Tractor single reservoir power shift, hyd, hypoid. General requirements.

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3
Looking for general/tech info. Looking to go to single fluid for all farm tractors.

Many farm tractor use a single reservoir for hypoid/diff, hydraulics, and power shift (basically manual selected, automatic clutch plates for gears and pto). More or less 1980 and newer. Basically ATF, probably with hypoid additive. Case, John Deere, others, won't give a spec, only sell a (very expensive) product.

To buy only one fluid for multiple tracotrs, what is needed of the oil to basically fill the requirements of most single reservoir farm tractors? As a rule of thumb, what to buy? Dextron? Type F? Chrysler spec? Mercron? Farm store brand universal trans-hyd?

Rebuilding 3 Case tractor transmissions/pto this year for my brother in law, so something with the farm store no-name universal stuff isn't working.
 

JRed

Site Donor 2021
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2,311
Location
Virginia
I've never gone wrong by calling a dealer and asking what they use in your application, even if it's just to get a fluid spec so I can cross it to another cheaper fluid or order it from somewhere else. If you use the spec the dealer recommends and you're still chewing up transmissions/PTOs your problem is probably not a fluid problem.
 
Messages
82
Location
Georgia
They do give specs Case I know has the ms-12XX fluids John Deere has J20C. Valvoline, shell, Mobil all sell fluids that meet many of the specs not all but you need to know what is spec'ed for yours.

If your already using something that meets the right spec and still having issues then like JRed said you've got something else going on.

Definitely don't use the "yellow bucket 303" stuff. That spec is horribly outdated and I'm not sure why it's still sold.
 
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13,097
Location
Indiana
Any fluid from the big 3 will work across the board IMO. I know for a fact Kubota UDT carries approvals for all so I’m assuming it’d be the same for others.

Kubota
John Deere
Case New Holland.
 

Mr. J

Thread starter
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3
"Recommended for" and "meets specs" are two totally different things. I could sell a mix of mustard and ketchup and sell it
"Recommended For" all your engine and transmission oil needs.

I learned this the hard way with Amsoil. I put Amsoil ATF (recommended for) in my '93 Dodge Cummins automatic. Pulled a trailer to Alaska, ATF fluid burnt before I got there. And I baby my truck and keep my foot easy on the pedal, never shift under heavy throttle. Went back to true "meets spec" fluid, (Valvoline) never had another problem in 250,000 miles, heavily loaded over many mountain ranges.

So, "Recommended For" means it maybe will, or maybe won't, work well. I'm trying to get to a single tractor fluid to handle different tractors, but I have not found any "meets spec" fluids.
 
Messages
13,097
Location
Indiana
"Recommended for" and "meets specs" are two totally different things. I could sell a mix of mustard and ketchup and sell it
"Recommended For" all your engine and transmission oil needs.

I learned this the hard way with Amsoil. I put Amsoil ATF (recommended for) in my '93 Dodge Cummins automatic. Pulled a trailer to Alaska, ATF fluid burnt before I got there. And I baby my truck and keep my foot easy on the pedal, never shift under heavy throttle. Went back to true "meets spec" fluid, (Valvoline) never had another problem in 250,000 miles, heavily loaded over many mountain ranges.

So, "Recommended For" means it maybe will, or maybe won't, work well. I'm trying to get to a single tractor fluid to handle different tractors, but I have not found any "meets spec" fluids.
Amsoil ATF in a Chrysler is a bad idea IMO. Not the same thing as a clutch in an 80’s vintage tractor.

I’m fairly certain the “recommended for” verbiage is on the Kubota jug for Kubota tractors too. Kind of a CYA thing.

Anyways, you might just want to source the correct fluid “OE” for each machine if you’re going to be this picky. We went from wondering if ATF with some additive would work to a name brand hydraulic fluid (made by Ashland mind you) not being good enough. As mentioned, any fluid from the big 3 will be good enough. I figured you had at least one dealer local so sourcing wouldn’t be an issue. Be prepared to pay around $20 a gallon or so for whatever you go with. Name brand aftermarket like Mobil may be more.

If you have more than one make of something, be prepared to have the different fluids on hand. This is just the way it goes. You should see all of what I have for my vehicles alone.
 

Mr. J

Thread starter
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3
I'd really like to buy OEM oil. However, all tractors share implements (cylinders, hydraulic motors, etc.), so it all gets mixed up anyway. A known good single fluid would be the best answer.
 
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491
Location
SW Missouri
I use JD Hygard in all of our tractors except the 8N that uses 90wt. I have a mix of JD, Case, IH, Allis Chalmers, etc. Our White uses gear oil in the transmission but I still use Hygard in the hydraulic system.
 
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17,588
Location
Upper Midwest
I'd really like to buy OEM oil. However, all tractors share implements (cylinders, hydraulic motors, etc.), so it all gets mixed up anyway. A known good single fluid would be the best answer.
Wait, a single fluid for different designs and manufacturers is a good idea but you're opposed to "recommended for" on the label?

There's a disconnect here. I'm not sure if it was just to bring up your Amsoil "issue" but this whole thread is asking for two different objectives.
 
Messages
13,097
Location
Indiana
An easy alternative like I said is to run the factory recommended fluids in each machine.

If you’re worried about cross contamination from hydraulic implements, use only those on like branded machines filled with the same fluid. If you have a skid steer, I’d pick that. Grapple, hydraulic driven rotary cutter, post hole digger etc. The skid steer will be able to handle it all.
 
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