Seems like a no brainer to run 0-x rather then 5-x for cold temps?

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Read that SAE J300....

Winter rating....

You said weight in that other post.... And were patently wrong.

It reads.... 10w30...

10w for winter.... Cold rating tested per SAE J300...

30 operating viscosity.... At motors operating temperature....
So again. You’re saying oil thickens when heated?
That it rests at winter weight of 10 and then increases to a viscosity of 30 as you heat it to operating temperature?
I’m really trying to spell this out for you in the simplest way I can think of.
 
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This is not true. Again, i cannot stress this enough. Viscosity at temperature is about the quality of the oil you buy. While its true that a 0w20 COULD perform better its a deceiving way to looking at it. A 0 weight oil does not necessarily flow better at cold temps than a 5 or a 10 weight oil. Both oils have a 30 rating in Winter (plus or minus the differential of the base oil). The 0, 5, 10 viscosity represent the characteristics of the oil as the oil heats up.

Its a far better idea to provide youre engine with the lubrication requirements at operating temperature (where far more wear occurs over time) than it is to focus solely on starting. Here in Canada - if youre starting youre car in -30c. Plug the thing in.
Most of these statements are incorrect.

And I hear the sobbing and wailing of a Frost Troll caught in my trap

troll.jpg
 
Anyway, I’m running 0W30 in my 6.0 Chevy V-8. It gets a warm start in my heated garage every morning, but cold soaks for 9 hours outdoors every day and then gets a cold star in the late afternoon, usually using the remote starter. The coldest we get is usually -32 C for a few days. If someone can post a graph of the kinematic viscosity vs temperature for 0w30 and 5w30, that would help. Also, it helps for the armchair cold weather experts to actually sit in a car at -32 C and start a vehicle that has not been plugged in to get a feel for it.
 
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Ahh look at that SAE J300 chart....

Notice those numbers....


These on the left side....
0w
5w
10w
15w
20w
25w


Then the 20 on the right side
30
40
50

Farther down on the right side of that chart...

Thats the way the chart is set up....


And how you.... Read it.

10w... For winter SAE testing standards met...

Then 30 for operating viscosity... On the right side of that chart....

So say a 10w tested at say 5,400 CCS and 40,000 MRV... It passes the 10w part for cold weather performance.

Operating viscosity is within the 30 grade range on the right side of the chart....

This that oil meeting both cold and operating viscosity requirements.
 
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It all started here.

I see what you mean. This guy's an absolute squirrel. Claims to be a certified lubricant specialist working for a lubricant formulator, but doesn't understand the basics of SAE 300. But he is exceptional in one sense; he's alienated the population of BITOG in only 12 posts.
 

4WD

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So again. You’re saying oil thickens when heated?
That it rests at winter weight of 10 and then increases to a viscosity of 30 as you heat it to operating temperature?
I’m really trying to spell this out for you in the simplest way I can think of.
Maybe get really really simple …
 
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