Replacing Coolant Bleeder Screw Question

Messages
322
Location
TN
Tomorrow I plan to replace a coolant bleeder screw on a 2006 Saturn Relay 3 with the 3.5L. (Same vehicle as a Chevy Uplander) I will be using a GM# 10070107 as the replacement part. Can I just take the old one off and put the new one in or do I need to drain some coolant out so the area can be dry before I put the new one on? This is for the one on the passenger side of the engine not the one on the thermostat housing. Thanks
 
Messages
8,626
Location
Champlain/Hudson Valley
Hello, Without knowing your engine at all, let alone GM part # 10070107, I'd guess it all comes down to questions of environmental responsibility, thoroughness and mess. Pre wrapping the threads in teflon tape or swiping on some teflon paste is likely your first step. Draining your coolant down whilst reserving the option to change it, would be thorough. Unscrewing the old one and letting it drip on the ground would be environmentally irresponsible and messy. I do hope the old drain screw comes out cleanly. Kira
 
Messages
5,446
Location
Ohio
You can place a drain pan to collect and if you are fast enough, you can change it without draining it.As mentioned, wrap the threads with teflon tape, in the same direction as if you were tightening the valve.
 
Messages
807
Location
Oaxaca, Mexico
As long as the engine is cold and the radiator cap is closed you are going to loose very little fluid when you change the bleeder. Surface tension and lack of ventilation will keep the coolant from flowing out of the bleeder. I wouldn't use Teflon. The bleeder uses one of two possible mechanisms to seal, neither of which is helped with Teflon. It will either use a nonferrous washer or a tapered seat for sealing. Teflon will just make it easier to over tighten and damage the threads and/or sealing mechanism.
 

CT8

Messages
15,392
Location
Idaho
Originally Posted By: Cardenio327
As long as the engine is cold and the radiator cap is closed you are going to loose very little fluid when you change the bleeder. Surface tension and lack of ventilation will keep the coolant from flowing out of the bleeder. I wouldn't use Teflon. The bleeder uses one of two possible mechanisms to seal, neither of which is helped with Teflon. It will either use a nonferrous washer or a tapered seat for sealing. Teflon will just make it easier to over tighten and damage the threads and/or sealing mechanism.
THIS +1
 
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