Leaking AC compressor life....

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7,407
Location
FL, USA
The AC compressor on the Accord in my sig is leaking oil/freon. I noticed this the other day when I was underneath the car and saw oil on the oil pan, then realized it was flinging off of the AC compressor. I took it in the my mechanic to get their opinion on where the oil was coming from and they did confirm it was leaking from the compressor, he said that it will need a new one but just to run this one until it stops working. As of now the air still blows cold. Has anyone had a leaking compressor before, and if so about how long should I expect this one to last? I will need to save up to get this fixed. Not even sure how much it will be but I know its pricey. Thanks!
 
Messages
1,464
Location
Gulf Coast, MS
My old Volvo leaked. I think it would leak out in about 2 weeks. As for killing it even after 4 years it didn't die. To be honest tho I stopped putting freon in it long before that.
 
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628
Location
DuQuoin, Illinois
Some where between 5 minutes and 5 years is my guess. Seriously, no telling. Probably be cheaper to replace before it fails completely and sends pieces through the system which could involve replacing more parts.
 
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737
Location
NC USA
I would fix it now, if it locks up the black death will spread throughout the whole system and it will cost a lot more to repair.
 
Messages
10,693
Location
Jupiter, Florida
My Sanden compressor on my Jaguar X-Type has been leaking for the last 5 years. I need to top it off every summer now. Still blows cold here in South Florida. You can probably get a name brand, exactly the same, replacement compressor on eeeebay for 1/4 the price a dealer would charge. It may not have the Honda tag on it, but it will be made by the OEM that provides the units to Honda and will perform/last the same. The Chinese ones are to be avoided.
 

JTK

Messages
13,432
Location
Buffalo, NY
If it does stop blowing cold (lost it's charge), I'd pull the a/c compressor clutch relay to keep it from trying to cycle. Then get the a/c work done when you can.
 

hsd

Messages
249
Location
NE
My 2000 Accords compressor leaked for a couple of years before needing a can of refrigerant. That was two years ago and it was still working fine when I sold it earlier this year, so they can run a long time or they may fail quickly. I would follow your mechanics advice and run it till it dies. The freon will likely leak out and shut down the compressor on low pressure before it breaks mechanically.
 
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22,446
Location
Apple Valley, California
Originally Posted By: Cujet
My Sanden compressor on my Jaguar X-Type has been leaking for the last 5 years. I need to top it off every summer now. Still blows cold here in South Florida.
is it leaking visible oil like the op's?
 
Messages
10,693
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Originally Posted By: Chris142
Originally Posted By: Cujet
My Sanden compressor on my Jaguar X-Type has been leaking for the last 5 years. I need to top it off every summer now. Still blows cold here in South Florida.
is it leaking visible oil like the op's?
Yes, there is always green oil on the bottom of the compressor. It's not a huge oil leak, but it does exist. It takes about 1/2 can per year.
 
Messages
1,121
Location
Hawkinsville Ga
A friend had his compressor deemed bad/leaking by his Ford dealer....I checked it over and it needed the AC control valve (rear of compressor) and vacuum/recharge system. It works fine to this day and no leaks. I think the green drip coming off the compressor was from the "technician" disconnecting his gauges.
 
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8,598
Location
Florida
When the compressor fails, you will always be required to flush out the system, replace the drier/accumulator and the expansion valve/orifice tube anyway, so I would just keep using the compressor until it is completely dead.
 

gregk24

Thread starter
Messages
7,407
Location
FL, USA
Here is a question, if its just a slow leak...would it be smart to have the system "recharged"? And is a recharge just an extraction of old fluid and a fill with new fluid?
 

Nick1994

$50 Site Donor
Messages
13,282
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Originally Posted By: gregk24
Here is a question, if its just a slow leak...would it be smart to have the system "recharged"? And is a recharge just an extraction of old fluid and a fill with new fluid?
You can recharge it yourself with a kit from the auto parts store, now that is about as simple as pumping gas
 

gregk24

Thread starter
Messages
7,407
Location
FL, USA
Originally Posted By: Nick1994
Originally Posted By: gregk24
Here is a question, if its just a slow leak...would it be smart to have the system "recharged"? And is a recharge just an extraction of old fluid and a fill with new fluid?
You can recharge it yourself with a kit from the auto parts store, now that is about as simple as pumping gas
I thought you had to vacuum everything out before refilling, because you DONT know how much to put in, and you could over charge it. Am I right?
 

Nick1994

$50 Site Donor
Messages
13,282
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Originally Posted By: gregk24
Originally Posted By: Nick1994
Originally Posted By: gregk24
Here is a question, if its just a slow leak...would it be smart to have the system "recharged"? And is a recharge just an extraction of old fluid and a fill with new fluid?
You can recharge it yourself with a kit from the auto parts store, now that is about as simple as pumping gas
I thought you had to vacuum everything out before refilling, because you DONT know how much to put in, and you could over charge it. Am I right?
Thats if you're opening the system i.e. replacing compressor. Nothing wrong with topping off as needed. I've done it to several cars. Click this link to see the r134a refiller All you do is hook it up to the A/C line (can't remember whether the high or low side, but it only fits on one.) and squeeze the trigger with the A/C on and on full blast. You can also use it to just look at how much PSI is in there. There will be a guide on the side telling you what the PSI should be, it depends on the outside temperature. Edit: guide on the side of the can
 
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Messages
6,014
Location
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Originally Posted By: artificialist
When the compressor fails, you will always be required to flush out the system, replace the drier/accumulator and the expansion valve/orifice tube anyway, so I would just keep using the compressor until it is completely dead.
If the compressor fails due to leakage, you can just replace it without all that other stuff.
 
Messages
11,660
Location
NorthEast
I understand that you are worried that the compressor might cost you big bucks in the future. UNLESS you want to spend big bucks NOW, you need to stop worrying about it UNTIL the A/C stops cooling your car. A lot of people have told you this but apparently you do not want to believe them. Adding too much refrigerant to working system is a BAD idea. You may blindly add it if you find the cooling performance has gone down but still not the correct way to handle it. BUT if your system is cooling properly, DO NOT ADD ANY REFRIGERANT. But it is like giving advice to a wall :-(
 

gregk24

Thread starter
Messages
7,407
Location
FL, USA
Originally Posted By: Vikas
I understand that you are worried that the compressor might cost you big bucks in the future. UNLESS you want to spend big bucks NOW, you need to stop worrying about it UNTIL the A/C stops cooling your car. A lot of people have told you this but apparently you do not want to believe them. Adding too much refrigerant to working system is a BAD idea. You may blindly add it if you find the cooling performance has gone down but still not the correct way to handle it. BUT if your system is cooling properly, DO NOT ADD ANY REFRIGERANT. M But it is like giving advice to a wall :-(
I appreciate the advice, why would I ignore it.
 
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