mobil 1 and heat and. cold

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408
Location
Ind
Does this prove anything? I put some of this new mobil 1 5w30 into a pan and put it on the stove. You know how most oils will start to smoke. Well, this didn't. Even got to the point were tiny bubbles were forming. I also noticed that this 5w30 seems thicker then there reg 5w30. It is now in the freezer. just wondering if this proves anything, other then the fact I have no life...lol
 

toyotaguy

Thread starter
Messages
408
Location
Ind
ok, not to start any arugments. I know some people that don't believe in synthetic oils. But would it not be better to run an oil that can handle heat better?
 
Messages
11,185
Location
Bad Axe, MI
 Originally Posted By: toyotaguy
sorry, its the new high mile 5w30
where are you finding 5w30M1 HM at and how much?? i didn't think this oil is oout yet??
 

toyotaguy

Thread starter
Messages
408
Location
Ind
I posted it on another thread. I was in Indianapolis for a funeral. I found it at O'rielys auto parts. Seems like a Murrays auto parts. Similer. It was $6.99. I assume it will be around $6.27 at walmart. when it hits the shelves there
 

toyotaguy

Thread starter
Messages
408
Location
Ind
I just found this. Why did I end up on this website? O'Reilly Auto Parts Murray's Discount Auto Stores was acquired by O'Reilly Auto Parts in June of 2008. The website MurraysDiscount.com has been redirected to OReillyAuto.com, where we are working to combine all the great attributes of both sites. As we undergo this transition, some of the benefits you will notice include: * Increased Inventory - All stores will now have a mixture of Murray's & O'Reilly products, which will vary by manufacturer. You will now have the option of products and manufacturers that you never had before. * Same Murray's Storefronts - All stores will retain the Murray's look and feel for a period of time. This includes Murray's signs and colors. * Ability to Buy Online, Pick Up in Store - The transition to O'Reilly means you can now make purchases online and pick them up from your local Murray's/O'Reilly Auto Parts store! This new functionality is only available from O'Reilly Auto Parts. For details on how this works, check out the link below. * Find a Murray's Store - Finding a local Murray's/O'Reilly store has never been easier. All stores will be marked with a yellow pin on the Find a Store map for easy recognition. Store information will be accessible after selecting a store, including store hours, location and phone number.
 
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1,904
Location
Canada
 Originally Posted By: ZZman
I think so. But many people feel they never use their vehicles in a manner that they need high heat protection.
Flashpoint is a 'bulk' property, whereas individual components (molecules) of motor oil have their own individual vapour pressures and flashpoints. The higher the flashpoint, the more resistant the oil will be, overall, to chemical change. The longer the drain interval possible, etc. Even cars that don't run very hot can take very good advantage of high flashpoint oils. They simply will last much longer than their lower flashpoint counterparts. Its no coincidence that a cool running engine + a high flashpoint motor oil = an excellent candidate for extended (ie: >25k mile) drains.
 
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19,479
Location
Chicago Area
I am not sure that a higher flashpoint indicates that an oil will be resistant to chemical change better. It may be worse in this respect, but have a higher flashpoint. Flashpoint would be most involved at the piston top ring and oil on the cylinder walls. This is the hottest, except for maybe the oil on the exhaust valve stems/guides. So higher is better. The flashpoint #s are generally listed as one of the oil's specifications - pretty easy to get.
 

JAG

Messages
5,320
Location
Fredericksburg, VA
 Originally Posted By: pitzel
The higher the flashpoint, the more resistant the oil will be, overall, to chemical change. The longer the drain interval possible, etc. Even cars that don't run very hot can take very good advantage of high flashpoint oils. They simply will last much longer than their lower flashpoint counterparts. Its no coincidence that a cool running engine + a high flashpoint motor oil = an excellent candidate for extended (ie: >25k mile) drains.
An oil flashes in the flashpoint test when a combustible air/oil mixture is present when a spark occurs. In general, it doesn't relate well to resistance to chemical change. It also doesn't generally relate well to the oil lasting longer in an engine. How cold is a cool running engine? Bulk oil temperatures should be hot enough to quickly evaporate blowby from the oil and cool enough to not excessively "cook" the oil. 215 F is a near ideal IMO. To the original poster: the bubbles you saw are the most volatile components boiling. Assuming no burning, seeing "smoke" is a large concentration of oil vapor/mist.
 
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