DuPont now selling a Teflon-based spray lubricant.

cos

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That is old news but the bad news is that while it was a great chain lube for motorcycles it was only sold at Lowes and they now no longer carry it.
 
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Hethaerto

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Here's a clip from an engine remanufacturing company called Hiperformer out in Washington. They warranty their engines for 7 years or 100,000 miles. They talk of using a Teflon-based lube to coat bearings in while building an engine to prevent a dry start. From their site: "The cylinder block is then moved to the assembler, here the main bearings (tri metal only) are installed, a special prelude called AL22 (cost $155.00 a gallon) is used to coat the bearings. This lubricant is a Teflon coating substance that reduces the danger of a dry engine start (no oil). The crank is then assembled into the block. The pistons are then coated with AL22 and slid into the correct cylinders and attached to the crankshaft with the tri metal bearing and more AL22. A new camshaft and timing components are installed. The cylinder heads are now installed on the short block. All new rocker arms, hold down bolts, push rods and lifters are then installed to complete the long block." Hiperformer
 

Hethaerto

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 Originally Posted By: cos
That is quite old news and worse yet, it was a great chain lube for motorcycles but was only sold at Lowes and they no longer carry it.
I finally found a reference for DuPont selling Teflon lubes and it was by accident. I wonder why Lowes stopped carrying it?
 
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I fail to see the benefit of putting Teflon 'in' anything. Teflon is only effective when baked onto a surface. I thought all this teflon business was debunked with the rise and fall of Slick 50.
 
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 Originally Posted By: ViragoBry
I fail to see the benefit of putting Teflon 'in' anything. Teflon is only effective when baked onto a surface. I thought all this teflon business was debunked with the rise and fall of Slick 50.
My sentiments exactly. While the lubricant that actually has the Teflon might be good, I doubt it's the Teflon. Teflon takes an enourmous amount of heat before it will actually bond to anything.
 
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This product has been on the market for years. I use it has a chain lube for my bicycle. I still have the first can I bought at Lowes.
 
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If teflon is good when attached [baked on] a surface, why is it no good when in suspension [an oil] and is still between two sliding parts? It would seem to have benefits.
 
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 Originally Posted By: Hethaerto
I wonder if DuPont will ever branch out into automotive apps?
You remember Quaker State High Mileage Slick 50? Slick 50 = Fail.
 
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 Originally Posted By: mechtech2
If teflon is good when attached [baked on] a surface, why is it no good when in suspension [an oil] and is still between two sliding parts? It would seem to have benefits.
Here is what DuPont has to say about it... How do DuPont™ Teflon™ Lubricants and Greases compare to other brands? All DuPont™ Lubricants and Greases contain Teflon® fluoropolymer, which lowers the coefficient of friction, and improves longevity, water resistance and temperature stability. What is Teflon®? Teflon® is a brand name and a registered trademark of DuPont. Teflon® is known for being non-stick, stain resistant, durable and reliable. Teflon® fluoropolymer is used as a lubricant additive to deliver longer lubricant life, higher temperature stability, better resistance to water and lower coefficient of friction. To those who profer that Teflon must be bonded to a surface at extreme temperatures in order to have a benefit, care to explain how they bond it to fabric?
 
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 Originally Posted By: sunfire
 Originally Posted By: Hethaerto
I wonder if DuPont will ever branch out into automotive apps?
You remember Quaker State High Mileage Slick 50? Slick 50 = Fail.
How about this... DuPont Teflon Greases
 
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Teflon is baked onto cooking surfaces at around 600 degrees, in a vacuum. If you truly believe that Teflon is bonded to fabric, I have some oceanfront property in Plano for you to look at. At best, PTFE is mixed in a carrier and dried into fabric(although I'm not familiar with this magic Teflon fabric you mention), and it's not the same thing.
 

Kestas

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Teflon - apart from frying pan surfaces - is an excellent engineering material with good lubrication properties when properly used. I often see it engineered in sliding applications. DuPont did a disservice to the general public (and to teflon itself) when they marketed Slick 50 with their outrageous claims.
 
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 Originally Posted By: ViragoBry
Teflon is baked onto cooking surfaces at around 600 degrees, in a vacuum. If you truly believe that Teflon is bonded to fabric, I have some oceanfront property in Plano for you to look at. At best, PTFE is mixed in a carrier and dried into fabric(although I'm not familiar with this magic Teflon fabric you mention), and it's not the same thing.
You've made the mistake of assuming that the Teflon material must be bonded to a solid substrate at a high temperature in order for it to achieve its properties. This is simply not the case, despite the apparently popular opinion around here. Do a little research on the material "polytetrafluoroethylene" (as well as the related materials "perfluoroalkoxy" and "fluorinated ethylene propylene") and you'll find the facts are quite different from the opinion you've formed. As for the "magic" fabrics with Teflon, have a look at DuPont Teflon products. They run the gamut from the cookware usage that everyone fixates on, to uses in apparel, technical fabrics, paints and transportation products. I hope your knowledge of the real estate business is better than your grasp of the usage of Teflon branded chemicals, or you'll never move that plot in Plano. Cheers
 
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I've been using Tri-Flow on firearms since the '80's. The NRA had some very favorable test results regarding rust resistance in their 24 hour salt spray test.
 
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