Another wheel torque question......Charger

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Jul 13, 2005
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Ok guys, sorry for another wheels question but here goes. First off thanks to Squirree for providing the torque info... Ok so I got my steel wheels/snow tire combo installed and set the torque for 140 lbs as that is what I could find for guidance. I received the following info about torque "In 2011, the Police Supplement lists 133 ft/lbs. By 2012, 110 ft/lbs was the only listing in the Police Supplement, and this is still the requirement for 2014 according to the most recent Police Supplement Manual. So, the current torque ratings for 2014 models are 110 ft/lbs for the police wheels and 130 ft/lbs for all others." Ok so I went out this morning and retourqed down to 110 on each wheel. I ran them at 140 pounds for about 1100 miles prior to bumping down to 110. A couple of questions popped into my head.......why the difference in torque values between wheels if the value is based on the stud and not the wheel? If I did over torque did I do any damage as in the lugs won't hold at 110 pounds now? My guess is no if it calls for 130 pounds for non steel wheels? Lastly these ratings come from a police supplement....is is possible the studs on a police model are different than a civilian Charger? Trying to learn as I go
 
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I've always torqued steel wheels to 100 ft/lbs and alloys to 80 ft/lbs. Unless the studs are rated for higher, I've snapped run of the mill studs torqued higher than 100 ft/lbs. What does it say in the owners manual?
 
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Originally Posted By: sciphi
I've always torqued steel wheels to 100 ft/lbs and alloys to 80 ft/lbs. Unless the studs are rated for higher, I've snapped run of the mill studs torqued higher than 100 ft/lbs. What does it say in the owners manual?
Toyota likes 78 for everything.
 
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Originally Posted By: Blue_Goose
...why the difference in torque values between wheels if the value is based on the stud and not the wheel?
My experience has been that the recommended torque is based on the wheel, NOT the stud. Same vehicle will have different torque spec for steel wheels and alloy wheels - same vehicle = same studs, of course. In all I have experience with, the torque spec for alloy wheels was always lower than the spec for steel wheels on the same vehicle. HTH
 
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Originally Posted By: HerrStig
Toyota likes 78 for everything.
Except where they spec 97 for the alloy wheels on my Land Cruiser ... spank
 
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Blue_Goose

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The owners manual says 130 lbs with no distinction between steel or alloy. The Police Supplement state's 110 pounds. I'm not sure why 2013 models spec 110 for alloys and 130 this year? Equally confused on why steel spec is less than alloy but in 2011 it was 140 for steel....now can you see why I'm confused? Lol
 
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I use a torque wrench on my wheel lugs but that's because I'm obsessive. Many people (most people) tighten them until they feel about right. Strong people tighten them really tight. And weak people don't tighten them very much at all - except for Mrs Ecotourist who is concerned that because she's not very strong she has to really go at it - and regularly breaks stuff. And guys with power tools really go at it, and you won't be able to get the lug nuts off with hand tools, and so on. So if you use a torque wrench and you're anywhere close to the right value - you're good.
 
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First, the point of the lugnut (or lugbolt) torque is clamping strength - holding the wheel securely to the hub. Just like head bolts, where you want the head to be secure to the block (so it STAYS sealed!), if the wheel gets loose, bad things happen. So it isn't so much the wheel or the stud (bolt) that determines the torque needed, as much as it is the need to make sure it doesn't come loose. And over-torquing? Not a big deal until you reach twice to 3 times the value specified.
 
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