2021 Volkswagen Jetta premature brake wear

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Why the need? Because you're doing a brake job and might have an air bubble causing an issue. A bleed at all brake services used to be common sense. I guess its not anymore. And, it rules out an air bubbles in any calipers as a possible cause of problem.

Originally, the 1st bleed for VW was 2 years. Since the free maintenance would've included it, VW updated the 1st bleed to 3 years, then every 2 years afterwards, so that they wouldn't have to pay for it during the free maintenance. Marketing is so great!

I've bled mine at year 2. All 4 bleeders had some air bubbles. I guess the country of location didn't do a good enough job.

You could have an air bubble up front that is leaning on the rear brakes. You could also have possibly a 2 foot driver(easy enough to verify) dragging the brakes.

So, clean, lube, bleed... and continue driving to see if its really a soft pad problem, air in the calipers, or a driving style issue. See what happens in the 'matter of months'.
 
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gregk24:

If you're just going to psd swap with new, beware that putting new pads on a used rotor may cause noises, chattering, or a loss of bite and effectiveness. Ceramic pad material versus semi metallic pad material does not always play well together. Over time pad material is embedded into the face of the rotor, and different pad compounds many not be compatible. Semi metallic for semi metallic, ceramic for ceramic. Only use ATE, Jurid, Pagid, or Textar. All are good. But it's not simply buying a brand, some brands will offer pad material options. Hopefully they will for the Jetta. Choose carefully.

I suggest putting coated Zimmerman rotors on. When we bought our brand new but two year old Passat, the tops of the rotor hats were rusted from just sitting parked for so long. The Passat had Textar pads from the factory, I forget the brand of rotor - but it was a known name. We drove the car 3,000 or 4,000 miles. I couldn't take the rusty rotor hats so I bought the coated Zimmermans. One thing about the factory brakes, the rotor surfaces seemed far more scored and discolored (black-ish) than I would have expected from just 3K or 4K mile old factory brakes.

When I put the Zimmermans on I used the original 4K miles old Textar pads. After a couple thousand miles I noticed the Zimmerman rotor had a much lighter colored metal face (light gray) that was virtually devoid of any scoring. And I used the same factory pads. My point is, I think Zimmermann makes high quality rotors. I've bought 4 or 5 sets and they always worked well.

And please, please, please don't let me accidentally insult you, but with you buying floor jacks and jack stands - is this one of your first repair jobs you've personally done? If you've never done a brake job I wouldn't start with your Jetta. If nothing else, you have that electric e-brake to deal with.

I suggest you search out a good independent and tell them exactly what you want, Zimmermann and whatever pad you choose.

As far as bleeding brakes go, I think brake fluid is one of the most neglected things in cars. As previous posters said, 2 or 3 years is the most common schedule, but I'd go the two year plan. What's the date of manufacture for the car? That's the starting point for brake fluid R&R..

You seem to treat and maintain your cars to a very high level. Do both rotors and pads, and pay a good shop to do it.

Scott
 
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When I put the Zimmermans on I used the original 4K miles old Textar pads. After a couple thousand miles I noticed the Zimmerman rotor had a much lighter colored metal face (light gray) that was virtually devoid of any scoring. And I used the same factory pads. My point is, I think Zimmermann makes high quality rotors. I've bought 4 or 5 sets and they always worked well.
Sounds like the original VAG rotors used damped iron, which is softer than your typical G3000 steel. Damped iron is often more expensive and allows for both improved NVH and improved friction (when paired with certain pad materials).
 
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Sounds like the original VAG rotors used damped iron, which is softer than your typical G3000 steel. Damped iron is often more expensive and allows for both improved NVH and improved friction (when paired with certain pad materials).
Interesting.

I can tell you this, the Zimmermann/Textar combination is completely noise free with only very slight wheel dust. If anything I think the Passat's brakes are on the touchy side.

