Another reason to DIY tire rotation.

Messages
10,008
Location
Upstate NY
Here are some reasons that spring to mind to do your own tire rotation every XXXX miles: 1. See how your tires are wearing, and any issues they might have. 2. Check the pressure in your tires, and correct if necessary. This includes the spare if used in the rotation pattern. 3. Check the condition of your disc brakes. 4. Check the suspension for leaks, torn boots, etc. 5. Inspect for wheel-well rust (for the northerners). 6. It's a good opportunity to clean your dusty alloys. 7. Also to throw some anti-seize on the threads. 8. They get torqued correctly, so you can remove them in an emergency. 9. It's often faster than taking it somewhere. 10. No upselling things you don't need! Just did this in 40 minutes using a floor jack, the spare tire, and hand tools. Would go faster with an impact gun to get the lug nuts off. And it beats waiting for 2 hours at a tire place.
 
Messages
3,653
Location
Clermont, Florida
+1. I agree 110%. I have an electric 1/2" impact wrench from Harbor Freight, a flip socket set, a good 3 ton floor jack and 2 pairs of 3 ton jack stands. I can rotate my tires in half an hour. It is faster than taking it somewhere, and less inconvenient. Plus I get to inspect everything same as you pointed out. I rotate my tires at every oil change. But I did get crucified on here a few months ago when I mentioned that I put anti-sieze on the wheel stud threads....
 
Messages
4,830
Location
Kansas
I've owned 4 Aerostars so far in my life and whenever I need new tires, I take in 4 extra rims that I got, have them mount the tires and I take them home and install them myself. I do this because on the two previous Aerostar vans, the idiots drive the vehicle in and put the rack pads under the seam where the floor and the panels meet and are welded together. This seam does not have enough strength to hold the weight of the vehicle and it buckles. When this happens, the water drain holes are closed and the van will start to rust in that area. If I had a tire machine and a balancer, I'd do it all myself.
 
Messages
14,714
Location
Santa Barbara, CA
i would add that checking the spare tire pressure should be done regardless if its in the rotation or not. its amazing how many spare tires are flat inside a trunk.
 
Messages
39,775
Location
Great Lakes
 Originally Posted By: sciphi
7. Also to throw some anti-seize on the threads.
That one's questionable. I used to do it myself, but there is a school of thought that advises against it. For example, here's TireRack's stance...
 Quote:
Unless specifically stated otherwise, wheel lug torque specifications are for clean and dry threads (no lubricant) that are free of dirt, grit, etc. Applying oil, grease or anti-seize lubricants to the threads will result in inaccurate torque values that over tighten the wheels.
http://www.tirerack.com/wheels/tech/techpage.jsp?techid=107
 
Messages
1,877
Location
Pacnw
 Originally Posted By: Quattro Pete
 Originally Posted By: sciphi
7. Also to throw some anti-seize on the threads.
That one's questionable.
I agree with Quattro. All the points you mention are good and reminds me I need to rotate my tires, Thanks! But unless you are using aftermarket lug nuts of some different metallurgy than OEM, I don't use anti-seize.
 
Messages
2,373
Location
Pennsylvania
I had a mechanic (very good one) who always put a drop of ATF on every bolt before installing and tightening the lug nuts. Kept them from rusting and I never had an issue with rotor warpage or any other issue.
 
Messages
14,431
Location
The Old North State
Look, I'm sure a DIY rotation is nice if it gives you peace of mind, and you have the tools. That said, I have purchased many sets of tires from Discount Tire and with the exception of anti-seize, I can do or see done all of those things on the list. I take my flashlight and check the brake pads, and DT has no problem with me doing so. Add to the list that I can get my tires balanced as a part of the purchase, and I couldn't be more satisfied. They torque each lug to specs and check the pressures. IMO, they are very professional. I would say that Discount Tire is the Bitoger's tire store because they are particular in their work. Quite honestly, it's the best tire store I've dealt with in my many years of buying tires. Usually done in <30 mins. They even rotate my OE tires on my Honda Accord, free of charge. I think they know they are going to get my business, when it comes time for me to replace them. And, with the price match, they are tough to beat, IMO.
 
Messages
8,840
Location
Illinois
These are a lot of the same reasons why I change the oil in my niece's 2000 Grand Am (2.4 liter 4 cylinder) for free. She's a good kid, and there's no need for her to spend $40 at Wal-Mart to get it done, when I can take care of it for $18. Why? I know when it gets done, I know it gets done right, I can monitor the consumption of the oil...... and I get some good time with the car... to check the things that the original poster mentioned. I can check the tire wear, the belt, all of the fluids......
 
Messages
712
Location
St. Louis, Missouri
 Originally Posted By: Eddie
+1 don't lub wheel studs unless stated. I do however, use never-seize where the wheel contacks the rotor or drum.
Not sure, but I think this is referred to as the "hub," where you're placing the anti-seize onto. In other words, where the wheel mates to the hub. A couple weeks ago, I bought an 8 ounce jar of silver-colored (or aluminum-colored) anti-seize at O'Reilly for $6. The same 8 ounce jar at NAPA was $11. This was the silver-colored stuff--not the anti-seize with copper in it. Both forms, however, seem to be priced equally, even though the copper is good for hotter temperatures. You probably know all this stuff, but it helps refresh my memory :-)
 
Messages
2,431
Location
Toronto, Canada
One extra step I take during tire rotation is I crack open the bleeder screws and tighten them back immediately. This way I will never have a seized bleeder screw. I also mark the sidewalls of the tires I take off with the locations FL,FR,RL and RR.
 
Messages
14,431
Location
The Old North State
 Quote:
I also mark the sidewalls of the tires I take off with the locations FL,FR,RL and RR.
Another thing that is SOP (on tread) @ DT so there's no confusion over where the tires go. Watched them do it. Oh, and there's no charge for the life the tires with purchase.
 
Messages
4,009
Location
Calgary Canada
 Originally Posted By: hate2work
8. They get torqued correctly, so you can remove them in an emergency. More importantly, torque them correctly so that the front rotors don't get warped.
Torque them correctly, but if you don't have a torque wrench, tighten them with the wrench that comes in your car's tool kit. This way you'll be able to take them off with the same wrench. I see guys blasting their lug nuts on in their garage with an impact driver and wonder how they're going to get those off by the side of the road with the 18" lug wrench supplied in their car kit.
 

sciphi

Thread starter
Messages
10,008
Location
Upstate NY
Excellent point! I make use of that myself. It's possible to "just" tighten the nuts with an impact gun, but that's dependent on how fast your trigger finger can release the trigger.
 
Messages
39,775
Location
Great Lakes
Aren't there impact drivers out there that you can preset to a desired torque? Or does that not work? I know you're not supposed to use your torque wrench for ordinary wrench duties...
 
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