Submersible well pump

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Possibly looking for a new submersible well pump. 1/2 hp 120v. Wont build over 48 psi no matter how long it runs :/ . It is prob 25yrs old now .Well tank and pressure switch are all brand new as of Feb 2022 installed by well guy. Any good brands or ones to avoid? Thanks
 
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Mine is 240v, I thought most were.

I'm with you on the 240v. I do know there are submersible pumps out there that are 120v but I thought their application was limited to specific situations. Someone will have more info. Maybe OP can clarify?

OP, I have a 225ft deep well. The run from well to home is only about 75 feet. I had a 1HP Goulds that lasted 17 years, which is pretty sound. I had to have my well pump replaced last year. I went with a Pentair system and a 3/4HP pump. System holds 70-74psi when sleeping and provides solid water pressure even with 2 showers and a washing machine running. House is 3600sqft with me and 3 kids (10, 14, 16). Might be worth looking into before making a final decision. If you have that kind of time.

Pentair.jpg
 

dnewton3

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Franklin Electric is a very good brand, but there are many other good brands as well. I'm putting in a brand new well at my farm this week, using a 1/2hp Franklin. Gould is also a very good unit.

Even the average pumps available at home-supply stores are decent quality (not great, but decent). So if the pump is only going to be used a moderate amount of time, and not for uber long cycles, then the Joe Average pump at Home Depot or Menards would be adequate. If it's something that you need extreme performance from, you'll want to buy the best pump you can afford. IMO, this is not where you want to skimp on saving money, but we have to admit that there are folks who maybe don't have the luxury of buying top brands, and so there are reasonably priced alternatives at the home-supply stores which are surprisingly decent.

If you have the ability to upgrade to a 240v unit, do so. About the only reason I can think of which would prohibit you doing so is not having the space for the breakers in your electrical supply box. (240v uses both sides of the phase, so the tied-breaker must bridge two spaces). If you have the ability to do that, get a 240v 2-wire pump and avoid the separate control box also, if you have one. Doubling the voltage cuts the amp draw in half, which save you operational costs.
 
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Failing to build pressure can also be due to a leak in the pipe down the well or underground to the house. Does the pressure go away right away when the pump stops?
 
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Failing to build pressure can also be due to a leak in the pipe down the well or underground to the house. Does the pressure go away right away when the pump stops?


This is a good point. I have a friend who recently had pressure issues. In the end it turned out to be that the water line was leaking in the casing. Since the submersible pump was over 25 years old she had that replaced as well as long as they had it up.
 

CT Rob

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I'm with you on the 240v. I do know there are submersible pumps out there that are 120v but I thought their application was limited to specific situations. Someone will have more info. Maybe OP can clarify?

OP, I have a 225ft deep well. The run from well to home is only about 75 feet. I had a 1HP Goulds that lasted 17 years, which is pretty sound. I had to have my well pump replaced last year. I went with a Pentair system and a 3/4HP pump. System holds 70-74psi when sleeping and provides solid water pressure even with 2 showers and a washing machine running. House is 3600sqft with me and 3 kids (10, 14, 16). Might be worth looking into before making a final decision. If you have that kind of time.

View attachment 98976
My well is i think maybe 100 ft deep and its 25 feet or so from the house. 3bed room ranch 1 bath nothing fancy. 2 people. Current pump is at least 25yrs old so.In its early days it had plenty of use.Now its very light use.
 
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My well guy replaced my well pump after the well was fracked. I think he put in a Franklin Electric. His comment was Gould is an excellent pump but was overpriced.

A lot of the pumps at Home Depot or Lowe's may be 1/2 or 3/4 HP but they lack a lot of stages. Depending on well depth you may need many stages.

Who is going to pull the pump? Not an easy thing to do depending on the depth and the kind of pipe that was used. The absolute last thing you want to do is to start to pull the pump and drop it back into the well.
 
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Listen carefully out at the well when the pump is running. Listen for any hissing. There could be a leak right up top at the pitless adapter. Also look for any soft spots or water near the well or where the well line goes into the house.
If you need a 120V pump I do recomend a Goulds. In your case you should use a 1/2 hp 7 gallon per minute pump.
 
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CT Rob

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Listen carefully out at the well when the pump is running. Listen for any hissing. There could be a leak right up top at the pitless adapter. Also look for any soft spots or water near the well or where the well line goes into the house.
If you need a 120V pump I do recomend a Goulds. In your case you should use a 1/2 hp 7 gallon per minute pump.It's a 1/2hp 120 now so thats what will go back in if it needs replacing which im going guess is whats going to end up being the case.Ground from where well is to the house is totally dry no visible water.I may attempt to dig up the ground at the well just to see what if anything i find.
 
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I had a well pump in our basement in our first home in Kentucky. It had 2 lines to a foot valve and a 1/2 hp on top of the pressure tank. Our well was only 32 ft deep so that worked good for us. Pressure was regulated at 40lbs. Had plety of water for our family of 5-6 people. It was easy to repair when needed but only about 3 times in 20 years.
 

dnewton3

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I had a well pump in our basement in our first home in Kentucky. It had 2 lines to a foot valve and a 1/2 hp on top of the pressure tank. Our well was only 32 ft deep so that worked good for us. Pressure was regulated at 40lbs. Had plety of water for our family of 5-6 people. It was easy to repair when needed but only about 3 times in 20 years.
Sounds like that was a jet pump; not the same as a submersible unit. End result is the same; water pressure for use. But they operate differently. Jet pumps force water down a smaller line and then the foot valve turns the water around a 180deg turn and uses a venturi jet valve to draw water back up a larger line. They work well for shallow wells, not as good for deep wells and not nearly as common as submersible ones these days.
 
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they lack a lot of stages. Depending on well depth you may need many stages.
For a given hp, more pump stages increase pressure at the expense of flow.

The pressure at the pump is the pressure in the house plus the "head" pressure of the weight of all the water in the vertical pipe, which is about one psi per 2 feet. So for a deep well you need more stages so the pump can generate enough pressure to push water all the way up and still have an acceptable pressure at the faucets.

The number of stages should be matched to the well depth (and any rise in terrain between the well site and the house, which also counts as head pressure) by consulting the manufacturer's performance chart. Using a high stage pump in a shallower well is inefficient.
 
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