Scott
 

gregk24

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gregk24:

If you're just going to psd swap with new, beware that putting new pads on a used rotor may cause noises, chattering, or a loss of bite and effectiveness. Ceramic pad material versus semi metallic pad material does not always play well together. Over time pad material is embedded into the face of the rotor, and different pad compounds many not be compatible. Semi metallic for semi metallic, ceramic for ceramic. Only use ATE, Jurid, Pagid, or Textar. All are good. But it's not simply buying a brand, some brands will offer pad material options. Hopefully they will for the Jetta. Choose carefully.

I suggest putting coated Zimmerman rotors on. When we bought our brand new but two year old Passat, the tops of the rotor hats were rusted from just sitting parked for so long. The Passat had Textar pads from the factory, I forget the brand of rotor - but it was a known name. We drove the car 3,000 or 4,000 miles. I couldn't take the rusty rotor hats so I bought the coated Zimmermans. One thing about the factory brakes, the rotor surfaces seemed far more scored and discolored (black-ish) than I would have expected from just 3K or 4K mile old factory brakes.

When I put the Zimmermans on I used the original 4K miles old Textar pads. After a couple thousand miles I noticed the Zimmerman rotor had a much lighter colored metal face (light gray) that was virtually devoid of any scoring. And I used the same factory pads. My point is, I think Zimmermann makes high quality rotors. I've bought 4 or 5 sets and they always worked well.

And please, please, please don't let me accidentally insult you, but with you buying floor jacks and jack stands - is this one of your first repair jobs you've personally done? If you've never done a brake job I wouldn't start with your Jetta. If nothing else, you have that electric e-brake to deal with.

I suggest you search out a good independent and tell them exactly what you want, Zimmermann and whatever pad you choose.

As far as bleeding brakes go, I think brake fluid is one of the most neglected things in cars. As previous posters said, 2 or 3 years is the most common schedule, but I'd go the two year plan. What's the date of manufacture for the car? That's the starting point for brake fluid R&R..

You seem to treat and maintain your cars to a very high level. Do both rotors and pads, and pay a good shop to do it.

Scott
No offense taken. First brake job? yes. It seems simple enough though. I just need to make sure I have the proper tools and watch a few videos to gain confidence. What challenges do you think one would face on a brake job?
 

TiGeo

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I have done the rears on my Golf several times which should be about the same as your Jetta (rotors are the same 272s but I have a manual parking brake). The only things that complicate the rotor swap are 1) needing a scan tool that has the ability to retract the e-parking brake if you have one which it sounds like you do and 2) triple square bolts holding on the carrier to the knuckle. There is little room in the back and working off the ground may not give you room for a breaker bar to remove those bolts - be warned. FCP Euro is a great source of parts here. Looks like they have quite a variety of pads but not much on the rotors - only the VW ones. Still, you are looking at <$200 all-in. I still think replacing rotors here is a bit overkill unless they are in bad shape and a brake bleed/flush at <2 years old is unnecessary...if it was my car I'd just do pads if they are worn enough to change them and go with something ceramic. I am on my third set of rear pads and only my second set of rotors for reference and I drive my car hard; 84K/4 years old. For the cost here may be easier to just have this done at a shop - any competent mechanic can do rears on a VW but using an indy Euro-focused shop is always a good way to go.


 
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No offense taken. First brake job? yes. It seems simple enough though. I just need to make sure I have the proper tools and watch a few videos to gain confidence. What challenges do you think one would face on a brake job?
1) One of your challenges might be retracting the e-brake.

2) Be careful you don't cock and jam the caliper pistons when you retract them into the caliper bodies. Use care around the piston seals as well.

3) If you replace rotors, the hub surface and centering flange must be spotlessly clean of all corrosion and dirt.

4) With a Miti Vac or something, suck out half the fluid out of the master cylinder reservoir so it doesn't overflow when you retract the caliper pistons (and top off with fresh fluid afterwards).

5) That said (#4), the proper way is to attach a hose, crack open the bleeder, and retract the caliper piston then. Doing it this way does not force "downstream" brake fluid into the upstream ABS unit or master cylinder. But doing this will likely require brake bleeding afterwards because no matter how hard you try not to introduce air into the calipers, it can happen.

