SYNTHETIC BLEND QUESTION, OR THOUGHTS, OR...

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I am not sure I have any logical thought process here, but, I was thinking about synthetic blend motor oils. I think for their two blends, Durablend and MaxLife blend, Valvoline advertises 70% GP II and 30% GP III. That kind of makes sense as GP II and GP III are closely related. But I am thinking it is still a blend, not a compound. The GP II still has its own "character" and GP III still has its own "character." If I assume or just make up a situation, I will say the GP II molecules will "wear out" at (X) miles/hours/use. The GP III molecules will "wear out" at (X+) miles/hours/use. In the SynBlend, would the GP III molecules carry an amount of the "load" that GP II molecules now do not have to carry so the total blend called synthetic blend lasts longer than just conventional? What about heat? The GP II molecules are going to react to heat the same way. How is the heat carrying range, the safe operating temperature of the blend increased? I am not speaking of VI here as surely the GP III would increase the VI. What about add packs? Are there differences in add packs between GP II only and GP II/III blends? Is it a "higher quality" add pack, or, just the same. Is it less than the add pack for a total GP III? I am thinking the same principles would apply to a GP II/GP IV blend. I can't help but think a blend is a much better deal dollar wise. With 5 quart jugs at Wal Mart, the difference between a conventional and a blend is on the order of just one dollar. The difference between a conventional and a "full synthetic" is on the order of 8 dollars. To me, just my practice, the synthetic would be well worth the 8 dollar difference. If the blend is really any better, it would not be wise to not pay just an extra 20 cents a quart for the blend. An example, Valvoline MaxLife blend is only $1.00 a jug more than their Premium conventional. I think that is a fantastic deal. Also,it could be that it is just very late at night and I am thinking, sort of, maybe .
 
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I would stick with Dino or go with Synthetic. If you want a blend, then buy some of each and blend it yourself for a 50/50 mix. 70/30 doesn't do much more than straight dino IMO. It is slightly better, but not worth the cost. Have a good sleep, it will be clear in the morning.
 
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I was thinking of mixing 50% M1 5w40 TDT with 50% Valvoline White bottle 5w30 when I run it next summer. Should turn out to be a nice thick 30wt viscous mix. ;\)
 
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 Originally Posted By: FrankN4
I am not sure I have any logical thought process here, but, I was thinking about synthetic blend motor oils. I think for their two blends, Durablend and MaxLife blend, Valvoline advertises 70% GP II and 30% GP III. That kind of makes sense as GP II and GP III are closely related. But I am thinking it is still a blend, not a compound. The GP II still has its own "character" and GP III still has its own "character." If I assume or just make up a situation, I will say the GP II molecules will "wear out" at (X) miles/hours/use. The GP III molecules will "wear out" at (X+) miles/hours/use. In the SynBlend, would the GP III molecules carry an amount of the "load" that GP II molecules now do not have to carry so the total blend called synthetic blend lasts longer than just conventional? What about heat? The GP II molecules are going to react to heat the same way. How is the heat carrying range, the safe operating temperature of the blend increased? I am not speaking of VI here as surely the GP III would increase the VI. What about add packs? Are there differences in add packs between GP II only and GP II/III blends? Is it a "higher quality" add pack, or, just the same. Is it less than the add pack for a total GP III? I am thinking the same principles would apply to a GP II/GP IV blend. I can't help but think a blend is a much better deal dollar wise. With 5 quart jugs at Wal Mart, the difference between a conventional and a blend is on the order of just one dollar. The difference between a conventional and a "full synthetic" is on the order of 8 dollars. To me, just my practice, the synthetic would be well worth the 8 dollar difference. If the blend is really any better, it would not be wise to not pay just an extra 20 cents a quart for the blend. An example, Valvoline MaxLife blend is only $1.00 a jug more than their Premium conventional. I think that is a fantastic deal. Also,it could be that it is just very late at night and I am thinking, sort of, maybe .
From what i have read here and other places is that the oil doesn't wear out, it's the add pack that wears out! You want a properly formulated oil. The add pack does most of the work. Mixing Vis w/ in the same brand is ok, but mix brands could be a problem w/ competing chemistry.I would have no problem mixing brands in a beater that i didn't care about, but not in a DD that i depend on!I don't change brands that often i find a brand w/ a good history of UOA's and stick w/ it.Most "full syn" now are Group3,PP,Q,Syntec,etc.Today you are splitting hairs, when it comes to SM oils, IMO you are paying for a better add pack!Buy the best oil that lets you sleep at night.
 
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I think as you progress thru grp II, II+ and III, you are simply getting a more consistent/uniform molecule - that being a very non-reactive hydrocarbon. And since there's less reactive molecules as you go thru II to III, then there's less stress on the add pack. Thus the add pack doesn't have to be better in III than II - in fact III can have less additives than II. II's weakness is that it has a broader range of molecular sizes (the smaller ones can evaporate), also it has some non-saturated base molecules (which are thus more reactive and can form things you don't want), and it can have more impurities than a III - just a touch of sulfates and nitrates floating around that can then react to form various acids (thus stressing your add pack). You can think of a III as just the best of what's in a II w/o all the "weaker" stuff. But otherwise, they aren't really that different. There is now III+ coming on line - and these may be engineered such that the above would not define them (??). The above is my understanding - I welcome further enlightenment.
 
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I was about to say in my post, what JMB said in his - "the oil doesn't wear out" - but in a way you could say the oil is "wearing out" for you if it's evaporating off it's smaller lube molecules, and if it has lube molecules that aren't saturated with hydrogens - these can react to form non-ideal lube molecules. But otherwise I think the statement is correct.
 
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