I found my 3.5 liter Ecoboost oil...Chevron Delo 5W40 CK4

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Originally Posted by dave1251
Nothing you described is a lube issue. https://www.f150ecoboost.net/threads/high-mileage-f-150-3-5l-ecoboost-questions.75812/ https://www.thehulltruth.com/trucks-trailers/1034001-high-mileage-ecoboosts-3.html https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/foru...rd-2-7-ecoboost-v6-on-normal-maintenance The issue I recall is your vehicles spend a lot more than average in idle topped of with hours of city driving. Viscosity is not a cure for this. What was the mileage and hours when the chains failed again?
Oil shearing isn't a lube issue?
 
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Only reservations I would have about running this, or a similar oil in my 3.5 Ecoboost, is the oil doesn't meet Ford's B1 spec, which I thought was specified to help reduce LSPI. My understanding is that the Ford Ecoboost engines can develop the damaging low speed pre-ignition which affects various turbocharged or supercharged engines across multiple manufacturers. Oils which do meet the B1 spec appear to have significantly lower calcium as a detergent, using another compound for that purpose. I have read that high levels of calcium have been shown as a possible contributor to LSPI. Just information I've gleaned from this, and other sites. I would love to use a slightly higher viscosity oil than the 5W30 I currently run, which I change at 5K mile intervals. but haven't found one which meets Fords spec yet.
 

Navi

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My vehicles do a LOT more of everything from driving to idling, starting, stopping, etc. Definitely what I do is clearly severe service. I think when Ford proclaimed to use 5W30 Semi-Synthetic they were trying to satisfy everyone. Satisfy the government imposed mpg standards. Satisfy the guy trying to get his oil changed and not getting a big bill for it. An oil that works good in all weather environments. I just cant see using the 5W30 for severe service such as lots of towing, livery work, etc. As for LSPI the Delo is rated AP SN Plus which addresses that whereas the Delvac doesnt carry that rating. I will take a look at Phillips 66 Triton ECT 5w40. Im into trying new oils because if you dont try then how do you know? One last thing I wanted to point out is no one should be shy about going thicker with the oil on the Ecoboost. Ive been running 5W40 through the engine for a while now. Mobil 1 TDT, Delvac and now Delo. Testing reveals its doing better than average and the engine shows no indication to me its not liking the oil. It seems smoother and quieter with the 5W40. No trouble lights going off. No mysterious problems. etc...
 
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Originally Posted by dlundblad
Originally Posted by dave1251
Nothing you described is a lube issue. https://www.f150ecoboost.net/threads/high-mileage-f-150-3-5l-ecoboost-questions.75812/ https://www.thehulltruth.com/trucks-trailers/1034001-high-mileage-ecoboosts-3.html https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/foru...rd-2-7-ecoboost-v6-on-normal-maintenance The issue I recall is your vehicles spend a lot more than average in idle topped of with hours of city driving. Viscosity is not a cure for this. What was the mileage and hours when the chains failed again?
Oil shearing isn't a lube issue?
Nope because oils have sheared since there have been muti-grades. The recommended grade was used for durability testing for reasons unknown Joe Blow BITOGER believes this isn't the case. I guess it is because they log on and don't read anything.
 
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Originally Posted by Navi
My vehicles do a LOT more of everything from driving to idling, starting, stopping, etc. Definitely what I do is clearly severe service. I think when Ford proclaimed to use 5W30 Semi-Synthetic they were trying to satisfy everyone. Satisfy the government imposed mpg standards. Satisfy the guy trying to get his oil changed and not getting a big bill for it. An oil that works good in all weather environments. I just cant see using the 5W30 for severe service such as lots of towing, livery work, etc. As for LSPI the Delo is rated AP SN Plus which addresses that whereas the Delvac doesnt carry that rating. I will take a look at Phillips 66 Triton ECT 5w40. Im into trying new oils because if you dont try then how do you know? One last thing I wanted to point out is no one should be shy about going thicker with the oil on the Ecoboost. Ive been running 5W40 through the engine for a while now. Mobil 1 TDT, Delvac and now Delo. Testing reveals its doing better than average and the engine shows no indication to me its not liking the oil. It seems smoother and quieter with the 5W40. No trouble lights going off. No mysterious problems. etc...
You still have not answered my question. What was the mileage and hours of operation when the timing chain failed. It also failed after switching to a thicker grade if you posting timeline is accurate. If you answer this I likely have the answer why it failed but you will not like it.
 

