Redline in a twin turbo Supra

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davefr

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Delo might be a good fleet diesel oil but I sure wouldn't use it in my Supra. At 15W40 it's too thick since Toyota recommends a 5W30 or 10W30 viscosity. I'd also be worried that dino oil and superchargers aren't the best combo. Everything I've read indicates you want a full synthetic for turbocharged engines due to bearing heat which can turn dino oil to tar should the turbo not be cooled down prior to shutting off the engine. I also like Moly and Delo has none.
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Originally posted by Steve S: I'll bet that delo oil would protect as well as any oil you can buy in general, remember big diesel engines have large diameter journels and the bering speeds would be as high as any car engine . Some big truck engines cost way more than a Supra .Not to step on anyones toes .I may be getting a 1967GTO from my friend and if I do it will be getting a 632 ci world products engine, what will I put in it Delo oil why ? for the protection. Chevron ran Delo in some race cars for a while .Worked good . Although You can't go wrong with Redline oil.
 
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How would Schaeffer oil, #703 Supreme 7000 10W-30, fair in comparison to Redline in the Supra Turbo engine? TIA, Brian [ April 07, 2003, 11:30 PM: Message edited by: BrianJ ]
 
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There is no doubt that redline is great oil but supras turbos come from the factory with dino oil and are the turbos water cooled?. I have used delo in my boat which has spent more time at 6,500 to 7,000 rpm with a 7,500 rev limited reached when the prop gets air I have an engine in my shop now apart due to a block problem the pistons and berings are like new using delo. moly ? Amsoil is with out it and has nice wear numbers.I,m not knocking synthetic oil as I have and do use them but heavy duty fleet oils are the best oils for the money and as good as more expensive oils.http://members.aol.com/fmtrvt/OilStudy/current.pfd [ April 08, 2003, 02:23 AM: Message edited by: Steve S ]
 

Patman

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quote:
Originally posted by Bror Jace: Water cooled turbos? Can someone verify that? I've never heard of such a thing. [Confused]
All the Chrysler 2.2 and 2.5 turbos were water cooled. I remember them making a big deal out of this in the ads. I had a 1988 Dodge Shadow Turbo that I bought brand new in 1988. I was super anal with that car, I changed the oil every 3000km (1800 miles) with Castrol XLR 10w30 and made sure I idled it for one minute before shutdown to keep the turbo from dying an early death. I sold the car to my sister and the turbo died around 120k.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Chris B.:
quote:
Originally posted by Justin: Pickups that pull sleds. (Ex. - Dodge Ram 5.9L Cummins making well over 1000ft-lb torque!!!)

Sience when does Dodges 5.9 liter make 1,000lbs of tq? Standered it has around 520lbs how do you double that? [/QB]
Pickups that pull sleds. He's talking about modified trucks. Things can be modified you know. [Razz]
 

davefr

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Bror, What do these Esters do after a year?
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Originally posted by Bror Jace: Water cooled turbos? Can someone verify that? I've never heard of such a thing. [Confused] Also, supercharging does NOT put the same stresses on an oil that turbocharging does. Supercharging is running a compressor off the crankshaft pulley. Turbocharging is running a compressor off the EXHAUST ... so expect MUCH hotter temps as the oil is pumped through it. davefr, with so few miles on the car each year, you might be better off with a less expensive dino oil (maybe a 15W40 like Delo400) and changing it every 2,000 miles. I don't like the idea of one batch of oil (especially with a lot of esters) sitting in the crankcase for a year and a half. [SPAZ!] ---Bror Jace
 
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My 89 Mazda 626 GT has a watercooled turbo. Even though poorly maintained before I got it the original turbo is going fine at 200,000kms. Don't believe that would be the case if aircooled IMO.
 
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Has there really been an evidence that bc Mobil is on the thin side, it won't protect as well as RL or Amsoil in high performance engines? We know the Ht/Hs will be lower, but what about the flow factor? [Big Grin] More oil getting to places quicker and faster. I'm stealing Bob's idea, hope he doesn't mind. [Smile] I just don't know if these specs. really make that much of a difference. I used to think they did, but until analyis can prove it, I don't put much weight into specs.... [I dont know]
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Bror Jace: Water cooled turbos? Can someone verify that? I've never heard of such a thing. [Confused]
I have one sitting in my living room, and another in my car. Coolant line runs parallel to the oil line and enters the center housing, circulates around the bearing to cool it. Very common actually. Every VW/Audi turbo car uses a water cooled unit.
 
