Stuck bleeder screw on calipers

Joined
Feb 19, 2009
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The Woods of NY
Hey what are my options here?
This is on the Kia.
I went to have the brake and clutch fluid flushed at dealer only to be told supposedly all four bleeder screws on the calipers are going to break and I need 4 new calipers. When I did the pads and rotors I even sprayed them with PB to make their life easier I thought 😂 . They definitely did not look new, but they weren’t completely shot either.

They did flush the clutch though no problem.


What should I be doing here worst-case scenario if they do snap? Is it seriously new caliper time? Would the easy out shine here?
I’m thinking I’ll get them all broken free or broken 😆 and then have the fluid flushed.
This is just maintenance, and I’m not trying to correct any brake issues so the flush is not a emergency but I would like to have it done.

Thanks! 🙏

Edit: I know I’ve been posting a ton of issues lately regarding these brakes. Hopefully that will stop soon 😂
 
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Joined
Jan 22, 2011
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7,894
If they snap, it's caliper time. Spraying them will do nothing. The penetrant will not go down the threads to do any good.. Myself, I would forget the flush job for now. There's probably nothing wrong with the fluid right now. If you have your sights set on it, a light tap or two with a hammer, "some" heat and use a six point socket (best) or a line wrench and hope for the best.
I think too many are obsessed with flushing brake fluid every few years. I do mine every other pad replacement.
 
Joined
Sep 26, 2017
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Under the Hood
What I would do is.

1) Order four new bleeder screws.
2) Use vise-grips (penetrating-oil, heat, tap with hammer) .... get them loose or break them.
3) Install 'new' bleeder screws (never-seize on threads) Edit: Use brake grease because of the heat
4) Coat with cosmoline, drop of oil in hole
5) Install protective cap
6) Every two years .... loosen, retighten, re-oil
 
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Joined
Dec 31, 2017
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12,523
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SE British Columbia, Canada
This is probably why people never get around to bleeding brakes. When I change out my winter tires I give the bleed screws a shot of rust inhibiter, but I still cringe when I undo a bleed screw. For the OP, I would shoot penetrating oil on them a week ahead and again a day ahead. I also purchased an extra long but skinny wrench to get leverage on the bleeders. Put on gloves and give it the mighty turn. Make sure it’s lefty loosey. Normal 8 mm and 10 mm wrenches are pretty useless for rusted bleeder screws. Here is that long wrench.

DE9588F3-E338-43B8-AA93-9A5A09580B41.jpg
 
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1 SX

Thread starter
Joined
Feb 19, 2009
Messages
1,360
Location
The Woods of NY
Let the calipers go until the next brake job .
I’m more worried about the ABS module given out and losing traction / stability control and ABS plus having a much more expensive repair on hand. So that’s why I want flush the brake fluid to get out any sort of moisture out of the ABS computer system. The pedal feels absolutely fantastic but it’s more so peace of mind so I know everything is up-to-date and the fluid in the braking system is clean without moisture or contaminants. All four caliper pistons I was able to push in with my hands so they are still good at the moment also.
 

D60

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Nov 6, 2017
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Colo
Mayhew and Lisle sell similar air hammer attachments. This is the first I've heard of one being marketed solely as a bleeder remover; I've seen Eric O use them for all manner of things.

Try searching Mayhew 37315

It's likely not worth the effort but if the bleeder breaks you can quite possibly drill it out with a LH bit. For best accuracy remove and get it clamped in a mill. You can blow any chips out with compressed air thru the banjo connection, then alternate and blow from bleeder to banjo, etc. I had to do this on a reman Cardone....shocking I know.

For the love of God don't use spiral fluted Difficult Outs
 
Joined
Dec 12, 2006
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NY, NY
I successfully removed the stuck bleeders on my Suburban with heat and penetrating oil. I put NevR Sieze on the new ones.

That tool posted above rocks.
 

D60

Joined
Nov 6, 2017
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1,590
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Colo
The wrench is not made with special sauce. The primary advantage of the bleeder wrench is the offset for drum backing plates. On calipers it's really of no benefit except being 6 pt, but you can just use a 6pt socket.
 
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
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6,067
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Iowa
If you're capable of doing it yourself, use a 6pt 1/4" drive socket/ratchet and pretension it with one hand and bump it with the meat of your other hand repeatedly until free. It helps if you have a feel for what will go and what will break. Patience is the key here. If that doesn't work, try some heat
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
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29,212
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Bleeder screws are on part that penetrating oils works well with, the threads are not sealed with a washer, bolt head or gasket, they are fully exposed. Not all penetrating oils are created equal, some are much better than others, the best way to use it is to leave it overnight if possible and spray it multiple times.

This is a old trick, find a drill bit end (not the cutting end) that fits snug in the bleeder hole, once you find one that fits well get some cheap junk bits from Amazon or HF and put it down the hole and break it off in the bleeder, the firms the bleeder up so it doesnt collapse in on itself.
First you can try putting on a wrench and tapping it lightly with hammer quite a few times, do not put a lot of torque on it, you want to shock it loose, this will usually get them. Once it moves spray some penetrant on it and tighten it slightly then loosen again.
If that doesnt get it the shake and break tool that have been posted works like a champ but you need a compressor and air hammer, a small hammer is best not a huge thing.

Personally I do not like taking heat to a caliper there is too many rubber components on and around that can be damaged. I have not broke a bleeder in many years and I deal with rotten stuff sometimes on antique Euro cars that calipers can no longer be found and must be rebuilt. So don't take them claiming the bleeders are going to break too seriously.
Replace the bleeders with new ones and put some nickel anti seize on the treads only and do not over tighten them, they only need to be snug to seal, you will never have this trouble again. I use stainless speed bleeders from this company if available or OE.

 
Joined
Feb 6, 2021
Messages
1,023
Location
Massachusetts
Hey what are my options here?
This is on the Kia.
I went to have the brake and clutch fluid flushed at dealer only to be told supposedly all four bleeder screws on the calipers are going to break and I need 4 new calipers. When I did the pads and rotors I even sprayed them with PB to make their life easier I thought 😂 . They definitely did not look new, but they weren’t completely shot either.

They did flush the clutch though no problem.


What should I be doing here worst-case scenario if they do snap? Is it seriously new caliper time? Would the easy out shine here?
I’m thinking I’ll get them all broken free or broken 😆 and then have the fluid flushed.
This is just maintenance, and I’m not trying to correct any brake issues so the flush is not a emergency but I would like to have it done.

Thanks! 🙏

Edit: I know I’ve been posting a ton of issues lately regarding these brakes. Hopefully that will stop soon 😂
Caliper time unfortunately.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
Messages
29,212
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
It is not going to mix with brake fluid, the bleeder screw is bottomed out and sealed, you are lucky if it gets down a couple of threads but those are usually the ones most corroded.
 
Joined
Nov 9, 2008
Messages
20,861
Location
NH
10 year calipers in the rust belt? I get it, good tools can meke ‘em come out, but I have to wonder if cost/time/effort does not indicate to just replace the calipers. It might not be cornerstore reman time with these miles, but have you priced out the options?
 
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