Will VERY frequent rotation reduce tread wear?

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Apr 24, 2018
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My old 2wd Diesel suburbans could be tough on front treads as can my heavy volt.


You can trade ride/fuel economy for tire longevity by

1. Upsize tire slightly (and go to a higher weight rating)

2. Change from standard tires to p-metric or LT tires with a heavier weight rating and the longest tire warranty you can find

3. Keep tires (especially the front) inflated to sidewall max.


In my case I just get the cheapest tire I can on clearance since I will always get through the tread before age out.

I was able to make the OEM tires on my Volt last 60,000 miles up front and 80,000 on the rear, I kept them at 50psi (sidewall rating) most of the time and only rotated once.

Considering most Volt owners are lucky to get 15,000 miles on an OEM tire I have to say keeping inflation pressure up usually greatly reduces front tire wear.

That said the set of Michelin’s after that I only ran a couple PSI over the door rating and I had
1. One tire split in the center of the tread (undulation)
2. Two tires wear excessively fast (I might get 35,000 to the wear bars despite more frequent rotations)


So at least in my case inflation seems to make a big difference.
 
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gathermewool

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When I buy lifetime balance & rotation at AT, it has been only $19/tire (at least when I bought the tires new from them). I agree that if you pay for a one-time rotation every time you rotate, it doesn't pay off. I looked at the current set on the new to me Camry in my sig, and decided not to pay AT for a one-time rotation; I wasn't sure it would extend the life of the tires beyond what I'll get without rotating.

I'm not convinced that my tires need rotating every 6-8K; I measured the tires on one of my vehicles at 10K and tread depth was even. But I know the front tires on the Sienna were shot after 20K of not rotating. But the biggest point for me is that if I don't rotate when AT says to (every 6-8K) I don't qualify for the prorate, so I do feel that the $76 for four tires does pay off, over the long haul.

So, you’re saying the tires wear evenly, front to back, left to right? If so, then just “record” a self-rotation and still take advantage of the pro-rate. Or does AT require you to go to a “professional” for your rotations or AT themselves at a cost to you.
 

paulri

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They record every rotation themselves (when I have skipped, it was noted); an optional purchase at the time you buy the tires is lifetime rotation. I never bothered to ask them if I could "record" a self rotation.

So, you’re saying the tires wear evenly, front to back, left to right? If so, then just “record” a self-rotation and still take advantage of the pro-rate. Or does AT require you to go to a “professional” for your rotations or AT themselves at a cost to you.
 

paulri

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The Sienna can actually take two sizes. I have always gone with the first:
215/65 R16

225/60 R17

Is the second one the upsize?

My old 2wd Diesel suburbans could be tough on front treads as can my heavy volt.


You can trade ride/fuel economy for tire longevity by

1. Upsize tire slightly (and go to a higher weight rating)

2. Change from standard tires to p-metric or LT tires with a heavier weight rating and the longest tire warranty you can find

3. Keep tires (especially the front) inflated to sidewall max.
 
Joined
Apr 24, 2018
Messages
2,780
Location
Wisconsin
215’s are too small for a 4000+lb minivan

I would install
225/65r16
P225/65r16
Or
225/60r16,

Even a 235 width if they fit your van might work.

Most important points are the weight ratings being better on the tire you select vrs the one it replaces

I would also check the tread wear rating.

Funny thing is that the bigger size might be cheaper, more common and have better weight ratings all around


In so far as Your rim size
It is rather expensive to change,
if you are going to those lengths
I would go to the antique 225/75r15 found on old pickups or the old English sized on a 15” rim pickup tires
Those tires should have much larger weight ratings and wear numbers than your lower profile treads, have better snow selections but would reduce your fuel economy
 
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