Navi

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The timing chain never failed on my vehicle. What happened is my vehicle developed a cold start rattle in early 2019. I looked on the internet and found this was a fairly common issue and so I took it into the dealership thinking that Ford knew the answer. Well, they knew the answer for the 1st generation Ecoboost, but they didnt know the answer for the 2nd generation Ecoboost. Thus they went about replacing every single part they thought it could possibly be...the kitchen sink approach to fixing a problem...thus they replaced the timing chain and many other things which didnt need to be replaced. That fix solved the cold start rattle problem for several months until it started happening again. Now, it looks like Ford did a little more research into that issue and so the next time around they replaced the camphasers with updated camphasers. Great! While my truck was at the shop I rented a new Expedition Max and guess what happened when I started it...cold start rattle...and that one has the updated camphasers! So I dont think anyone knows the answer to the problem of "cold start rattle" on this truck. As for the mileage when the "cold start rattle" occurred it was 95000 but on the Ford Expedition I rented that one was at 30,000 miles. As for the hours of operation there is no hour meter on this vehicle and I do have Forscan and cant find where it would be on that either. So I have no idea. The thicker oil is not just to attempt to prevent the "cold start rattle" from happening. Its also to prevent other issues which are unknown at this time. The "cold start rattle" problem is not the only issue Ive had with this vehicle. So far both turbos were replaced and a laundry list of other things. Im just wondering when the other shoe will drop and so Im doing my best to prevent the other shoe from dropping. Ive worked very closely with Ford on this vehicle while it spent several months in the shop being their experiment. I spent time talking with the Ford youtube tech. Ive exhaustedly scoured the internet. I am very familiar with the problems on this vehicle. No one really knows whats making the truck one day start up and cold start rattle.
 

Navi

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Im my region, the Chevrolet Suburban is used very extensively. Ive known 3 guys who have had to replace engines past 100k miles and all of them used the 0W20 oil specified by Chevrolet. Oil is fairly inexpensive but to replace that engine the budget answer is $5000 and the dealership answer is $8000. While using the thicker oil may or may not be the answer, its a fairly inexpensive exercise and if it has any benefit in extending the life of the engine its worth it. I do know the thicker oil makes it quite a bit quieter and refined. I also know that it does resolve the oil leakage issues which develop overtime in areas with a gasket like the pan. So if you put in thicker oil there will be a benefit of a more refined engine and less leaks. At this point I will not use W20 anything. I believe the W20 oils are simply a way for manufacturers resolve corporate fuel economy concerns, but its not helpful for the life of the engine.
 
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Originally Posted by Navi
Im my region, the Chevrolet Suburban is used very extensively. Ive known 3 guys who have had to replace engines past 100k miles and all of them used the 0W20 oil specified by Chevrolet. Oil is fairly inexpensive but to replace that engine the budget answer is $5000 and the dealership answer is $8000. While using the thicker oil may or may not be the answer, its a fairly inexpensive exercise and if it has any benefit in extending the life of the engine its worth it. I do know the thicker oil makes it quite a bit quieter and refined. I also know that it does resolve the oil leakage issues which develop overtime in areas with a gasket like the pan. So if you put in thicker oil there will be a benefit of a more refined engine and less leaks. At this point I will not use W20 anything. I believe the W20 oils are simply a way for manufacturers resolve corporate fuel economy concerns, but its not helpful for the life of the engine.
And yet millions of SBC outlive to design life with improper maintenance and many are beat on with the recommended grade.
 