6) Most VW triple square fasteners are one use only and should be replaced with new hardware when reassembling.

7) Tools, do you have all the proper tools, including triple-square stuff?

8) Jacking up the car is easy but finding a suitable area to place the jack stands is the hard part. This is one of my biggest challenges on all four of our cars.

greg, consider the source of the comments from those who say "just do it". There is an incredible amount of experience on this forum. I think it's easy for people to forget how much experience and knowledge they have. I'm sure TiGeo has done many brakes jobs (I've done dozens over the years on virtually every car I've owned - over 30 cars and 55 years worth!). But what's straightforward for TiGeo and me may not be so straightforward for you.

For all these reasons and through no shortcoming or fault on your part, I see this job turning into a **** for you. That, and as OCD and meticulous as you are, if the brake job presents problems and things play out in ways you don't like you might not be satisfied your work - even if everything works well. Over the years that's happened to me a few times and it's not a good feeling. Your OCD nature is such that you'll sell the car afterwards if you don't like how the job turned out - and I say that only half joking!

Scott

PS Never hang a brake caliper by its hose and be careful not to turn a caliper such that the hose is twisted when you remount it.

PSS Doing the fronts would be relatively easy in comparison because there is no e-brake to deal with. If you were doing the fronts I would be far more inclined to say "go for it".
 
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gregk24

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1) One of your challenges might be retracting the e-brake.

2) Be careful you don't cock and jam the caliper pistons when you retract them into the caliper bodies. Use care around the piston seals as well.

3) If you replace rotors, the hub surface and centering flange must be spotlessly clean of all corrosion and dirt.

4) With a Miti Vac or something, suck out half the fluid out of the master cylinder reservoir so it doesn't overflow when you retract the caliper pistons (and top off with fresh fluid afterwards).

5) That said (#4), the proper way is to attach a hose, crack open the bleeder, and retract the caliper piston then. Doing it this way does not force "downstream" brake fluid into the upstream ABS unit or master cylinder. But doing this will likely require brake bleeding afterwards because no matter how hard you try not to introduce air into the calipers, it can happen.

6) Most VW triple square fasteners are one use only and should be replaced with new hardware when reassembling.

7) Tools, do you have all the proper tools, including triple-square stuff?

8) Jacking up the car is easy but finding a suitable area to place the jack stands is the hard part. This is one of my biggest challenges on all four of our cars.

greg, consider the source of the comments from those who say "just do it". There is an incredible amount of experience on this forum. I think it's easy for people to forget how much experience and knowledge they have. I'm sure TiGeo has done many brakes jobs (I've done dozens over the years on virtually every car I've owned - over 30 cars and 55 years worth!). But what's straightforward for TiGeo and me may not be so straightforward for you.

For all these reasons and through no shortcoming or fault on your part, I see this job turning into a **** for you. That, and as OCD and meticulous as you are, if the brake job presents problems and things play out in ways you don't like you might not be satisfied your work - even if everything works well. Over the years that's happened to me a few times and it's not a good feeling. Your OCD nature is such that you'll sell the car afterwards if you don't like how the job turned out - and I say that only half joking!

Scott

PS Never hang a brake caliper by its hose and be careful not to turn a caliper such that the hose is twisted when you remount it.

PSS Doing the fronts would be relatively easy in comparison because there is no e-brake to deal with. If you were doing the fronts I would be far more inclined to say "go for it".
Thank you, I do appreciate the feedback! I plan on getting an OBDeleven or similar to retract the e-brake if I decide to attempt.
 
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Thank you, I do appreciate the feedback! I plan on getting an OBDeleven or similar to retract the e-brake if I decide to attempt.
You may want to invest in service information. Alldatadiy should have what you need.
 

gregk24

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You may want to invest in service information. Alldatadiy should have what you need.
Ok, I will have to look into that. Admittedly I was feeling more confident before reading some of these more recent comments lol. I like to learn new skills but certainly don't want to break anything. Paying the dealer may be what I end up doing I just don't want to get the garbage factory pads again. No one around here wants to use parts you bring in. We will see. More research needed.
 
