Volatility Measurements of 4 synthetics

JAG

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2.00 grams of each oil below were put in separate anodized aluminum cups on a "hot plate" with oil temps at ~340F degrees. Values below are the measured weight loss as a percentage of initial oil weight at 4 and 8 hours. Weights were measured with an Ohaus digital balance (Adventurer Pro AV412) that reads to 0.01 grams; accuracy of measurements below are +-0.5%. 1. Lubromoly 5W-40: At 4 & 8 hours: 7.0% & 12.0% 2. Lubromoly 0W-40: At 4 & 8 hours: 8.0% & 14.5% 3. Castrol Syntec 0W-30 ("Gold GC"): At 4 & 8 hours: 9.0% & 17.5% 4. Mobil 1 5W-30 (API SM version): At 4 & 8 hours: 14.0% & 25.5% The test procedure does not follow any standardized volatility test procedures of the oil industry because I don't have that capability. So don't compare these values to directly to any published NOACK volatility values; the values measured above should be compared relative to each other. But the trends between different oils done by the above test procedure should in most cases be similar to the trends of oils tested by the NOACK test procedure, although the numerical values themselves will certainly be different.
 

JAG

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Both Lubromoly oils are "Vollsynthese", meaning full synthetic in German and to them that means basestocks are Group 4 and/or 5 only; additive package carrier may be mineral oil though. I found an MSDS of Lubromoly 0W-40 saying it's 80% PAO and 20% mineral oil. I didn't find an MSDS for Lubromoly 5W-40. Gold GC hasn't been analyzed by Terry and others like Green GC has but bruce381 tested the solubility of both oils and found them to be the same which indicates (but doesn't prove) equal basestocks. Judging by Gold GC's low volatility, the tough specs it meets, and Bruce's results, I think it likely has PAO and some esters as does Green GC. If I can get a hold of some Green GC, I can measure its volatility and if it's equal to Gold GC, then it's even more likely they have equal basestocks. Mobil 1 Supersyn has a small % of Supersyn PAO basestock and the mystery is what makes up the majority of the basestocks. I can't definitively answer why M1 5W-30 is more volatile than these other oils; I can only make educated guesses that aren't worth posting.
 
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Anyone know where I can purchase some Lubro Moly VOLLSYNTHESE ENERGY MOTOR OIL 0W40 ? I am interested in checking it out. I am in the USA, Ohio.
 

JAG

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I got mine at Advanced Auto Parts and it seems they only recently started carrying it. Hopefully you have those stores in your area and they carry it or can order it for you. Otherwise, you'll have to find an online place that will likely cost more. I paid about $34 for 5 liter jug of the magic juice. Lubromoly 5W-40 was a few bucks cheaper than the 0W-40 in 5 liter jugs. I'm running the 0W-40 in my VW 1.8T engine and so far (about 700 miles) it's great. This stuff smells like a strong chemical compared to the "plasticy" smell of the 5W-40 - must be all that ZDDP!
 

JAG

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I've done many of these tests but this was the first in which I used a highly accurate way of measuring weight loss. In the past, I measured the residual volume which is okay (but not great)for discerning oils that are more than a little different. Using that method, I did test Amsoil 5W-40 (old version) and Redline 5W-30, though not together so can't compare them. I tested that Amsoil against M1 0W-40 and Valvoline Synpower 5W-40. The latter 2 were equal in many tests I did of them but the Amsoil was in a whole higher league than those 2 (just as these Lubromoly oils are). I'd have to go back to my notes to see what I tested the Redline against but I believe it was some grade of Mobil 1 and Valvoline Synpower and remember for certain that the Redline had much lower volatility than those I tested it against. I never tested Royal Purple. So I've finally settled on a great test procedure (after doing this over several years) that I will stick with and would like to test many other oils using this procedure. It's turned from a strange fascination about how different oils handle high heat to a great way of providing some really accurate volatility information. If I could only find some Green GC to test! I'd also like to test: Pentosin 5W-40, Motul 0W-40 & 5W-40, Delvac 1, and new Amsoil 5W-40.
 
Hey Jag - I'd be interested in giving you a quart of GC Green. I have 3 oil changes of GC Green + 1 quart. I am not interested in getting money out of it so if you want to pay for shipping I'll ship you one unopened quart of GC Green to you. Interested? Feel free to PM me. These tests are really awesome - says a lot about how good the oil really is. Although in my car, temperature guage shows 180-190F so oil can't get that hot in my car [Razz] (I assume)
 

JAG

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PM sent OriginHacker. Thanks! Oil temps inside an engine can get nasty hot for brief periods as it comes into contact with bottoms of pistons, piston rings, various bearings and other parts. As it passes on to other parts it cools back down and the sump temp is a relatively cool wading pool. Plus, I have a turbo and turbos can glow red hot which happens when steel is ~1200F...not that the oil in the bearings gets to 1200F because it doesn't just sit still there (unless engine is turned off) but it surely gets much hotter than sump temps.
 
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Thanks for sharing JAG. However I'm not to surprised the lowest viscosity, "ILSAC economy" oil had the most evaporation. Probably attributable to the AN and VII in the M1 5w30. If you get to repeat the test, try some M1 EP 10w30 and M1 T&SUV 5w40.
 

JAG

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Thanks for the info and comments 427. An update, The Green GC has arrived at my house courtesy of OriginHacker. Thanks man! Hopefully I'll have the results by the end of next week. I'll be busy at work the next two weeks so that's why there will be some delay. Green GC sure does smell different than Gold GC.
 
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Did you notice that the green seems a little thicker at room temperature than the gold, or was it just me? I was handling them in the clear cup to see what was up with these oils.
 

JAG

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I haven't taken it out of the bottle yet but before I test it, I'll tilt the cup of green and cup of gold at the same angle, then put them down flat quickly to see if I can detect a viscosity difference at room temperature.
 

JAG

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Last night the testing has begun of Gold and Green GC and new (NON-Belgian) version 5W-40 Syntec. I got some good data at 2 hours but right before 3 hours came some rain came and splattered some of the oils from each cup in uneven amounts! I will re-test them again but here is the data after 2 hours of heating. Note that above results in my first post were for 4 and 8 hours. Oils started with 2.00 grams. Gold GC lost 0.11 grams (5.5%) Green GC lost 0.12 grams (6.0%) Syntec 5W-40 lost 0.19 grams (9.5%) This is only data for 2 hours of heating so don't read too much into the slightly better # for Gold or Green. I must test them again and test at 2, 4, 6, 8 hours. Then we can start scrutinizing Gold vs Green! But the Syntec 5W-40 is clearly more volatile than both GC's, as it was when I tested it against Gold GC months ago. I couldn't detect a viscosity difference between Gold and Green at room temperature but my cup tilting method is quite pathetic. I doubt there is a difference anyway. Oddly, the Green started the test darker than Gold GC and was...well...green. By 1 hour of heating, it lost its Green color and became amber like some beers while the Gold GC and Syntec 5W-40 started very light gold and barely darkened. Once I retest the oils, I can make a better guess about whether it's the additive package differences causing this. Darkening in this case is not a bad thing; I'm just reporting an observable aspect of the test oils. Only when oils darken from lots of oxidation is it a bad thing. Redline darkened severely when I tested it years ago yet it had lower volatility than the synthetics it was tested with.
 
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