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Originally Posted by IMSA_Racing_Fan
Good explanation, I agree. One weird thing: They go with 5W20 in a Suburban but GM specifies 5W30 in the CTS 3.0 (which I appreciate).
What does a Suburban and a CTS 3.0 share engine wise? https://www.google.com/amp/s/gmauth...w-engines-for-2014-silverado-sierra/amp/ https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a...lity-by-beating-the-crap-out-of-engines/ I trust GM and their recommendation a lot more than a couple of guys on the internet. There is also a few members here can explain the quality and amount of engineering and testing was dedicated to the Ecotec line.
 
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I'm sorry but I can't help but laugh when people talk about the engineers. Engineers report to pencil pushers who report to executives who report to shareholders who are bound by governmental regulations and dollars and cents. Yes most engines will outlive the rest of the vehicle with reasonable care but I think we can stop pretending making tweaks to V8 gasoline internal combustion engines that have been around forever require some kind of degree in nuclear physics to comprehend
 
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Navi

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Ford and General Motors vehicles are simply not engineered that well. I had a 2016 Suburban and things started breaking before 70000 miles. I have an MKT and a Navigator and things are constantly breaking. If you are looking for a well engineered car look at Toyota hybrids and Toyota 4 cylinder cars like the Camry. Those just keep going. If you were in a remote place and needed a vehicle with total reliability it wouldnt be Ford and GM. I would choose a Toyota 4 cylinder Tacoma truck.
 
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Originally Posted by Navi
Ford and General Motors vehicles are simply not engineered that well. I had a 2016 Suburban and things started breaking before 70000 miles. I have an MKT and a Navigator and things are constantly breaking. If you are looking for a well engineered car look at Toyota hybrids and Toyota 4 cylinder cars like the Camry. Those just keep going. If you were in a remote place and needed a vehicle with total reliability it wouldnt be Ford and GM. I would choose a Toyota 4 cylinder Tacoma truck.
Why are you having problems millions of owners simply don't have accross mutiple platforms?
 
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Originally Posted by Strjock81
I'm sorry but I can't help but laugh when people talk about the engineers. Engineers report to pencil pushers who report to executives who report to shareholders who are bound by governmental regulations and dollars and cents. Yes most engines will outlive the rest of the vehicle with reasonable care but I think we can stop pretending making tweaks to V8 gasoline internal combustion engines that have been around forever require some kind of degree in nuclear physics to comprehend
I'm sorry you didn't comprehend the links. Must be a unique issue.
 
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Originally Posted by dave1251
Originally Posted by Strjock81
I'm sorry but I can't help but laugh when people talk about the engineers. Engineers report to pencil pushers who report to executives who report to shareholders who are bound by governmental regulations and dollars and cents. Yes most engines will outlive the rest of the vehicle with reasonable care but I think we can stop pretending making tweaks to V8 gasoline internal combustion engines that have been around forever require some kind of degree in nuclear physics to comprehend
I'm sorry you didn't comprehend the links. Must be a unique issue.
They're short, simple fluff pieces that any layman can understand. 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

Navi

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When I talk about "reliability" I mean getting to 100k miles without any major issues. The GMs and Fords Ive driven simply cant make it to 100k without something big being replaced. Many years ago in 2009 I needed a personal car but the economy was such that I didnt want to spend too much on it. So I got a 1999 Toyota Solara 4 cylinder with 150000 miles bought for $3000. I put 70000 miles on it without an issue. It need some new tires, new struts/shocks and a catalytic converter bought cheaply aftermarket off of RockAuto. However it didnt need anything involving the engine or the trans. That was a 1990s vintage Toyota. 21 years later Ford and GM can only imagine such durability.
 
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Tell this to our abused worked hard fleet of trucks not needing major repairs in over 300k. Ill do knock down the GM 6l90trucks for trannys giving out at or before 200k, the old 4l80 took abuse nicely some made it to 400k before going out.
 
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