How hard is working at autozone?

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Hello, I'm very happy because i just got hired at autozone. It's my very first job and i'm worried about not doing well my tasks. i've never worked before My mechanical knowledge is more than average, i'm an automotive technician, but it's my first time working in a store. Does anyone here work or has worked at autozone? i feel so [censored] nervous.
 
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You are going to do just fine! Just the fact that you ASKED a question like this shows you are concientious and proactive, with a great attitude. They won't expect "perfection", but any employer will want an sincere effort, and I can tell you have it. Your future is bright. Congratuilations.
 
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I worked auto parts for several years. The store part is easy if you can read and count change. Its the dumb customers that will ruin your day. Be prepared to have your ears talked off ,then 15 minutes later yelled at because the customer dont know what they drive and you are supposed to know anyway.
 
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If you are an automotive technician and have some decent people skills you will probably be one of the best employees there. The problem with Autozone is that you aren't required to have automotive knowledge to work there, so many of their employees are just computer punchers. Having knowledge of automotive repair will put you head and shoulders above everyone else. Just make sure to communicate with customers politely and you will be successful. The goal of a retail store is for the customer to leave happy, even if they do not purchase anything. This is what will make them come back. Only offer advice if they ask for it, and don't try to force your opinion on somebody. Once customers realize you are respectable and competent they will more than likely insist on you helping them instead of the other employees.
 
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Well you have a computer to do a lot of the work as far as looking things up. They will most likely have you go through a bunch of training videos so you know how to use their systems to ring up stuff, refunds, order, etc. Remember the majority of people who come into AZ are shadetree mechanics or wannabe shadetree mechanics. I assume not to many mechanics from shops go to AZ. So you may know more than most people who come in. Now is the time to develop your work ethics. Learning to deal with even difficult customers. And give 2 weeks notice when you move on.
 

01rangerxl

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Nothing to be nervous about. All kinds of idiots and lazy people get hired by retail parts stores. Having automotive knowledge is a plus and will help you move up. Showing initiative, keeping things clean, being punctual, etc. will all help a lot too. A lot of people just show up to collect a check and it's not too hard to do better than them. If your manager has half a brain or gives half a [censored], they will notice. The day to day tasks in a retail store are pretty basic and there are procedures for everything. Once you learn the ropes, most things are a piece of cake. The hardest part about working in a retail parts store is dealing with the general public. A lot of people are clueless about cars, but when their car breaks, they are desperate to fix it as cheaply as possible. They want the magic "compruter machine ya'll hook up to my cah" to diagnose everything for them, and if it can't they want you to diagnose it for them, show them exactly how to fix it, and maybe fix it for them. Corporate policy generally mandates that you treat them like people and hold their hand as much as possible because "every customer matters," but it can get frustrating quick. The tool returns with walk ins will drive you nuts too. Hopefully the store you work for will have a boatload of commercial accounts. Stores with lots of commercial accounts are by far the best to work for. Ones that rely mostly on walk in idiot traffic, not so much. Things you may encounter... - "Ay, come look at mah cah, why dis A/C be blowin' out when I hook dis hose up?" (customer holding A/C recharge hose with valve wide open and no can attached) - "I think my Gran Marqueesee need a fruse or some [censored], I don't know why dis [censored] ain't workin', ya'll got that compruter machine?" - "I need a Chebrolet carbratea gakket...it be a sebenty one, or a eighty fo', I don't know..." - "The mechanic say I need a suspension joint...how much dat cost?"
 
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Don't carve anything you say in stone. Don't say for sure it's the alternator as it can be a burned out dash light or fuse, etc. It'll come back to haunt you. Just phrase it like, "we sell a lot of alternators for your car". Reinforce what the customer already believes. I busted tires for a short bit before an injury and there's an added layer or two of "blinders" between your being hands on with a car to see what's going on, and an incentive to think and act quickly if not instantly without gathering all the facts to your own satisfaction. OT I went into an auto parts store to buy spark plugs for my saturn and a snivelly nosed kid tried to talk me out of AC Delcos and into NGKs because I had a "Japanese motor" in my Saturn. I told him I thought they were made in Tennessee. Don't be that kid! If someone wants an econo-master battery for their cadillac, sell it with a smile.
 
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Know your stock. 80% of the people will be OK. 20% of the people, meh. Less than 1%, well good luck with them. Work is good. Good luck in your new job.
 
