Rust-oleum vs Ace Rust Stop

JHZR2

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I want to paint some metal with a rust preventive paint. I have Ace with their rust stop line, and Rust Oleum is everywhere. Which is better? I’m looking at both spray and paint in a can.

I built a play house some years back and made a fire pole and ladder out of galvanized conduit. I cleaned it with ospho and sprayed it with international harvester red Ace Rust Stop spray paint. It has held up and adhered well for years in the elements including direct afternoon sun.

But wondering what others’ experience is. My project is nothing critical, and easy to redo, but curious all the same to get the best product…

Thanks!
 
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I'm not a paint expert at all. Some years ago I investigated solvent based paint quality and consulted a paint engineer at a local small paint manufacturer that sold Coronado Paints (now part of Benjamin Moore) . Alkyd based solvent paint like Rustoleum is the first level in paint quality from my learning experience. It is mediocre in shine retention, hardness, chalking/wear. Outdoors you get maybe 3 to 6 years before it starts to degrade. At my workplace I thought maybe I was getting a very slightly better product by moving up to a polyurethane alkyd enamel: https://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us...stains/product-catalog/crs/coronado-rust-scat My opinion is that maybe it is a trace better than plain alkyd enamel..... the polyurethane content is tiny and it is mostly marketing. From this paint company I also tried a fast dry version with hardener: https://www.rustoleum.com/en/produc...-performance/alkyd-coatings/alkyd-accelerator It helped a bit, but maybe only added another year or two before paint degradation. Very dangerous to inhale, these isocyanate hardeners. they are more effective with paints designed as two component (alkyd is not).

You need to go to industrial products to improve on the quality of consumer alkyd enamel. Having said that, I've noticed that the Rustoleum Professional spray product seems to be a decent quality product. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Ol...egal-Red-Spray-Paint-6-Pack-7565838/204770329 .........It seems to have a decent solids content. It drys fast. Great spray pattern (I pre heat the cans). I haven't determined why, but it just seems a bit better than other consumer alkyd products. Still, it is just an alkyd enamel. It's my go to product for small ag equipment projects. No experience with the Ace product.

Probably should not over think this (like I did).
 
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I want to paint some metal with a rust preventive paint. I have Ace with their rust stop line, and Rust Oleum is everywhere. Which is better? I’m looking at both spray and paint in a can.

I built a play house some years back and made a fire pole and ladder out of galvanized conduit. I cleaned it with ospho and sprayed it with international harvester red Ace Rust Stop spray paint. It has held up and adhered well for years in the elements including direct afternoon sun.

But wondering what others’ experience is. My project is nothing critical, and easy to redo, but curious all the same to get the best product…

Thanks!
Use what you already have. It will work fine.
 
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As a rule of thumb industrial maintenance coatings are better than the paints you'll find in a local Ace or HD. Having said that of the two you mentioned I'd use the Rustoleum product. Do some proper prep work and use the primer you previously used first [yes, clean, scuff sand, clean again, and re-prime] allowing the recommended drying time, then finish with a few coats of the paint you have.
 
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If you have a Benjamin Moore retailer near you, get some Coronado Rust Scat. It is a professional favorite.
Helped my younger sister paint a metal cellar door and it has been holding up great.
 

JHZR2

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As a rule of thumb industrial maintenance coatings are better than the paints you'll find in a local Ace or HD. Having said that of the two you mentioned I'd use the Rustoleum product. Do some proper prep work and use the primer you previously used first [yes, clean, scuff sand, clean again, and re-prime] allowing the recommended drying time, then finish with a few coats of the paint you have.
All I used on the galvanized conduit was some solvent to degrease, then ospho to slightly etch.
 
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All I used on the galvanized conduit was some solvent to degrease, then ospho to slightly etch.
That's fine. I guess I misunderstood you and thought you were repainting it. Your prep work was fine. I might however opted for self etching primer for the galvanized metal.
 
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If you have a Benjamin Moore retailer near you, get some Coronado Rust Scat. It is a professional favorite.
Helped my younger sister paint a metal cellar door and it has been holding up great.
Benjamin Moore also took over Ace’s paint program from SW/Valspar - this also includes their specialty paint lines(Rust Stop and their wood stains). BM generally makes a good, if not pricey product but labor/time > materials. They now have a waterborne acrylic urethane called Command they’re pushing - it uses the same tint system as their regular paints.

Unless you’re using a 2K polyurethane like Imron or one of Rust-Oleum’s or even BM’s “industrial” lines, expect 1K solventborne alkyds(like Rust-Oleum and off the shelf oil-based enamels from the paint store or your favorite blue/orange box) to fade, like an old truck.

There was someone who mixed in a isocyanate hardener into Rust-Oleum and it hardened much faster. I forget which hardener and ratio was used.
 
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Benjamin Moore also took over Ace’s paint program from SW/Valspar - this also includes their specialty paint lines(Rust Stop and their wood stains). BM generally makes a good, if not pricey product but labor/time > materials. They now have a waterborne acrylic urethane called Command they’re pushing - it uses the same tint system as their regular paints.

Unless you’re using a 2K polyurethane like Imron or one of Rust-Oleum’s or even BM’s “industrial” lines, expect 1K solventborne alkyds(like Rust-Oleum and off the shelf oil-based enamels from the paint store or your favorite blue/orange box) to fade, like an old truck.

There was someone who mixed in a isocyanate hardener into Rust-Oleum and it hardened much faster. I forget which hardener and ratio was used.
You can buy those hardeners for alkyd paint at TSC and other farm stores. I was told they help alkyd paint "some", but not as much as when you use a true 2K system.
https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/majic-catalyst-hardener-clear-half-1-2-pint
 

JHZR2

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