Have the "Dexcool" coolant flushed out of your GM vehicle...

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Jan 22, 2011
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I never had any problem with Dexcool, it was the junk plastic intake gaskets GM used on their engines. Once you get those junk gaskets replaced, you will not have any more issues.
 
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Oct 26, 2015
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Really there is no such thing as a lifetime coolant, motor oil, transmission fluid or any other fluid for that matter. If you want to keep a vehicle running long you might want to eventually change them all. They all degrade or become contaminated over time. I don't like hearing about a fluid described as lasting a lifetime. It is only something dealers do to make it sound like you will never need to change that transmission fluid or make it sound like that would be the last car you will ever need to buy. It is 100% pure BS!!
 
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Originally Posted by Navi
Pepboys seems best equipped around here to perform these fluid flushes.
Know how I know you're full of sheit?
 
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It is only something dealers do to make it sound like you will never need to change that transmission fluid or make it sound like that would be the last car you will ever need to buy. It is 100% pure BS!! Sorry. Something went wrong. What I meant to say....Manufacturer wants you to believe this is another no/low maintenance feature. Dealer is more than happy to contradict and provide you with more service $$$ like oil change every 3000 miles.
 
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We have a 2006 Buick Lacrosse 3.8l and a 2015 Chevy Sonic . I have dropped the lower radiator hose on both & drained what would come out . Refilled with DEXCOOL . We also have a 1991 Chevy Caprice , that is mostly parked . It has traditional green coolant .
 
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Back in Arizona. Finally
Agree with everything said here about Dexcool and it's history. What did surface recently on an f150 forum was the clogging of heater cores being caused by Fords' version of dexcool. Seems Ford changed to a different coolant and had a TSB on clogged heater cores and switching to the newer coolant. Mass hysteria reigned supreme on the forum with members vowing to swap coolants asap (before getting a plugged core). I blew it off. Only difference noted was that F150s with auto stop/ start apparently have a pump to keep coolant moving when not running and this could be a source of trouble. As such, my ‘18 will cook a chicken with heat on high, with the Ford dexcool in it. Perhaps bdcardinal can weigh in on this as it kinda died down on the f150 forums. I think from ‘19 up the new coolant is used. This is the only recent ding against Dexcool I've heard.
 
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I've been running Dexcool in ALL of my vehicles (not just GM) for 2 decades straight, now. Easier to stock one coolant rather than a different one for every vehicle. Even my current 2011 Crown Victoria has had it since I bought it at 35k miles and one year old (it came with G05). No problems to report.
 
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Originally Posted by Navi
Im in the livery business...used to own a Suburban...know a lot of people with these vehicles. The best thing you can do is get the "Dexcool" coolant flushed and replaced with Peak Global Lifetime. Pepboys seems best equipped around here to perform these fluid flushes. Lets say you keep cruising with Dexcool mysterious problems will happen like a leak in the radiator...a leak in the coolant reservoir...etc... GM has been having problems with Dexcool since they started using it in 1996. https://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2006/08/gm_dexcool.html Dexcool contains an aggressive plasticizer chemical. Peak Global Lifetime is the same coolant minus that chemical.
Your right,the original dexcool started to look bad after only 15 years in my 05 Silverado. You'd think it would last longer than that? Lol I replaced it with yellow all makes all models, along with a new thermostat. It was original thermostat,water pump replaced a couple years ago (some coolant topped up then but no flush) and it has original rad and heater core. I think the myth about dexcool was dispelled a while back. I went with the yellow stuff because of price and availability not because I didn't want to use dexcool.
 
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RI
Originally Posted by double vanos
Agree with everything said here about Dexcool and it's history. What did surface recently on an f150 forum was the clogging of heater cores being caused by Fords' version of dexcool. Seems Ford changed to a different coolant and had a TSB on clogged heater cores and switching to the newer coolant. Mass hysteria reigned supreme on the forum with members vowing to swap coolants asap (before getting a plugged core). I blew it off. Only difference noted was that F150s with auto stop/ start apparently have a pump to keep coolant moving when not running and this could be a source of trouble. As such, my ‘18 will cook a chicken with heat on high, with the Ford dexcool in it. Perhaps bdcardinal can weigh in on this as it kinda died down on the f150 forums. I think from ‘19 up the new coolant is used. This is the only recent ding against Dexcool I've heard.
I just changed the thermostat and coolant on my wife's 2013 fusion. I used the ford OEM coolant concentrate with distilled water and the heat will melt your face. I haven't heard of this problem with ford orange coolantin the cars/gas trucks before.
 