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To be fair....... NGK's work well in everything IME laugh I just put G Power's in my GPX, (Read: Chevy 305) Never ran better. Even better than the de facto GM plug, the R45TS
 
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Originally Posted By: 01_celica_gt
Please don't say Fram sucks and Valvoline is the best oil and at least I won't think your an idiot working at a parts store.
Do thing's the BITOG way........ Cut a scratch and dent one and put it on display near the register
 
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Did the parts gig for a year at a dealership and got my service certifications in my spare time. If commissioned sales, be honest about quality, and dont be afraid to discount a little when someone comes in a lot. My numbers were double what my coworkers' were...and even with 30% of my sales at cost plus 15...my profit margins destroyed theirs. Dont be afraid to upsell...never put yourself in a position of diagnosing a vegicle, whether you are 100% correct or not.
 
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Originally Posted By: michaelluscher
Originally Posted By: 01_celica_gt
Please don't say Fram sucks and Valvoline is the best oil and at least I won't think your an idiot working at a parts store.
Do thing's the BITOG way........ Cut a scratch and dent one and put it on display near the register
LOL like wix? and explain how BAD the other filters are compared to it?
 
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In addition.... Also...NGK and Denso over made in mexico AC Delco alllllllllllll day. Why would I willingly pay more for a historically inferior product. Defective plug wires...three times in a row...cough cough Made in israel thermostats that open 10 degrees lower than spec....cough cough. Sorry, couldnt resist. Ill try any brand twice. But AC delco parts and Bosch waterpumps are on my NEVER EVER BUY list.
 
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Be a sponge. Listen and soak up the knowledge and learn your job. You'll be dealing with the public and that can require some patience, so when you have difficult customer just smile... They'll he gone soon.
 
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+1 with bvance554. Don't waste too much time on setting the record straight with your so-called "expertise"---knowledge you got from BITOG. Afterall: BITOG is no longer what it used to be---all the good knowledgeable folks are gone and now replaced by mostly snobs, 1/2 arsh narcissistic jacks who think they know them all.... So the spread of use of useless additives of any kind remains, so are the others meaningless snobbery such as full syn oil on strictly utilitarian based, mass-produced automobiles and orange can of death assumption based solely on ill-educated visual observations...., etc. Also one thing of note: learn how to deal/resolve customers issues up front. This will pay the way (and learn proper customer resolution experiences) into better job prospects in the future (if you ever decided to move on to greener pastures. I have spent my past 12 yrs in IT industry serving customer-front (and I still do with my current job, much less though), and they have been proven to be extremely invaluable in terms of learning how to defuse tense situations, negotiate with other folks and find common grounds (or seek happy compromises where both parties can happily live with). Don't bother too much with automotive stuff (really). Technologies don't change much in certain areas and not much meaningful, good technical knowledge to gain when you serve in the customer retail section...learn all the other aspects such as logistics, etc. instead. Q.
 
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Hello, So many here have hit the nails on their heads. My suggestion is to familiarize yourself with front end nomenclature (tie rod ends, sway bar links, control arms etc.) and have them ready to use. Answer any oil question like a dentist doing the same about toothpaste. "Get in there with that brush" the dentist would say. Figure out the oil change equivalent. MY PERSONAL FAVORITE: Say, when a rear shock is clearly leaking and shot. "Do I have to replace both of them?" It's a comfort to know these people have the same number of votes you have come election day. Kira
 
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Originally Posted By: Quest
+1 with bvance554. Don't waste too much time on setting the record straight with your so-called "expertise"---knowledge you got from BITOG. Afterall: BITOG is no longer what it used to be---all the good knowledgeable folks are gone and now replaced by mostly snobs, 1/2 arsh narcissistic jacks who think they know them all.... So the spread of use of useless additives of any kind remains, so are the others meaningless snobbery such as full syn oil on strictly utilitarian based, mass-produced automobiles and orange can of death assumption based solely on ill-educated visual observations...., etc. Also one thing of note: learn how to deal/resolve customers issues up front. This will pay the way (and learn proper customer resolution experiences) into better job prospects in the future (if you ever decided to move on to greener pastures. I have spent my past 12 yrs in IT industry serving customer-front (and I still do with my current job, much less though), and they have been proven to be extremely invaluable in terms of learning how to defuse tense situations, negotiate with other folks and find common grounds (or seek happy compromises where both parties can happily live with). Don't bother too much with automotive stuff (really). Technologies don't change much in certain areas and not much meaningful, good technical knowledge to gain when you serve in the customer retail section...learn all the other aspects such as logistics, etc. instead. Q.
+1
 
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