Degreacing new motorbike tires

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Oct 17, 2019
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So in the next days i`m getting brand new tires for my bike, all two of them. Now i know that new tires can be slick/greasy straight out of the shop and there is some mileage needs to be driven to break them in. However i`m playing with the though to jump start the break in process by washing my tires with automotive degreaser/detergent in hope to make them less slick to begin with. Anyone tried that out before with any luck, or is it pointless?
 
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They aren't greasy. It's just new, un-scuffed rubber. They're your tires, but I wouldn't let automotive degreaser anywhere near my tires. My advice from having had too many M/C tires to count, is to just ride and take it easy until the tires are scuffed in and up to temp.
 
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The latest crop of motorcycle tires are so good even that coating is hard to loose grip. Unless your throwing them on and immediately going full lean while wide open your going to be fine and not slide any whatsoever. I go through several new sets per year and have not had any issues. This being on a Yamaha R1 and R6 which are 2 of the latest greatest sport bikes.also washing with a degreaser is not going to do anything helpful. The coating has to be worn off as it is the outer part of the rubber.
 
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They aren't greasy. It's just new, un-scuffed rubber. They're your tires, but I wouldn't let automotive degreaser anywhere near my tires. My advice from having had too many M/C tires to count, is to just ride and take it easy until the tires are scuffed in and up to temp.
Especially not a motorcycle tire.
 
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Part of the "scuffing in" process is getting the rider used to the handling of the new tire. Even when you replace with the same brand and model, the new tire has a new/un-worn rounded profile that will affect handling.
Just take it easy for the first few hundred miles and all will be well with the tires (and the rider).
 
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I do the same thing to my new motorcycle tires as I do to all my vehicle new tires and that is = nothing. Never understood the concern.
As soon as you ride on pavement, hundreds of pounds of pressure is grinding that tire into the road, what more can one want?
 
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So in the next days i`m getting brand new tires for my bike, all two of them. Now i know that new tires can be slick/greasy straight out of the shop and there is some mileage needs to be driven to break them in. However i`m playing with the though to jump start the break in process by washing my tires with automotive degreaser/detergent in hope to make them less slick to begin with. Anyone tried that out before with any luck, or is it pointless?
No degreaser as others have mentioned.

That said, when I bought my WRX the tires were very slick with something. I mean seriously dangerously slick. It was raining on the way home from the dealer and my daughter wanted to ride with me, I could hardly use the throttle.

Is there some visible coating? Yes you can and should wash them.

To this day I am sure of the dealer idiots spraying the tires with something stupid but unsure if the tires also had some mold release or other slick substance. I actually dismounted the wheels, and scrubbed the tires with Simple Green and a couple other plastic/rubber safe vinyl cleaners., and repeat. Mounted them back up and tires were perfect. Lasted until I sold the WRX.
 
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I use to do a side gig mounting and balancing motorcycle tires out of my garage and for the hundreds that I did, I always cautioned them as you are inquiring about not to grab a handful of throttle the first time out. Heat is your friend and suggest you find a highway and just ride to accelerate the mold release compound on the tires to evaporate off. Take the off ramps slow and gradually increase lean angles for the first hundred miles or so.
 

kebabaluba

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I appreciate all answers and the only thing i will do is to take it slow and drive the bike. Surely new tires can`t be as bad as mine now. Front tire is dated 3805, that is week 38 in 2005. Holy molly that i have lived long enough to this point :oops::unsure:
 
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What we are concerned about are called mold release agents so I asked the manufactures about their mold release agents and tire break in...

Dunlop
Thank you for taking the time to contact us with your Dunlop
motorcycle tire questions. Dunlop Motorcycle Tire does NOT use a "mold
releasing agent" during the production of our tires. When new tires
are fitted, they should not be subjected to maximum power, abrupt
lean-over or hard cornering until a reasonable run-in distance of
approximately 100 miles has been covered. This will permit the rider
to become accustomed to the feel of the new tires or tire combination,
find the edge, and achieve optimum road grip for a range of speeds,
acceleration and handling use. Be sure to check and adjust inflation
pressure to recommended levels after the tire cools for at least three
(3) hours following run-in. Remember, new tires will have a very
different contact patch and lean-over edge. New tires, mixing a new
tire with an used tire, and mixing tread pattern combinations require
careful ride evaluations.


Bridgestone
Break-in Period
In order for your new tire(s) to provide optimum performance, tires
should be ridden very cautiously for the first 100 miles in order for
the tread surface to be “Scuffed-In” and work properly. Directly after
new tires are mounted, sudden acceleration, maximum braking and hard
cornering must be avoided. This will allow the rider to adjust to the
“Feel” and handling characteristics of the new tire and for the new
tire to be “Scuffed-In” correctly in order to achieve optimum grip
level.


