How thin can U go

Messages
918
Location
PA
Just out of curiosity, what is the thinnest oil out there? Is it 0W-20 or is there something thinner than that? If 0W20 is the thinnest, then what brand oil is thinnest? No real practical reason just wondering.
 
Messages
6,318
Location
Canton, GA
 Originally Posted By: chevrofreak
You can get 0W-5, might even be some lower
May as well just put tap water in the [censored] thing!!
 
Messages
1,283
Location
Canada City, Canada
 Originally Posted By: lexus114
 Originally Posted By: chevrofreak
You can get 0W-5, might even be some lower
May as well just put tap water in the [censored] thing!!
In 20 years people will call you a dinosaur for refusing to think anything less than a 20 wt oil can protect an engine.
 
Messages
6,784
Location
Huntington Beach, CA
http://www.synergynracing.com/products/lts_oils.html Synergyn Oil, Inc. has been researching lighter and lighter weight synthetic engine oils since the late 1980s. The goal was: Refusing to sacrifice protection while reducing the horsepower robbed by engines having to "push" heavy weight oils. Starting with LTS 3w30 Racing Oil, Synergyn's research team of racers and chemists have progressed to what they call 0 Weight Oils. As hands-on knowledge increased, successful testing was completed on 0w-16 wt., 0w-8 wt. and 0w-4 wt. engine oils. The culmination of ongoing research is the development of Synergyn® "Quad-0" or LTS 0000 Racing Engine Oil. Dyson's 0 Weight Engine Oils produce more horsepower to the ground than any other engine oil on the market today. Following recommended change intervals will provide complete protection to expensive racing engine parts.
 
Messages
549
Location
New Mexico, U.S.A.
 Originally Posted By: D189379
In 20 years people will call you a dinosaur for refusing to think anything less than a 20 wt oil can protect an engine.
Probably. If personal IC transportation hasn't been outlawed to reduce environmental impact, that is.
 
Messages
39,806
Location
Pottstown, PA
Apparently when you go much lower than a 4.x base stock, volatility climbs substantially. Bruce cited this as a reason why he's pretty much on the floor when talking about an every day PCMO with any kind of longevity in use in our 0w-10 distractions. You're limited on the physical amount of additives that you can add due to how much they alter the end blend visc. They're all packaged in their own carrier oil at a concentrated ppm level. So, if you need MEGA ADDITIVES and need to "make room" for it in terms of a lower base stock, you're going to have volatility. Not so much an issue for 5 qualifying laps.
 
Messages
3,546
Location
Massachusetts
 Originally Posted By: D189379
 Originally Posted By: lexus114
 Originally Posted By: chevrofreak
You can get 0W-5, might even be some lower
May as well just put tap water in the [censored] thing!!
In 20 years people will call you a dinosaur for refusing to think anything less than a 20 wt oil can protect an engine.
Yes people might also call me a dinosaur too but if 5w30 can give me >300,000 miles on my vehicles, I am more than happy with that and they can call me a dinosaur.
 
Messages
9,427
Location
Pensacola & Vero Beach FL
 Originally Posted By: Gary Allan
Apparently when you go much lower than a 4.x base stock, volatility climbs substantially. Bruce cited this as a reason why he's pretty much on the floor when talking about an every day PCMO with any kind of longevity in use in our 0w-10 distractions. You're limited on the physical amount of additives that you can add due to how much they alter the end blend visc. They're all packaged in their own carrier oil at a concentrated ppm level. So, if you need MEGA ADDITIVES and need to "make room" for it in terms of a lower base stock, you're going to have volatility. Not so much an issue for 5 qualifying laps.
Yep, that's what I was thinking. From a keeping metal parts apart perspective, you can use a really thin oil, so long as the engine can keep sufficient pressure present in the bearing and other critical places. But with the present "technology" of oils, when you get really thin, the oil is going to be prone to evaporation at a rate that would be unacceptable in street use. I'm sure there's more to it than that. OTOH, remember that there are applications out there (but certainly not automotive) that use compressed air as the "lubricant" in their bearings. I wonder what the SAE viscosity of air is? Really, google "air bearings" if you don't believe this.
 
Messages
39,806
Location
Pottstown, PA
 Quote:
From a keeping metal parts apart perspective, you can use a really thin oil, so long as the engine can keep sufficient pressure present in the bearing and other critical places.
After our in service training with XS650 and Shannow providing down-spoken insight into the immutable physics of journal bearings, I think this part isn't all that much of a challenge ..at least imo. Keep oil moving fast enough and cool enough and I think you can throw out the "hardness" of the thin layer thingie. Naturally.. you're not thinking with maximum/high/ultra/whatever slamming it with incredible shocks and whatnot in mind....but just putt-putting around in mundane land. Most of us dwell here, even if we think that we're flogging our engines. I'm not so sure on the other rubbing surfaces and whatnot. I imagine that additives can only carry you so far.
 Originally Posted By: HTSS_TR
If lubeatech gives me 5-6 quarts 0W5 or 0W10, I'll try it in 2004 Honda S2000 for 6mo/6k miles.
The problem (probably) isn't so much that you can't run the stuff (YMMV) it's that it won't stay a <3.8 Cst fluid for long. As far as 0w-10, assuming it is a true <5.6 Cst fluid, shouldn't be a problem. It will probably not be economically sensible. 0w-10 oils are not ready for prime time.
 
Top