most other cars. The body-on-frame construction makes them easier to fix, such as by swapping truck beds.

Light trucks are always in demand. That adds to the incentive to repair them.
 
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That was before fully loaded crew cab 1/2 ton trucks hit the market.
Now especially here in the south people drive trucks daily as a regular commuter vehicle. Its so stupid. I bet half of these trucks I see has never been used to tow anything or haul something that needs a truck.
 
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upstste NY
Now especially here in the south people drive trucks daily as a regular commuter vehicle. Its so stupid. I bet half of these trucks I see has never been used to tow anything or haul something that needs a truck.
Stupid?? One has better road awareness and better vision with a pickup truck than a car. When I don't know where I'm going..which is most of the time..I can see building and home address numbers a lot better. Business signage also is easier to spot. I only take the car if I'm lookin for economy. If I had a regular job and commuted I would take the pickup every time.
 
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