I'm Considering Nitrogen vs Air Again

4WD

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Like I added above that would have to be some kind of leak.
Folks get too comfortable with “inert” gas … been called a silent killer … used to apply the death sentence and of course so called painless suicidal events.
IMO if N2 would take the place of compressed air in all places… the crowded tire stores and workers would do stupid things.
On the argument of tire pressure? I read where if you start with 30 psi (in one year) … you will likely drop 2.2 psi with N2 and 3.5 psi with air. Not me … I’m going to release some air in the Jeep tires today
 
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The question is when they inflate the tires from the mounting machine is it actually nitrogen? Do they only have 1 nitrogen compressor they use to power the equipment and power tools?
honestly I don't know the details, and I trust Costco; Nitrogen they put in tires has no reacted to the outside temperature inversion, were stable for so long
 

Astro14

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honestly I don't know the details, and I trust Costco; Nitrogen they put in tires has no reacted to the outside temperature inversion, were stable for so long
Seriously? The Nitrogen has NOT reacted to outside temperature?

Must be magic, then...
 
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Folks get too comfortable with “inert” gas … been called a silent killer … used to apply the death sentence and of course so called painless suicidal events.
IMO if N2 would take the place of compressed air in all places… the crowded tire stores and workers would do stupid things.
On the argument of tire pressure? I read where if you start with 30 psi (in one year) … you will likely drop 2.2 psi with N2 and 3.5 psi with air. Not me … I’m going to release some air in the Jeep tires today

The German word for Nitrogen translates to "suffocating substance". Same for Dutch...
 

Astro14

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I bought my last set of tires at a Costco, I’m happy with them and with Costco.

But they still needed a pressure adjustment when the temperature outside dropped.

Guess the Nitrogen in my tires didn’t get the memo...

So, instead of magically staying at the same pressure when the temperature changed, my Nitrogen followed the basic laws of chemistry, and changed pressure...
 

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I bought my last set of tires at a Costco, I’m happy with them and with Costco.

But they still needed a pressure adjustment when the temperature outside dropped.

Guess the Nitrogen in my tires didn’t get the memo...

So, instead of magically staying at the same pressure when the temperature changed, my Nitrogen followed the basic laws of chemistry, and changed pressure...
You have to ask for synthetic nitrogen 😷
 
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The German word for Nitrogen translates to "suffocating substance". Same for Dutch...
No doubt, as is the same for many other gasses especially those that are odorless and tasteless. However, in order to do this you need to displace a significant amount of the oxygen in the air and that would indeed take a large leak from cylinders stored in an enclosed location. It could happen of course but it would have to be big leak and likely from multiple cylinders at the same time.
 
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Hello,

When the tires on one of my previous cars became over 5 years old, I had to add air to them more often than I wanted to because it slowly leaked. Then I was suggested to use nitrogen and it helped a lot. I only needed to get them topped off 2x a year after a while, with nitrogen. Then I got rid of that car and got a car that I put a new set of tires on, and the tech told me that air will work just fine on these tires and it did.
But then I traded that car also and the car I have now has Goodyear Assurance tires that have maybe 30k miles left on them. I put 40 PSI in them and I noticed the other day that after about 3 months, I now have 36 PSI when the tires are warmed up after driving the car. I seemed to lose about 8 PSI. So again, I'm thinking of running nitrogen so it will hold the PSI for longer periods of time. I only drive the car about 4k miles a year, so these tires could last me 7 years. It will cost me about $20 + tax for nitrogen in 4 tires, with free top offs if needed. Or maybe the tires won't leak much more and will stay in the mid 30s PSI.
Any thoughts on this without condemning me for using nitrogen? It seems that older tires don't hold the PSI like new tires do, and I only drive 4k miles +/- a year so I tend to have older tires on my cars lately. I think it will be well worth the $22 to get it and have more stable PSI in the next 5+ years on these tires.
I had nitrogen in my original tires, then went to air with my new tires and then went back to nitrogen exactly for the reasons you gave, my old knees couldn't handle the weekly inflations. :cry:
 
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I bought my last set of tires at a Costco, I’m happy with them and with Costco.

But they still needed a pressure adjustment when the temperature outside dropped.

Guess the Nitrogen in my tires didn’t get the memo...

So, instead of magically staying at the same pressure when the temperature changed, my Nitrogen followed the basic laws of chemistry, and changed pressure...
So, is it a safe assumption that the vehicle(s) in which you had/have Nitrogen (not synthetic) are not garaged in winter? Because I have Nitrogen filled tires from Costco (3+ years old), which spend winter in a heated garage and my pressures haven't dropped ANY. (YMMV)
 

Astro14

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So, is it a safe assumption that the vehicle(s) in which you had/have Nitrogen (not synthetic) are not garaged in winter? Because I have Nitrogen filled tires from Costco (3+ years old), which spend winter in a heated garage and my pressures haven't dropped ANY. (YMMV)
If you’re checking your tires in a warm garage on a cold winter day, then you’re going to get a false reading.

Because, when you operate the car outside, and they cool to ambient temps, your tires will be under inflated.

Of course, the degree of under inflation depends on the temperature differential.

But do a cold check outside, after three hours of being parked, as your manual likely recommends, and you’ll see just how much they drop.
 

Astro14

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Put another way: if you check your tires in your garage, you have ensured that your tires are set for operation at the temperature of your garage.

If the outside temp is the same, you’re fine.

If it isn’t- you are not fine.
 
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No doubt, as is the same for many other gasses especially those that are odorless and tasteless. However, in order to do this you need to displace a significant amount of the oxygen in the air and that would indeed take a large leak from cylinders stored in an enclosed location. It could happen of course but it would have to be big leak and likely from multiple cylinders at the same time.

I wouldn't agree with storing pressurised cylinders in a poorly ventilated room anyway.
 
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