Are these spark plugs shot?

carg618

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Heat range is how the spark plug dissipates heat to the cylinder head. A colder plug transmits more heat to the head and the tip stays cooler. A hotter plug retains more heat.

A hotter plug might help with oil burning deposits.

If a 7090 ( BKR5EGP) plug is stock for your engine, Then a hotter plug by 1 range would be a 7092 ( BKR6EGP).
So is the last number key to the heat range? So a 2500 plug for example runs cooler than a 2509 plug?
 
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So is the last number key to the heat range? So a 2500 plug for example runs cooler than a 2509 plug?
I would look at the ngk plug number I.E. BRK5 4 is a hotter plug.

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carg618

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I would look at the ngk plug number I.E. BRK5 vs BRK6. 6 is a hotter plug.

View attachment 129099
Ok. Rock auto has a thing where it shows that particular plug hear range. Most iridium plugs show at 16 heat range where copper and platnum plugs show at 5 heat range. So is 5 good in this case? Because the chart shows bigger numbers being colder so I’m confused.

Also do copper plugs have worse performance or mpg vs platnum?
 
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Ok. Rock auto has a thing where it shows that particular plug hear range. Most iridium plugs show at 16 heat range where copper and platnum plugs show at 5 heat range. So is 5 good in this case? Also do copper plugs have worse performance or mpg vs platnum?
Sorry i typed it wrong, A lower number is hotter! There may not be a hotter plug, let me search.
 

carg618

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I’m
Sorry i typed it wrong, A lower number is hotter!
So when I look on rock auto, it only shows ngk plugs with a 5 in the item number. Does the site only want to give me options for the same heat range my car accepts?
 

Shel_B

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If I removed plugs that looked like that, I would absolutely put in new ones.
Whatever happened to cleaning and gapping plugs? Many shops had a machine in which a plug would be inserted and cleaned with some abrasive material. When I was a kid, my uncle would bring his car to our place to do tune-ups., etc. I'd take his old plugs and clean them with sandpaper and emery cloth and then regap them for him.
 

carg618

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Whatever happened to cleaning and gapping plugs? Many shops had a machine in which a plug would be inserted and cleaned with some abrasive material. When I was a kid, my uncle would bring his car to our place to do tune-ups., etc. I'd take his old plugs and clean them with sandpaper and emery cloth and then regap them for him.
I think that fine tip plugs such as platnum and iridium are more delicate so it’s easier and safer to just get new ones
 
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Whatever happened to cleaning and gapping plugs? Many shops had a machine in which a plug would be inserted and cleaned with some abrasive material. When I was a kid, my uncle would bring his car to our place to do tune-ups., etc. I'd take his old plugs and clean them with sandpaper and emery cloth and then regap them for him.
Good idea. Have two sets of plugs, every once in a while swap them out, clean the other set when you have time, repeat as needed.
 
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Have you tried a piston soak with Berrymans B12, in an attempt at freeing the oil ring and drain holes? Sometimes this can reduce oil consumption. Especially if followed by a more viscous full synthetic oil that cleans.

What oil are you using?

I'd replace the plugs with the same ones. Fine wire plugs are more likely to fire when contaminated. Might even consider a heat range hotter.
 

carg618

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Have you tried a piston soak with Berrymans B12, in an attempt at freeing the oil ring and drain holes? Sometimes this can reduce oil consumption. Especially if followed by a more viscous full synthetic oil that cleans.

What oil are you using?

I'd replace the plugs with the same ones. Fine wire plugs are more likely to fire when contaminated. Might even consider a heat range hotter.
I might end up getting ngk copper v power plugs and just cleaning them every so often so they don’t get contaminated. I don’t like to clean fine wire plugs because you can damage them easily
 

carg618

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An ngk FR4GP would be hotter.

14mm .750 reach, 1.25 thread pitch 5/8 hex, seat type =gasket
I’ve done some reading and the ngk copper v power plugs run 1/2 point hotter than the standard ngk copper. This way if I get copper I can clean them and soak them more so they don’t get contaminated
 
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Astro14

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Whatever happened to cleaning and gapping plugs? Many shops had a machine in which a plug would be inserted and cleaned with some abrasive material. When I was a kid, my uncle would bring his car to our place to do tune-ups., etc. I'd take his old plugs and clean them with sandpaper and emery cloth and then regap them for him.
Labor costs.

New plugs are cheaper than the mechanic’s time.
 
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Re: Heat Range - Just be aware it is different between plug manufacturers as to whether the higher number is hotter or colder. It is more or less the case that "Domestic" (a misnomer now as all plugs are made offshore) plugs eg. AC Delco, Autolite, Champion etc. - the higher numbers are hotter. "Import" plugs eg. NGK - the lower the number the hotter the plug is. It is an unfortunate confusion that has been present for forever now. Double check with the specific plug manufacturer always.
 
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Whatever happened to cleaning and gapping plugs? Many shops had a machine in which a plug would be inserted and cleaned with some abrasive material. When I was a kid, my uncle would bring his car to our place to do tune-ups., etc. I'd take his old plugs and clean them with sandpaper and emery cloth and then regap them for him.
You could with nickel center plugs. But precious metal plugs are brittle and thin. You have to careful even gapping them. Many plugs are pre-gapped, you don't touch them. Easy to scratch or break damage the fine brittle electrode on an expensive plug. I check the gap on mine, but i use a feeler gauge and start out small, i don't let it drag. Round, coin type gappers are a no no.

And like Astro said, its not worth it from a mechanics point of view. With the difficulty of some cars, to change them, new ones make sense.

I only clean and regap OPE spark plugs , and on my generator, i'm running iridium as its less maintenance and starts easier.
 
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They are ash fouled from oil consumption. If you use a lot of oil, I would clean them up with a brush to remove the ash and reinstall back into your oil burner. Otherwise I would replace them if you can get a year out of them.
 
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