Didn't know a fork could make this kind of diff

Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Messages
3,756
Location
CA
A little history, I bought my Specialized Hardrock HRXC new for about $500. I hadn't owned a bike in 10years so this was a good starter bike, the cheapest that I would consider worthy, or better than the Walmart/Target stuff. As always, I can't leave anything alone so it's got the BB7 big brakes, levers, chain, crankset, tires, light, etc. I've been looking at forks, both for performance and for the fact that I'm running a 203mm front brake. I've been looking at several and one was a Rock Shox Revelation with all the features. As luck would have it, a co-worker who has 7 bikes has to get rid of a few plus some parts. I ended up getting the 2008 Revelation barely used for $200. I think retail was in the $550 range and I could never justify spending more money on the fork than I did the bike. However, $200 works. The difference is unbelievable. I did not expect this much of a change. The ride is so much more controlled over bumps, the tire stays in contact with the ground so much better over rocks and bumps. Over low speed bumps during turns, what used to make me stop or nearly eat it, it now goes over them safer. Anyone else have experience with how this fork stacks up with others?
 
Joined
May 29, 2009
Messages
610
Location
Afghanistan
basically the fork will let you fly downhill over rutted terrain, and without a fork this would be very dangerous. i could barely believe the difference just a flex stem made. u can get a rock shox sid on the net used for 125 - 200$. that's what i just did. i got a cheap bike with aluminum frame for 100$ and put a 200$ fork on it. now it rides like a 1000$ bike.
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2008
Messages
4,998
Location
Milwaukee, WI
I noticed a huge difference headed the other direction. I had a nice Answer fork on my bike, and I had it locked out and went about 6 inches in the air and everything let go. I was about 25 miles into a 40 mile offroad race, and the oil was slowly leaving me. At a rest stop I filled it up and made it the rest of the way. But it was empty by the end, and not worth fixing. So, when I got back I bought the second or third cheapest rock shox because it was light. And it is terrible. At this point I'm considering a rigid front fork. My setup is a bit different, I stick to rim breaks and everything else is as little as possible that would add weight. So yeah, the difference can be night and day. And don't lock your fork out unless you're climbing at less than a few miles an hour!
 
Joined
Dec 21, 2008
Messages
5,628
Location
London, ON, Canada
The Rev is a good fork.. I had its XC brother the Reba Race on my last bike.. same dual air design. I love RS dual air forks. Super plush. My new bike has a Fox F140RL and I like it too. Also had an F120RL on one of my previous bikes. Same deal of goodness. Any dual air fork in that range is excellent really.. But yes, a good fork makes piles of difference!
 
Joined
Dec 12, 2006
Messages
2,497
Location
NY, NY
When I originally switched to suspension forks, it was kinda out of necessity. My right shoulder was killing me after an off road ride on my rigid bike. I started with a Manitou Two, then a three, then an EFC. I rode that EFC for like 15 years. Last year, I got a Specialized Stumpjumper FSR 29er with a RS Reba. WOW!! My first air fork. What an awesome ride. I love when I'm in a real remote area and I can hear the little sst sst coming from the fork as it works the terrain.
 
Joined
Nov 6, 2002
Messages
4,844
Location
Saskatchewan
I'm not familiar with the newest models of any forks, but there certainly is a huge difference between an oil lubricated and damped fork with stiff stanchions compared to the typical cheap model that flexes, bottoms and tops out easily, springs back quickly, and has play in the slider bushings. I'd much rather go rigid than cheap when it comes to a suspension fork!
 

BuickGN

Thread starter
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Messages
3,756
Location
CA
 Originally Posted By: rpn453
I'm not familiar with the newest models of any forks, but there certainly is a huge difference between an oil lubricated and damped fork with stiff stanchions compared to the typical cheap model that flexes, bottoms and tops out easily, springs back quickly, and has play in the slider bushings. I'd much rather go rigid than cheap when it comes to a suspension fork!
It's funny, the co-worker I bought it from said the same thing today.
 
Joined
Sep 6, 2015
Messages
6,235
Location
Kalifornia Kollective
I have a Marzocchi dual air on my K2 and there is no comparing to a spring and cheap dampening. Air is progressive as the volume decreases, weighs nothing and works. Springs can be progressive, but usually aren't ... Adjustable dampening is the only way to go, and lock-out is very nice laugh
 
Top