leaking cv boot repaired, will she live or die?

Joined
Feb 7, 2013
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597
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st louis, mo
Couple of thoughts: Just rebooted my Volvo S40 with blue-box Volvo boots and grease. The grease for the outers is high-moly stuff, but the inners use grease that is honey-colored. I've put some aftermarket axles (Advance Auto) on our minivan and they have held up fine. gl...
 

RichardS

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Joined
Jan 14, 2017
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660
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Melbourne, Florida
Brages, The grease that drained out looked like a milky honey, so that may have been the case with mine, as well. I was sort of suspecting it could have been water that had been emulsified into it, but that might have been the normal color. However, I couldn’t find any reference to different grease for inner and outer, so went with one from valvoline labeled for cv joints. If AAP, AZ, or O’R had non-reman units for a price considerably less than the acdelco from RA, I’d jump on them. But again, factoring in that the leaking was coming from where the boot was clamped onto the axle, I still couldn’t rationalize replacing them when 2 new clamps and a tube of grease was $10. Hence the countdown-to-failure. I’ll either succeed, or be served my fair share of “I told you so” pie.
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2014
Messages
596
Location
Margate England
My wifes car has still got its original axle shafts, with both sides rebooted a few times. They run quiet, even when driven hard on full lock - the standard rough and ready test for a bad cv joint. The car (and the axles) has a quarter of a million miles behind it. I hadn't necessarily spotted a leaking boot straight away, maybe as much as a month possibly, and the car has been used as a cab for nearly all its life. In fact I've only had one car with noisy cv boots out of maybe 15 fwd cars I have owned, and I drove that for about 8000 miles before I scrapped it due to rust. The conclusion I draw from this is that cv joints have a massive safety margin built into them. Way back in 1966 a British consumer magazine deliberately tested some to destruction, they had to clean out all the grease and repack the boots with abrasives added to shorten their lives. They tested 4 cars, in every case it was immediately apparent something was very wrong, from knocking noises, stiff steering, to severe vibrations. When the joints did fail typically after 150 miles or so, it had no adverse effects on the cars steering or braking, the car simply lost drive and rolled to a stop. So replace your torn boots, repack with proper cv grease, and stop worrying. Claud.
 
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Joined
Feb 20, 2007
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5,239
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Southeast
OP - I think you did good. There's a million ways to mess it up, but it now has CV grease whereas before it did not. It's tricky doing work like that in an apartment lot. You have to stay small and quick. I think you will benefit. -m
 

RichardS

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Joined
Jan 14, 2017
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Melbourne, Florida
Well, so far so good. 220 miles in, 120 of that non-stop on the freeway and I didn’t have anything come apart, my only concern about the repair.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
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26,691
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Stretch boots work okay and last, the make the job quick and easy. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Dorman-Kit-CV-Boot-Installation-Tool-New-614-035/122531328222?epid=1354480690&hash=item1c876fb0de:g:fHAAAOSwA4Ba3xS1&vxp=mtr
 
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