Fuel Dilution?

Joined
Sep 30, 2013
Messages
13,600
Location
Indiana
Can fuel dilution, like condensation, be burned off in a 20+ minute highway drive? Or is it there to stay for the remainder of the OCI?
 

dlundblad

Thread starter
Joined
Sep 30, 2013
Messages
13,600
Location
Indiana
Originally Posted By: Olas
Fuel evaporates faster than water!
This answers my question. Thank you. laugh
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2013
Messages
4,597
Location
Manchester, England
Bobbydavro, by 'heavier cuts' do you mean the stuff that turns to varnish in your carb? I'm no chemist but I thought it all evaporated the same, didn't realise there were different fraction in there..
 
Joined
Sep 14, 2010
Messages
7,485
Location
S California
You should keep this in mind if you drive a DI vehicle. No matter what anyone might say about a tiny bit of fuel in the oil not being a problem it would be a good idea to take that longer drive now and then, more often if you plan on keeping the car. A UOA at the point where you suspect the problem to be at its worst and one after a long run might be a worth while investment if you're driving a "keeper". It appears that the general driving public is being recruited to help finish the necessary work of developing DI engines to meet ongoing emission standards. The manufacturers have started the process but there is more work to be done. Quality engine oil is a necessary element in a DI engine. I would run nothing but the best and thankfully there are many good choices.
 
Joined
Aug 20, 2003
Messages
16,693
Location
NE,Ohio
actual fuel in oil can evaporate, but the chemical changes to the oil from the fuel dilution will persist.
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2008
Messages
19,699
Location
Sunny Florida
Originally Posted By: OneEyeJack
It appears that the general driving public is being recruited to help finish the necessary work of developing DI engines to meet ongoing emission standards.
Same as it ever was. We have always been the R&D department. Mfgrs release the tech and then monitor warranty claims, tweak, and continue. It should be noted that much hullaballoo about fuel dilution ignores the fact that very little engine damage has been linked to it.
 
Joined
Nov 28, 2008
Messages
1,007
Location
Oklahoma
I have always wondered this... People always talk about how short trips are so hard on the oil. However, it appears as if one long trip will basically "erase" the effects condensation and fuel dilution. Is this true ?
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2010
Messages
9,783
Location
Saskatoon canada
Originally Posted By: CELICA_XX
I have always wondered this... People always talk about how short trips are so hard on the oil. However, it appears as if one long trip will basically "erase" the effects condensation and fuel dilution. Is this true ?
Yes and no. Yes the fuel will evaporate on longer drives however there might be molecular changes to the oil because of the fuel that was present. I have yet to see a uoa where fuel dilution caused any real harm however I'm sure that depends on the concentration in the oil. If my oil smells like fuel and will light up when exposed to flame I change the oil. Not very scientific however my engines run stellar,and I drive them to the wreckers when I'm finished with them.
 
Joined
Apr 9, 2008
Messages
15,203
Location
Central NY
Originally Posted By: SteveSRT8
Originally Posted By: OneEyeJack
It appears that the general driving public is being recruited to help finish the necessary work of developing DI engines to meet ongoing emission standards.
Same as it ever was. We have always been the R&D department. Mfgrs release the tech and then monitor warranty claims, tweak, and continue. It should be noted that much hullaballoo about fuel dilution ignores the fact that very little engine damage has been linked to it.
Both of my vehicles had the end-user R&D done before I bought them! Upside to buying 10 year old used or brand new but low tech.
 
Joined
Sep 14, 2010
Messages
7,485
Location
S California
Originally Posted By: SteveSRT8
Originally Posted By: OneEyeJack
It appears that the general driving public is being recruited to help finish the necessary work of developing DI engines to meet ongoing emission standards.
Same as it ever was. We have always been the R&D department. Mfgrs release the tech and then monitor warranty claims, tweak, and continue. It should be noted that much hullaballoo about fuel dilution ignores the fact that very little engine damage has been linked to it.
We'll just have to wait a couple more years. The people that rotate cars frequently don't need to be bothered, it's after the factory warranty expires that we'll start seeing results. Today many cars out there should be considered a gamble to drive past the factory warranty and a DI car might be one of them. For some of those cars the expense of a minor repair could go a long way toward purchasing an older daily driver. Buying one of these out of warranty cars might stick you with the repairs that were recently skipped.
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2012
Messages
14,771
Location
Kendall, FL
Quite a few 2010 2.4L Sonata's on the Hyundai boards with over 150k miles, running plain ole dino meeting spec - 0 issues. I'm sure this is the case with the vast majority of today's GDi Makes and Models, with an odd-ball thrown in here and there showing signs of trouble.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 18, 2013
Messages
496
Location
Australia
Originally Posted By: bobbydavro
The light ends will evaporate quickly. However the heavier cuts can take much longer and tend to accumulate in the sump.
Quite right.
 
Joined
Mar 18, 2013
Messages
496
Location
Australia
Originally Posted By: CELICA_XX
I have always wondered this... People always talk about how short trips are so hard on the oil. However, it appears as if one long trip will basically "erase" the effects condensation and fuel dilution. Is this true ?
Like Clevy says. The answer is yes and no. Some damage to the oil is permanent even after the contaminants have evaporated. Most labs deem fuel dilution to be a significant problem at concentrations over 2.5-3% in Used Oil Analysis.
 
Joined
May 26, 2003
Messages
772
Location
Ohio
Even if burning off in the manner suggested is effective, in most cases the source of the problem still exists. So unless you regularly drive the required distance/speed, fuel dilution will remain essentially ever-present.
 

dlundblad

Thread starter
Joined
Sep 30, 2013
Messages
13,600
Location
Indiana
I am mainly concerned about fuel dilution in the winter months when I let my engine warm up. I still cant bring myself to just drive a vehicle cold on a 0 degree morning.
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2008
Messages
19,699
Location
Sunny Florida
Originally Posted By: wemay
Quite a few 2010 2.4L Sonata's on the Hyundai boards with over 150k miles, running plain ole dino meeting spec - 0 issues. I'm sure this is the case with the vast majority of today's GDi Makes and Models, with an odd-ball thrown in here and there showing signs of trouble.
While a dedicated brand forum may provide some interesting vehicle specific info it is hardly a place for any balanced information. Very small numbers of upset folks frequently light up these boards with complaints, thus leading others to conclude that Brand X is garbage and such, when in reality it is exactly as you suggest. The overwhelming majority of DI vehicles are running fine...
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2010
Messages
2,094
Location
.
Originally Posted By: wemay
Quite a few 2010 2.4L Sonata's on the Hyundai boards with over 150k miles, running plain ole dino meeting spec - 0 issues. I'm sure this is the case with the vast majority of today's GDi Makes and Models, with an odd-ball thrown in here and there showing signs of trouble.
This may be exactly right - and as a DI owner I hope it is. On the other hand, 150k miles in 4 years probably equates to a lot of highway driving, which may mitigate whatever fuel dilution effects exist.
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2006
Messages
2,435
Location
Mizzou-land
If you can get fuel evaporated soon after contamination of the oil, there are no permanent changes to the oil other than the retained non-volatile additives and the heaviest fractions of the fuel. Think of these components as the residue left behind after most of the evaporation. If the fuel remains in the oil for a long period, you may have some issues. For example, if the fuel has a significant component that is water loving (ethanol for example), you can get some other issues related to water, additive removal, and oxidation of metals. A related, previous discussion can be found at the link below: http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubb...true#Post680042
 
Top