Amsoil Powerfoam

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140
Location
Bay Area, CA
Hello: Has anyone tried Amsoil Powerfoam? Did you notice any improvement? The directions says you have to remove your air filter assembly and spray into the intake. Does this mean remove the air filter or the entire air filter assembly? Any help would be great. Thanks! -ttvr4
 
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18,449
Location
East of IGO
Power foam will make a difference if there is a problem with excessive crud in the intake. Remember all the crud you remove goes through the engine. What does the crud do to the cyls and rings and valves?
 

ttvr4

Thread starter
Messages
140
Location
Bay Area, CA
Cool. I am going to try it out. So, do I need to remove the entire air filter assembly and spray it into the throttle body? Or, can I just remove the air filter and spray it into the intake? -ttvr4
 
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4,622
Location
Western Washington
 Originally Posted By: ttvr4
Cool. I am going to try it out. So, do I need to remove the entire air filter assembly and spray it into the throttle body? Or, can I just remove the air filter and spray it into the intake? -ttvr4
Well, you want to get the PF where it needs to be in order to work. That place, of course, is the combustion chamber. You'll get closer to it if you're able to remove the entire assembly. Some people introduce it to their engine through the vacuum line off the power steering unit, but I don't think that's as effective as going through the intake. You'll want to empty the can fast and then shut the car off so it can soak into the carbon on the tops of your pistons. And be sure to change your oil right after using this stuff :)
 

ttvr4

Thread starter
Messages
140
Location
Bay Area, CA
 Originally Posted By: hate2work
 Originally Posted By: ttvr4
Cool. I am going to try it out. So, do I need to remove the entire air filter assembly and spray it into the throttle body? Or, can I just remove the air filter and spray it into the intake? -ttvr4
Well, you want to get the PF where it needs to be in order to work. That place, of course, is the combustion chamber. You'll get closer to it if you're able to remove the entire assembly. Some people introduce it to their engine through the vacuum line off the power steering unit, but I don't think that's as effective as going through the intake. You'll want to empty the can fast and then shut the car off so it can soak into the carbon on the tops of your pistons. And be sure to change your oil right after using this stuff :)
Since the direction says to spray while the car is idling, the throttle body will be closed. Do I need to open up the throttle body and spray it into the chamber? -ttvr4
 
Messages
4,942
Location
Billings, MT
I personally do it with the car turned off, spraying the foam past the throttle butterfly until the intake is full, then bumping the engine over to suck the foam into the cylinders. I let it rest 10-15 minutes, then I take it out and run it a few miles. Repeat until the can is gone. Just be sure you shake the can once in a while. I had a can that stopped foaming after a while because the contents had separated and the foaming additive got sprayed out.
 
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2,098
Location
The Rocky Mountains
I still don't get everyone's recommendation to immediately change the oil. We have powerfoamed a TON of vehicles and have performed UOA's that show absolutely no deleterious effects. VOC's and butyl cellosolve won't last long in a combustion engine. Furthermore Amsoil doesn't recommend changing the oil either so I look at the oil change reco as based on paranoia versus any true science. By the way the powerfoam is a rocking product and does take out carbon varnish and sludge quickly. We regularly clean EGR's, IAC's, PCV lines that consumed quarts of oil and of course intakes. Every time a head is removed from an engine powerfoam is sprayed on the pistons and in 20 minutes the tech will wipe them with a rag to expose bear metal. Just don't spray it on your MAF sensor! Well worth the couple of bucks/can IMHO.
 
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Messages
1,034
Location
GA, USA
 Originally Posted By: pickled
I still don't get everyone's recommendation to immediately change the oil. We have powerfoamed a TON of vehicles and have performed UOA's that show absolutely no deleterious effects. VOC's and butyl cellosolve won't last long in a combustion engine. Furthermore Amsoil doesn't recommend changing the oil either so I look at the oil change reco as based on paranoia versus any true science. By the way the powerfoam is a rocking product and does take out carbon varnish and sludge quickly. We regularly clean EGR's, IAC's, PCV lines that consumed quarts of oil and of course intakes. Every time a head is removed from an engine powerfoam is sprayed on the pistons and in 20 minutes the tech will wipe them with a rag to expose bear metal. Just don't spray it on your MAF sensor! Well worth the couple of bucks/can IMHO.
+1
 
Messages
755
Location
Oshkosh, WI
Tried it once per the instructions on the can in an '01 Jeep Cherokee, and it fouled out two plugs. For engine de-carboning, I prefer GM Goodwrench Top Engine Cleaner (the liquid, not the spray).
 
Messages
39,806
Location
Pottstown, PA
 Originally Posted By: GT Mike
Tried it once per the instructions on the can in an '01 Jeep Cherokee, and it fouled out two plugs. For engine de-carboning, I prefer GM Goodwrench Top Engine Cleaner (the liquid, not the spray).
Do you recall the two plugs? If it was the back two, that was probably because the CCV vents on the back end of the intake. It's not centrally tapped.
 
Messages
755
Location
Oshkosh, WI
Actually, the CCV tube is close to the middle of the intake manifold on the newer 4.0L. The newer style intake has more rounded runners compared to the old style, and the CCV vacuum fitting is right behind the throttle body. I don't remember which plugs fouled, but I never had it happen with the GM Top Engine Cleaner, so that's what I've been sticking with. The stuff is getting harder to find though...My local GM dealer doesn't stock it anymore, so I have to make sure to keep some on hand.
 
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34,964
Location
NY
I have about 5 bottles of the GM TEC, good stuff. IIRC they reformulated it, I have the old formula. Have you tried the new formula is it any good? The TEC I have does one fine job cleaning carbon out of a rifle barrel.
 
Messages
39,806
Location
Pottstown, PA
 Quote:
Actually, the CCV tube is close to the middle of the intake manifold on the newer 4.0L. The newer style intake has more rounded runners compared to the old style, and the CCV vacuum fitting is right behind the throttle body.
I didn't realize that they changed it since 99. That was the 10hp gain intake that has more of plenum than previous years. The far right intake is a 99 here in this image. The CCV tube and brake booster hit the two ports towards the bottom of the manifold in the image. There's no reasonable way for the blow by gasses to have much of an impact on the front cylinders.
 
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1,841
Location
United We Stand
 Originally Posted By: pickled
I still don't get everyone's recommendation to immediately change the oil. We have powerfoamed a TON of vehicles and have performed UOA's that show absolutely no deleterious effects. VOC's and butyl cellosolve won't last long in a combustion engine. Furthermore Amsoil doesn't recommend changing the oil either so I look at the oil change reco as based on paranoia versus any true science.
I powerfoamed my car 1500-2000 miles ago. Wait until I post my non-scheduled UOA. I knew something was going on by the build up on the oil cap and the baffle. It would suggest not changing the oil immediately after powerfoam was a mistake.
 
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