i simply forgot how good deep frying was

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3,258
Location
Indiana
Today the light bulb went ON and instead of throwing my sons lunch in the oven (crinkle fries and dinasour shaped chicken nuggets) i poured some vegtable oil in my deep pan and cranked up the gas, When done cooking i put a dash of seasoning salt on the fries and served with sweet baby rays BBQ sauce.. AMAZING.. the best chicken nuggets ive ever tasted, and the fries were perfect.. I dont own a deepfryer anymore but may consider buying another soon.
 
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3,111
Location
Cincinnati
Deep frying gets a bad rap, and for good reason. However, when things are cooked at the proper, higher temp without oil absorption, it's really not that much worse for you. It's restaurants with crummy fryers that dip way down in temp that allows the grease to soak into the coatings/skin. Trust me, I'm originally from Buffalo. We like us some fried food.
 
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5,941
Location
Arlington
Oh man...so many awesome things come from frying. It's difficult to find good fish and chips in Texas, but it can be done. There were actually quite a few German settlers in Texas throughout the 19th century. You can get a good Schnitzel. I still am of the opinion that was the inspiration for Chicken Fried Steak. The Hare Krishnas have a vegetarian restaurant in Dallas. The chickpea floured pakoras are awesome. But then there's the fried chicken. Chef Keith Hicks' Chicken and Waffles are the best thing this side of Gladys Knight's restaurant in Atlanta. No, deep fried foods are not something to eat everyday, but I think you are not really living if you deny yourself.
 
Messages
116
Location
Illinois
Did you know they make a consumer "pressure fryer"? Cook chicken tenderloins like Chick-fil-A or make fried chicken like kfc (use to). [censored] pressure fryer. I may not use it often but when I do, it is good. And Chris, it is not always the temperature; it's the cheap cooking oil most restaurants use. Different oil breaks down at different temperatures and older "used" oil breaks down at cooler temperatures. About the hottest is peanut oil but it does not taste the best, seems mostly flavorless.
 
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16,014
Location
NE,Ohio
Originally Posted By: oppirs
Quote:
Trust me, I'm originally from Buffalo. We like us some fried food.
I have had the best HOT wings from your old town!
MMMM I'm guessing anchor bar and grill... those were some BIG wings.. yum.
 
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2,695
Location
Easton, PA
people are always amazed at how good and NOT greasy my wife's fried chicken is; she uses yellow mustard instead of egg, and then a seasoned flour mixture, and uses regular vegatable oil at a high temp (IDK how high, she doesn't use a thermometer).
 
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4,288
Location
Michigan
Originally Posted By: dave munson
And Chris, it is not always the temperature; it's the cheap cooking oil most restaurants use. Different oil breaks down at different temperatures and older "used" oil breaks down at cooler temperatures. About the hottest is peanut oil but it does not taste the best, seems mostly flavorless.
Just watched a show where they tried to determine the KFC herbs and spices and a laboratory found that they use soybean oil for their frying.
 
Messages
116
Location
Illinois
I believe the Colonel started with Crisco. Someting I read on how he demonstrated his chicken in Utah at the first restaurant. Unfortunately, Crisco changed over the years. And White Lily all-purpose flour makes the best breading (low protean content - the opposite of bread flour). And the chicken is fried under pressure. You can read up on our efforts to duplicate perfection at: http://kfc.forumup.co.uk/ The recipes and procedures at this (above) site are close. What you can make in your kitchen is better than they sell now-a-days at kfc. Larger chicken pieces, not pigeon. Fresher spices. Bolder flavor. More close to what kfc was years ago before they cut back on how much spices and cheaper frying oil that gives you the runs and smaller chicken. One spice pack you can buy today is called "99X" or "Chicken Seasoning 99-X" and can be purchased from Marion Kay spices (along with some fine flake salt). I purchased a pack of 99x and it is really, really close. The Colonel use to purchase his spice blend from Marion Kay spices... Remember to make cracklings to add to the gravy.
 
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Messages
116
Location
Illinois
When I use my normal fry oil, it is almost a gallon of fry oil from Gorden Food Services. That's the right amount for my fryer, a {hummm. the brand name is censured - it is the brand sold by pro-selections.com} pressure fryer. I drop the chicken in (first the larger pieces followed by the smaller) at 375 with the power burner on full. The temp drops immediately with all that chicken being introduced. If the temp gets much above 400 the oil starts to break down. I let it cook in the oil for around 60 seconds, softly stirring to break up the chicken so they don't stick together. After that I put the lid on my pressure fryer. When the pressure builds up enough to jiggle the top I start the timer and slide the pot from the power burner to a normal burner on medium. It takes about 8-9 minutes under full pressure depending on how big the pieces are. I release pressure and remove the chicken. The chicken is placed on a wire rack above a cookie sheet (lets the grease drop off) and that I start heating the oil for the second batch on the power burner. Once in a while we have wing night. Some times I make the wings a clone of KFC original recipe. Something I think the colonel would approve.
 
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Messages
116
Location
Illinois
dwcopple, it only takes a bit of nuttyness. One of the posts describe how to cook kfc chicken in the oven: http://kfc.forumup.co.uk/about582-kfc.html All you need is a few spices (I really recommend the 99x + salt from Marion Kay rather than custom spice mixing and grinding). This is the story on 99X spice mix from Marion Kay: http://kfc.forumup.co.uk/about324-kfc.html If you start this, people will think you are nuts. On the other hand, do it right and those same people will actually drool and groan when biting into the chicken you cook. The oil: My bad. Evidence is that KFC was using cottonseed shortening back in the 70's. To be exact, Kraft Red Label Shortening, composed of a mix of cottonseed oil and soybean oil. I think crisco was not always soybean. http://kfc.forumup.co.uk/about903-kfc.html
 
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