Best 6.7 Powerstroke Oil

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Just run Delo. In Washington state, the state troopers are getting primed to inspect and fine deleted trucks. $10,000 fine I hear.
 
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If deleted, best IMHO is:

SAE 15W-40 Heavy-Duty Diesel and Marine Oil AME - AMSOIL
What does it matter if deleted. Any newer diesel should be running 5w40 not 15w40 deletes or not.
 
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Wow how ignorant
And why is that. There is all kinds of information showing the wear rates of Thea 6.7 using 15w40 with temps below 40 degrees. The 5w40 is going to be bettered on cold starts. The most wear that occurs in an engine is on cold starts. The 5w flows way faster than the 15w
 
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And why is that. There is all kinds of information showing the wear rates of Thea 6.7 using 15w40 with temps below 40 degrees. The 5w40 is going to be bettered on cold starts. The most wear that occurs in an engine is on cold starts. The 5w flows way faster than the 15w
Well first off a 5W rated oil will only be better on cold starts when the temperature is somewhere around freezing or below. If it's not that cold then they will perform in a similar fashion.

Also where is this information showing wear rates on those engines? Not UOA which do not show wear rates.

And lastly the most wear does not occur on cold starts. The oil has more than a sufficient MOFT when cold, no oil is ever too thin in a cold start. Thin oil causes wear not thick oil. The wear occurs during warmup when the additives have not reached a sufficient temperature. But the film thickness at startup is much more than adequate regardless of the winter rating of the oil. And a thicker oil will warm up faster than a thinner one.

Oh and flow is irrelevant except to the pickup tube of the oil pump. Unless you are below the proper temperature for the winter rating where it cannot be pumped then it will flow.
 
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Well first off a 5W rated oil will only be better on cold starts when the temperature is somewhere around freezing or below. If it's not that cold then they will perform in a similar fashion.

Also where is this information showing wear rates on those engines? Not UOA which do not show wear rates.

And lastly the most wear does not occur on cold starts. The oil has more than a sufficient MOFT when cold, no oil is ever too thin in a cold start. Thin oil causes wear not thick oil. The wear occurs during warmup when the additives have not reached a sufficient temperature. But the film thickness at startup is much more than adequate regardless of the winter rating of the oil. And a thicker oil will warm up faster than a thinner one.

Oh and flow is irrelevant except to the pickup tube of the oil pump. Unless you are below the proper temperature for the winter rating where it cannot be pumped then it will flow.
You don’t have any idea what you are talking about bud. There is a reason vehicles today use an all
Season oil and not a viscosity chart. Most passenger car engines use a 0w. The reason for that is for cold start period. It don’t matter if your in 0 degree weather or 90 degree weather. 0 or 5w flows a lot quicker than a 10 or 15w. I don’t think you understand oil flow and pressure. As far as the wear rates they are real world as I have an uncle who works at a Ford dealership in Texas. With this past winter storm they had with temperatures at 20 degrees They had 6.7’s come in with spun rod bearings and such due to the 15w40 oil. There are also independent shops as well that saw this. Also I own a 2019 F-350SRW and on my cap it says extreme duty 5w40 and for normal service use 10w30. Nowhere on cap does it say use 15w40. I also asked that same uncle regarding oil for this truck when I bought it and he said stay away from 15w40, as this engine is designed to work more with the 5w40.
 
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You don’t have any idea what you are talking about bud. There is a reason vehicles today use an all
Season oil and not a viscosity chart. Most passenger car engines use a 0w. The reason for that is for cold start period. It don’t matter if your in 0 degree weather or 90 degree weather. 0 or 5w flows a lot quicker than a 10 or 15w. I don’t think you understand oil flow and pressure. As far as the wear rates they are real world as I have an uncle who works at a Ford dealership in Texas. With this past winter storm they had with temperatures at 20 degrees They had 6.7’s come in with spun rod bearings and such due to the 15w40 oil. There are also independent shops as well that saw this. Also I own a 2019 F-350SRW and on my cap it says extreme duty 5w40 and for normal service use 10w30. Nowhere on cap does it say use 15w40. I also asked that same uncle regarding oil for this truck when I bought it and he said stay away from 15w40, as this engine is designed to work more with the 5w40.
Yeah okay.
 
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Well first off a 5W rated oil will only be better on cold starts when the temperature is somewhere around freezing or below. If it's not that cold then they will perform in a similar fashion.

Also where is this information showing wear rates on those engines? Not UOA which do not show wear rates.

And lastly the most wear does not occur on cold starts. The oil has more than a sufficient MOFT when cold, no oil is ever too thin in a cold start. Thin oil causes wear not thick oil. The wear occurs during warmup when the additives have not reached a sufficient temperature. But the film thickness at startup is much more than adequate regardless of the winter rating of the oil. And a thicker oil will warm up faster than a thinner one.