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Water cooled turbos? Can someone verify that? I've never heard of such a thing. [Confused] Also, supercharging does NOT put the same stresses on an oil that turbocharging does. Supercharging is running a compressor off the crankshaft pulley. Turbocharging is running a compressor off the EXHAUST ... so expect MUCH hotter temps as the oil is pumped through it. davefr, with so few miles on the car each year, you might be better off with a less expensive dino oil (maybe a 15W40 like Delo400) and changing it every 2,000 miles. I don't like the idea of one batch of oil (especially with a lot of esters) sitting in the crankcase for a year and a half. [SPAZ!] ---Bror Jace
 
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Non-cooled turbochargers are more efficient, but turbochargers with a coolant circuit don't overheat the oil as readily...good for longer turbo bearing life. As you said, a turbocharger is a gas turbine driving a centrifugal air compressor...the turbine side running in the hot exhaust gas gets it's bearings hot and can cook the oil. Ken
 
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davefr, esters are hygroscopic … they absorb moisture. I don’t think this is an issue as long as you stick to moderately extended drain intervals but even Red Line does not recommend time intervals of over a year, regardless of mileage. [I dont know] OK, OK, I see that there ARE such things as water-cooled turbos. [Wink] I didn’t mean to imply that I thought the idea impossible, I just had never seen one and haven’t been reading my issues of Road & Track religiously as I used to. [Frown] The plumbing sounds a touch complicated (i.e. prone to clogging?). Oh, and it must be a terrible burden to the cooling system in general. [Eek!] I take it they require extra capacity and/or a larger radiator? Patman, sorry to hear about that Shadow. Is your sister over it … or did she think you intentionally sold her a ticking time bomb. Personally, I had no faith in Chrysler products from that era … and that prejudice of mine holds true until this day. You cared so thoroughly for a creature which simply didn’t wish to live. [Frown] --- Bror Jace
 
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This has been a most interesting discussion here .A long time ago I watched a ww2 movie where the German army interrogated the pows each pow had contributed an amount of information which led to the german army to figure out that there would be high altitude precision bombing runs .I guess you have to see the movie. But to me I pick up imformation .
 

Patman

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Bror, my sister actually had pretty good luck with that car. She drove it from 1991 until early 1996 and the head gasket failed and she had to replace the rad, but other than that the car served her very well. When the turbo died, she traded the car in for a new 95 Escort GT (which I then bought from her two years later and drove for two more years until I bought the 2000 Civic) When I sold the Shadow to her I still changed the oil for her, but not as regularily, and by then I switched it over to Mobil 1 10w30. It burned a lot of oil towards the end though. It would've been interesting to see how long the car would've lasted had I still owned it and kept up my previous practices.
 
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Bror, My 225 hp Audi TT roadster has a watercooled turbo. There is also an electric coolant pump that continues to circulate coolant through the turbo housing for about five minutes after shutdown to keep the oil from coking. Oil change interval, using an ACEA A3 rated oil, is 10k/1 year. Good luck with the new Sentra ...sounds like a fun car! Ted
 

davefr

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Well I treated the Supra to another round of Redline 10W30. The old Redline only went 2000 miles but had 1 year on it. I emailed Redline and they told me to either change it annually despite the miles or get the oil tested. Next time I think I'll try the oil analysis route. What parameter in oil analysis would show that I need to change oil based on the hygroscopic nature of the Esters? I've looked at UOAs and haven't seen a parameter that shows moisture in the oil. If I strive for maximum oil life based on time vs. mileage, what parameter(s) should I look for? P.S. Changing an oil filter in a Supra is miserable. I'd be surpised if Toyota could find a worse location for it.
 
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You think it's bad on a Supra? Try a filter change on a turbo Celica GTS. You have to unbolt all the turbo exhaust housing heat shielding and unbolt the airduct for the alternator. Royal pain in the *** .
 

Patman

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quote:
Originally posted by davefr: What parameter in oil analysis would show that I need to change oil based on the hygroscopic nature of the Esters? I've looked at UOAs and haven't seen a parameter that shows moisture in the oil.
Most labs do show how much water is in the oil, Blackstone gives you a percentage on their reports. Most reports tend to show very close to 0%.
 
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I run mobil 15w-50 in my 7m-gte supra, car is modded running 14 psi of boost(stock 6.8) and turbo is still alive with 136k miles on it. So there is no doubt in my mind of mobil 1's ability in a turbo motor. My friend runs mobil 1 0w-40 in his 94 bpu(400rwhp)supra turbo, stock twins are still alive at 80k miles and running 18psi of boost.
 
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