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Ok, I will have to look into that. Admittedly I was feeling more confident before reading some of these more recent comments lol. I like to learn new skills but certainly don't want to break anything. Paying the dealer may be what I end up doing I just don't want to get the garbage factory pads again. No one around here wants to use parts you bring in. We will see. More research needed.
In general, you will find "general advice" on this forum, but not advice that is specific to a platform. So, if you want to learn how to do the job correctly, you will need to consult the repair instructions.

Also, there is nothing low quality about your rear pads. They just wear out faster due to their performance characteristics.
 
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Ok, I will have to look into that. Admittedly I was feeling more confident before reading some of these more recent comments lol. I like to learn new skills but certainly don't want to break anything. Paying the dealer may be what I end up doing I just don't want to get the garbage factory pads again. No one around here wants to use parts you bring in. We will see. More research needed.
All that stuff is normal practice, you won’t get there is you never try. Be prepared, pay attention to details, do one side at a time, so you have a good reference just in case you forget something. It’s much simpler than it looks.
 
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Alldata (at least the nonprofessional version) does not have it yet.

People have been known to buy 24 hour access and download the entire manual in an all nighter.

Im sure some judicious searching on the 'Tex would net you what you need too.

AND VCDS. I'm sure you could get help on the ross tech forum, but be warned ask only with a genuine Ross Tech interface or you will end up in the hall of shame...
 

gregk24

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For anyone interested, I spoke with VWOA again today and got confirmation that they are extending the warranty on brakes from 1 year / 12k miles to 2 years / 24k miles. So we will be covered and will receive new pads under warranty after all. I saw an internal document and presented it to them and they confirmed that letters will start going out to customers of affected vehicles sometime this month. Our VIN is included. I’m glad I didn’t have them replaced / replace myself! There is a new part out as well that corrects this issue (harder pad material).
 
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My '19 is at 38k miles and have 60+% of the pad material left. Just got new tires and was planning for a brake job, but the pads/rotors look phenomenal and should last to 80k miles if I continue my current driving routine. I am not gentle with brakes.

I wonder if they're playing a supplier game. When the time comes, I definitely won't be using OE pads or rotors.
 

gregk24

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My '19 is at 38k miles and have 60+% of the pad material left. Just got new tires and was planning for a brake job, but the pads/rotors look phenomenal and should last to 80k miles if I continue my current driving routine. I am not gentle with brakes.

I wonder if they're playing a supplier game. When the time comes, I definitely won't be using OE pads or rotors.
It is 100% not an issue on 2019 models. They started using a new pad material in 2020 at some point. Some some 2020 models, and all 2021-2022 models have this issue (except GLI - different brakes). We are easy on the brakes and the rears have dusted like MAD since new. I wash weekly and get a black stream of water that runs off the wheels for seconds from all the brake dust. Not an exaggeration.
 
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I was watching this one so I appreciate you updating. I have not noticed anything unusual on my 21 regarding brake wear but I will need to examine soon as I just rolled 23k.
 

gregk24

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I was watching this one so I appreciate you updating. I have not noticed anything unusual on my 21 regarding brake wear but I will need to examine soon as I just rolled 23k.
Certainly! If you do primarily highway miles then by nature you would get more life out of the pads, but I'd bet yours are lower than you think.
 
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I do a lot of commuting miles but just recently started getting a squeal backing out of the garage when it has sat overnight. Used to only do it when it had been in the rain before parking.

I went and tried to look just now and it is hard to see much with the wheels on but it doesn’t look like there is much there to me. Dealer just rotated the tires last week they could have said something. 🤨

So how do I get them to give me new brakes? You have the doc available? If I wait for them to contact me I’ll be past 24 k.
 
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