Oh and flow is irrelevant except to the pickup tube of the oil pump. Unless you are below the proper temperature for the winter rating where it cannot be pumped then it will flow.
Oh and thinner oil is better than thicker oil. This horse has been beaten to death. Oil is responsible as well for carrying the heat away. Thicker oil slows the flow which intern causes more heat. Thinner oil flows faster to dissipate the heat. Higher oil pressure is not better either especially with these new variable oil pumps.
 
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It sounds like there are some massive design problems in that engine. Yes, as I stated if the winter rating is not appropriate for the expected starting conditions then you're using the wrong oil. One thing they get completely wrong (and many people who are ignorant of oil grades do) is that there is no "5 weight" oil nor a "10 weight" oil. 5W-40, 10W-40 and 15W-40 oil are all 40-grade oils, you pick a winter rating that is appropriate.

That paragraph you posted above in response to my comments is nearly completely incorrect. For one thing, no engine is "designed to work with" a specific winter rating, this shows that you don't understand oil grades whatsoever. To keep yourself from continuing to type nonsense try using the Widman calculator to plot the viscosity of a 5W-40 vs. a 15W-40.

Thinner oil facilitates pumpability and increases fuel economy. But as long as the oil can be pumped you're never going to overcome a design failure with the oil.

You're still stuck on flow which is not the problem.
 
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It sounds like there are some massive design problems in that engine. Yes, as I stated if the winter rating is not appropriate for the expected starting conditions then you're using the wrong oil. One thing they get completely wrong (and many people who are ignorant of oil grades do) is that there is no "5 weight" oil nor a "10 weight" oil. 5W-40, 10W-40 and 15W-40 oil are all 40-grade oils, you pick a winter rating that is appropriate.

That paragraph you posted above in response to my comments is nearly completely incorrect. For one thing, no engine is "designed to work with" a specific winter rating, this shows that you don't understand oil grades whatsoever. To keep yourself from continuing to type nonsense try using the Widman calculator to plot the viscosity of a 5W-40 vs. a 15W-40.

Thinner oil facilitates pumpability and increases fuel economy. But as long as the oil can be pumped you're never going to overcome a design failure with the oil.

You're still stuck on flow which is not the problem.

the information is in section 2. Feel free to read it all.
 
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Lol how did I know you were headed here.

The King of Idiocy website. You have no clue whatsoever about anything and that demonstrated it.
No bud. You don’t understand how engines, or lubrication works. I was taught at a young age in my mechanics classes about all this. I happened to find this website as it separates all the BS that people post on this bob is the oil guy website. It sounds to me like you are stuck in the old myths and habits and can’t accept change. I bet you still change oil at 3000 miles too.
 

BeerCan

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Hilarious. The old myths die and the new ones are created.

Ford has no issues with using 15w40 and recommends it in the manual. A big reason they like to recommend Xw40 ove 10w30 is when using bio. Bio dilutes more and this is one of the reasons. You are pretty far off base here wrt how lubrication works

from the Ford 6.7 manual
Screenshot 2021-03-07 at 10.28.02 AM.jpg





Screenshot 2021-03-07 at 10.26.15 AM.jpg
 
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Hilarious. The old myths die and the new ones are created.

Ford has no issues with using 15w40 and recommends it in the manual. A big reason they like to recommend Xw40 ove 10w30 is when using bio. Bio dilutes more and this is one of the reasons. You are pretty far off base here wrt how lubrication works

from the Ford 6.7 manual
View attachment 48208




View attachment 48209
You a day late and a dollar short on the 15w40 oil. If you watch the video posted above you will see about the 15w40. Over the road trucks don’t even use 15w40 anymore. That’s an old and dying weight of oil. Newer diesels don’t use it it’s all moved to 10w30 and 5w40. My VW TDI’s don’t even use a 40wt anymore. They went from 5w40 to 5w30 and now 0w30 as VW is not contracted with with castrol anymore. Moved on to Mobil and that’s what they bottle now is 0w30.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Hilarious. The old myths die and the new ones are created.

Ford has no issues with using 15w40 and recommends it in the manual. A big reason they like to recommend Xw40 ove 10w30 is when using bio. Bio dilutes more and this is one of the reasons. You are pretty far off base here wrt how lubrication works

from the Ford 6.7 manual
View attachment 48208




View attachment 48209
Oh and by the way Japan has been using 0w16 and 0w8 oil or quite a long time. So please stop it.
 
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Sometimes it’s really difficult to discern whether people actually believe the nonsense they post or whether they’re just doing it to get attention.

It’s just so over the top and so completely wrong that it’s hard to tell. At first you think you’re having a rational and technical discussion but then it dawns on you that’s not what’s happening at all.
 
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