Blending #1 & #2 diesel

Messages
1,815
Location
South Dakota
A friend has a son that runs semis. He said that his son was told by the fuel supplier that #1 & #2 diesel fuel separates and doesn't blend. So his son just runs #2 with additives. Anyone else heard this in regards to recent diesel fuel products?
 
Messages
842
Location
Daytona Beach
Years ago, when our tanker fleet in PA needed to deliver in sub zero temps, we would always blend about 15% #1 (K1 kero) into a tank of fuel. It mixed just fine back then and kept the fuel from jelling.
As time went on, many changes were made in the diesel fuels. Red dye, biodiesel, lubricity additive, etc. It is possible that some of these changes and additives don't work too well with current fuels. I think the biggest risk today would be reduced dye concentration (big fine) and reduced lubricity concentration, which is NOT good for the injectors.
I'd try to avoid the practice today, engines are much too sensitive to fuel quality and contamination.
 
Messages
4,942
Location
Kansas
We recently had an overnight low of -31° and diesel will gel at temperatures much higher. The diesel suppliers have been blending $1 and #2 during the winter months for decades to avoid or at least slow down the diesel gelling. I've never heard from any supplier around here that #1 and #2 separates, and with the movement of a vehicle on the road or even the vibration from an engine, I can't imagine it could separate too long.
 
Messages
10,883
Location
Cincinnati, OH, USA
In days of old, 500 PPM or higher sulfur concentrations, #1 (or K1/kerosene), or even, GASP, GASOLINE would be added to #2 to improve cold flow(!) In these days of HEUI and CR diesels, and touchy DPF systems, you don’t want to be messing around with fuel, except to add an approved antigel (like Power Service white bottle, 911, or Stanadyne). Too many big $$$ parts to ruin. If the suppliers add #1, they know how much extra lubricity additive to add, and how to keep it mixed.
 
Messages
17,241
Location
Upper Midwest
Nearly all hydrocarbons are miscible, especially those that have similar molecular chain lengths like these.

More garbage advice from someone who should know better. A lot better.
 
Messages
1,559
Location
Ca
Never had a diesel fuel issue in 40 years of of running them from sea level to 10,000 feet, summer and winter. ymmv
 
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