Navi

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I had 3 radiators and 1 radiator reservoir in 2 years. The radiators kept developing a pin hole leak on the plastic section. The radiator reservoir is clear when stock but after a year it was cloudy and leaking. I do know the 2014 and below Suburbans were reliable and durable but the 2015+ are a different beast with lots of problems. On my Lincoln the reservoir is clouded a little bit but on the Suburban it was very cloudy and brittle. Ive never seen a radiator leak until this 2016 Suburban...
 
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Originally Posted by mattd
Originally Posted by double vanos
Agree with everything said here about Dexcool and it's history. What did surface recently on an f150 forum was the clogging of heater cores being caused by Fords' version of dexcool. Seems Ford changed to a different coolant and had a TSB on clogged heater cores and switching to the newer coolant. Mass hysteria reigned supreme on the forum with members vowing to swap coolants asap (before getting a plugged core). I blew it off. Only difference noted was that F150s with auto stop/ start apparently have a pump to keep coolant moving when not running and this could be a source of trouble. As such, my ‘18 will cook a chicken with heat on high, with the Ford dexcool in it. Perhaps bdcardinal can weigh in on this as it kinda died down on the f150 forums. I think from ‘19 up the new coolant is used. This is the only recent ding against Dexcool I've heard.
I just changed the thermostat and coolant on my wife's 2013 fusion. I used the ford OEM coolant concentrate with distilled water and the heat will melt your face. I haven't heard of this problem with ford orange coolantin the cars/gas trucks before.
We had a couple Transit 250 3.7s start plugging the heater core, back flushing fixed the '17 one that was here in Cincinnati. My '18 is actually starting to leak inside, seeping under the floor mat & leaking out the passenger step area-it's going to get a new core & likely switched to Prestone Cor-Guard in the next couple weeks. The Transits run pretty hot, too.
 
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Originally Posted by Navi
I had 3 radiators and 1 radiator reservoir in 2 years. The radiators kept developing a pin hole leak on the plastic section. The radiator reservoir is clear when stock but after a year it was cloudy and leaking. I do know the 2014 and below Suburbans were reliable and durable but the 2015+ are a different beast with lots of problems. On my Lincoln the reservoir is clouded a little bit but on the Suburban it was very cloudy and brittle. Ive never seen a radiator leak until this 2016 Suburban...
Out of pure interest, what is the mileage on the '16, what are the operating conditions and maintenance schedules? Has any other coolant been mixed in for a top off and something along the lines? We have 25 Suburbans at work, with model years ranging from '14 to '17. The '14s are 2500 series, which see a lot of abuse in 125°F weather during the summer, and despite their mileage closing in on 140,000 miles with heavy abuse, there has never been a cooling system issue caused by the coolant. With the exception of stuck open thermostats and water pump replacements through no fault of the coolant and regular wear/tear, the block and coolant passages are all shiny metal. At idle, the mechanical fans don't quite keep up on the 2500s, causing coolant temperatures to raise higher than normal, and the air conditioning sucks, but the systems have no deposits, leaks or other issues.
 
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Originally Posted by Falcon_LS
Originally Posted by Navi
I had 3 radiators and 1 radiator reservoir in 2 years. The radiators kept developing a pin hole leak on the plastic section. The radiator reservoir is clear when stock but after a year it was cloudy and leaking. I do know the 2014 and below Suburbans were reliable and durable but the 2015+ are a different beast with lots of problems. On my Lincoln the reservoir is clouded a little bit but on the Suburban it was very cloudy and brittle. Ive never seen a radiator leak until this 2016 Suburban...
Out of pure interest, what is the mileage on the '16, what are the operating conditions and maintenance schedules? Has any other coolant been mixed in for a top off and something along the lines? We have 25 Suburbans at work, with model years ranging from '14 to '17. The '14s are 2500 series, which see a lot of abuse in 125°F weather during the summer, and despite their mileage closing in on 140,000 miles with heavy abuse, there has never been a cooling system issue caused by the coolant. With the exception of stuck open thermostats and water pump replacements through no fault of the coolant and regular wear/tear, the block and coolant passages are all shiny metal. At idle, the mechanical fans don't quite keep up on the 2500s, causing coolant temperatures to raise higher than normal, and the air conditioning sucks, but the systems have no deposits, leaks or other issues.
Have you replaced the fan clutches? They often fail on those trucks.
 