Pirelli
Hello
Pirelli does not use mold release. Tires are shiny because the general
buying public demands that visually a tire look cool, smooth, shiny,
and new when they shop for tires in the rack at the dealer. We rely on
the smoothness of the mold to get this appearance and to help the tire
let go from the mold during production.

I like to say tires are like new shoes, MX boots, or a leather jacket
as they need the proper break in time. Regarding getting heat into
tires this follows the same idea, only time and friction will put the
heat in. I have attached a copy of the brochure so you can read about
break in suggestions in the technical area. Ride safe

Michellin
Thank you for your email. We appreciate the opportunity to serve you.
Concerning your question, Michelin has a mold release agent on all
motorcycle tires. This will cause the tire to be slippery in the first
few miles, but that goes away after the tire is scrubbed in. This
normally occurs in the first 25-50 miles or so. Until then, the rider
should use caution in riding the tire at accelerated speeds. Michelin
always recommends obeying the speed limits and using care whenever
riding.
****************************************************************************

My advice is you don't need to risk the bendy bits to scrub in new tires to the edge... just
practice your 25 ft circles nice and slow so you can save it...

25ftcirclerc45jpg-jpg.35719
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 26, 2009
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UK
Never cleaned/ degreased my bike tyre since I started riding in 2003.

I would however take it easy for the 1st 50~100 miles to allow the tyre shape itself to the rim while gradually increasing the lean angle to bed in the edges making sure they run at the recommended pressure & not under inflated
 
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Jun 5, 2013
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OP, have you been out yet on the new tires? What tires are you running? In any case...

Consensus, which you seem to have decided upon is to ride! Who wouldn't rather be riding their bike initially breaking them in to accomplish the exact same thing.

My first set of the Dunlop Roadsmart 3 had a vague feeling in deliberately easy riding the first 25 or 30 miles. No question. The second set a couple years later came in very quickly. Recently installed a set of Roadsmart 2 tires on the same bike. Yes, it's an older tire design however they are of new manufacture. Enjoyed them on the initial ride, took it easy, and the next ride was a 200 mile day. Tires are performing as well as any set of tires I've had in terms of consistent cornering feel and ride quality. Not knowing what tires you are running, most any sport touring tire from a known manufacturer is going to perform as well as most of us are ever gonna need on the street. I admit, I've been a tire snob as of lately and always looked for a deal on the latest and greatest however after wearing out sets of the latest and greatest over the years, they're all really good tires.

I'm gonna be honest with myself and I think most here are honest with ourselves as well, the circumstances a tire would break loose are avoided with common sense. IMO, if a rider is that determined to start riding tires hard out of the gate, that's their issue all on its own with respect to riding on public roads with that mindset.
 

kebabaluba

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Joined
Oct 17, 2019
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Close to arctic circle
OP, have you been out yet on the new tires? What tires are you running? In any case...

Consensus, which you seem to have decided upon is to ride! Who wouldn't rather be riding their bike initially breaking them in to accomplish the exact same thing.

My first set of the Dunlop Roadsmart 3 had a vague feeling in deliberately easy riding the first 25 or 30 miles. No question. The second set a couple years later came in very quickly. Recently installed a set of Roadsmart 2 tires on the same bike. Yes, it's an older tire design however they are of new manufacture. Enjoyed them on the initial ride, took it easy, and the next ride was a 200 mile day. Tires are performing as well as any set of tires I've had in terms of consistent cornering feel and ride quality. Not knowing what tires you are running, most any sport touring tire from a known manufacturer is going to perform as well as most of us are ever gonna need on the street. I admit, I've been a tire snob as of lately and always looked for a deal on the latest and greatest however after wearing out sets of the latest and greatest over the years, they're all really good tires.

I'm gonna be honest with myself and I think most here are honest with ourselves as well, the circumstances a tire would break loose are avoided with common sense. IMO, if a rider is that determined to start riding tires hard out of the gate, that's their issue all on its own with respect to riding on public roads with that mindset.
I got myself Michelin Road 5 tires as they were recommended for the climate and weather where i live. I needed the best tires for rain weather and thats what i got, or so what the shop who fitted them said :) Got to say i`m happy with them, the bikes rides great, plenty of grip. Also it was no big deal run them in either, was a hot day when i got my bike back, rode it for quite many miles that day :)
 
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Jun 29, 2021
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28
Dont use any chemicals on your motorcycle tires, run the recommended pressures for your bike, not the max pressure listed on the tire, take the first few miles easy, check the pressures often.
 
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