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Dexcool was never claimed to be lifetime. It is and always has been a 150k mile/5 yr fluid.
 
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I run Dexcool in my 1999 Trans Am. I used distilled water as well. I have not had any sludge problems yet. Nuff said, xtell
 

Navi

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I tend to find the following websites to reflect the real reliability record of the 2015-2020 Suburban - www.carcomplaints.com - Consumer Reports - TrueDelta - Various Youtube videos documenting problems - Repairpal As for my 2016 Suburban things started failing at 40000 miles. The first thing to go was the condenser...next thing to go was the transmisison. There were significant problems. I drive a for hire vehicle but let me point out the people on Consumer Reports and Car Complaints dont all drive for hire. All those websites report major problems. Mine had 3 radiators, 2 condensers, 2 transmissions, a number of shocks and other things. Ive heard of three guys replacing engines, brake booster failure, fuel leaking from beneath... However dont take it from me but review those websites.
 
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I started running Dexcool in my Dodge Hemi recently, and I mixed it with water from my garden hose. I did all that because I wanted my engine to seize up and fail on me. So far it's done nothing but run fine. Count me as another unhappy Dexcool customer. I mean, if it will kill every one else's engine, why won't it kill mine?!?
 
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Originally Posted by The_Nuke
I started running Dexcool in my Dodge Hemi recently, and I mixed it with water from my garden hose. I did all that because I wanted my engine to seize up and fail on me. So far it's done nothing but run fine. Count me as another unhappy Dexcool customer. I mean, if it will kill every one else's engine, why won't it kill mine?!?
LOL Ya just gotta keep on trying harder.
 
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Originally Posted by Navi
I tend to find the following websites to reflect the real reliability record of the 2015-2020 Suburban - www.carcomplaints.com - Consumer Reports - TrueDelta - Various Youtube videos documenting problems - Repairpal As for my 2016 Suburban things started failing at 40000 miles. The first thing to go was the condenser...next thing to go was the transmisison. There were significant problems. I drive a for hire vehicle but let me point out the people on Consumer Reports and Car Complaints dont all drive for hire. All those websites report major problems. Mine had 3 radiators, 2 condensers, 2 transmissions, a number of shocks and other things. Ive heard of three guys replacing engines, brake booster failure, fuel leaking from beneath... However dont take it from me but review those websites.
I do think gm has started making a whole lot of junk in the past 5-8 years. It's not the dexcool causing the rads to go bad that soon though, that's just poor quality parts along with all those other problems.
 
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What I find crazy is failing AC condensers and radiators. Not saying it doesn't happen, but it's not something I have personally seen or heard of in my neck of the woods, where these two particular systems are in constant, heavy use. In the Middle East, fullsize SUVs are GM's bread and butter and have been for decades. Not only are they popular with private buyers, but they're used heavily by police departments, fire departments, close protection agencies, medical centers, municipalities, television crews, military and transportation/livery companies. Even the USMP has a considerable fleet here, and much of our armored vehicles are Suburbans. Fleet vehicles are often poorly maintained after the warranty period and as a result, breakdowns are common. Transmission failure is common on high mileage '15+ vehicles where the fluid is literally black, but it's hardly ever the cooling system or air conditioning unless the vehicle has been in an accident and components have suffered damage. 2015, much like 2007, was a problematic year and I expect 2021 to be the same. There has been a number of recalls; transmission lines and drivetrain vibrations were an issue, along with brakes at some point. The most common repairs are brake pads/rotors, shock absorbers, control arm bushings and tires, but this is extremely common for vehicles driven in motorcades in my case, where we often accelerate at WOT, brake heavily, drive on rumble strips and sometimes jump curbs. The most common problems are with fuel injectors and spark plugs requiring early replacement as a result of bad fuel quality. Coil packs are often not behind if the plugs are replaced periodically. Oil consumption was initially an issue on vehicles with AFM, but a lot of folks opt to have it disabled. Water pumps, usually the bearings, tend to go around the 160,000 km (100,000 mile) mark, as do cooling fans for severe duty vehicles, if not earlier. Transfer cases that haven't been properly serviced are another issue on 4WD vehicles. The only times I have seen radiator failures are on vehicles that have suffered damage to the plastic tanks as a result of a collision, and had them repaired as opposed to replaced. They're often sealed with black silicone, which tends to give up a couple of months down the road, and slowly leaks. Aftermarket radiators also tend to have issues with the transmission cooler.
 
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