Recommendations for Switch and Wireless router

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I do not use Wifi and connect 3 computers and a Smart TV by LAN cables. The wireless router ended up next to my bedroom downstairs. Would like to move the wireless router upstairs by the Smart TV since someone is giving an Alexa Firestick to the owner of the house. The backstory is I have an older person, not very technical, that is not able to get back to Spectrum cable programs once she uses Netflix on her Smart TV. Her friends, net very technical are going to install a Fire Stick thinking she will able to control her TV with verbal commands. Occasionally she needs to update her Iphone or use her Ipad or leave the Wifi on when she has visitors. She recently asked if the wireless router could be set upstairs.

I found an article regarding placing a switch between and cable modem and and wireless router. I am thinking that is what I need, but I am not sure. I used up all 4 LAN ports on the Wireless router. Would be nice to have more LAN ports available. Looking for a Win/Win here. I think I need a Network Switch or do I need something else? What are your recommendations? I would like to buy what is needed before this weekend so can install when I am off work. I have a Micro Center down the street and Amazon Prime. I would need to order from Amazon soon to meet my deadline.

Security is a concern. I have had no problem with the TP Link wireless router. This may be time to upgrade if I can get a low profile one without the antennas sticking up and better security. There is not much room by the Smart TV. I appreciate your recommendations.
 
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You can pop in a network switch almost anywhere you need one and it will connect up all the cables coming into it. Each cable typically needs to be les that 100M.

Is your wireless router also a modem? That will make a difference in how you can configure things.

But a WIFI extender, preferably one made to work with your wireless router is an option.
 
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The modem to router is a separate network it needs to be its own link, which usually means a separate cat5e / cat6 cable. So the simplest thing is to pull two cat5e / 6 cables upstairs, use one to bring the WAN upstairs from the modem to the WAN port of the router, and another to send the LAN back downstairs-- from a LAN port of the router to your new switch downstairs and your wired endpoints there. You can use an unmanaged switch they are less than $20. Make sure to buy one that is gigabit (not "Fast" which is the old standard of 100 Mbit), even if your network isn't gigabit now things are rapidly moving that way. Also spend a few bucks more for 8 port instead of 5, as you prefer wired you know you're going to need it.
 
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MONKEYMAN

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The modem to router is a separate network it needs to be its own link, which usually means a separate cat5e / cat6 cable. So the simplest thing is to pull two cat5e / 6 cables upstairs, use one to bring the WAN upstairs from the modem to the WAN port of the router, and another to send the LAN back downstairs-- from a LAN port of the router to your new switch downstairs and your wired endpoints there. You can use an unmanaged switch they are less than $20. Make sure to buy one that is gigabit (not "Fast" which is the old standard of 100 Mbit), even if your network isn't gigabit now things are rapidly moving that way. Also spend a few bucks more for 8 port instead of 5, as you prefer wired you know you're going to need it.
That makes sense. I saw Micro Center has TP Link 8 port one for $20. Reviews said someone getting 500 to 600 Mbps speed with it. The issue is the cable. Amazon was way cheaper than them so need to price compare. Also it in in a crawl space, no fun to run a second one but it can be done. I think I am actually understanding. Thanks! With the blessing of OVERKILL makes it even better.
 
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yep started typing a reply earlier saw mk378 had it nailed decided to erase my mini book and eat dinner.
 
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I found an article regarding placing a switch between and cable modem and and wireless router. I am thinking that is what I need, but I am not sure. I used up all 4 LAN ports on the Wireless router. Would be nice to have more LAN ports available. Looking for a Win/Win here. I think I need a Network Switch or do I need something else? What are your recommendations? I would like to buy what is needed before this weekend so can install when I am off work. I have a Micro Center down the street and Amazon Prime. I would need to order from Amazon soon to meet my deadline.

Security is a concern. I have had no problem with the TP Link wireless router. This may be time to upgrade if I can get a low profile one without the antennas sticking up and better security. There is not much room by the Smart TV. I appreciate your recommendations.

Residential Internet modem comes with only 1 IP address / connection. This is why you need a router to share it among other devices and connections within your private network. To the outside world it only looks like 1 device. For business network they may have multiple connection / IP address provided for more cost, so you do not need a router in that case.

This is why you do not put a switch between modem and the router (you cannot plug in more device until the internet reach the router). You put a switch at 1 of the 4 output of the router and 'extend' the amount of ports you have. Basically the router internally has a 5 port switch and you are using 4 when the 5th is connected to the router's routing chip, and you are connecting switch to another switch to extend the amount you have.

I'm also happy with my TP Link, was using a Linksys N router for 10 years until it no longer work with video conferencing. IT at work trouble shoot it with me and it turns out when we use above 40Mbps, the router would drop enough traffic to cause our video conference to lose audio. After upgrading to a new TP Link router (Archer C8) it is no longer a problem all the way to 100Mbps.
 
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The modem to router is a separate network it needs to be its own link, which usually means a separate cat5e / cat6 cable. So the simplest thing is to pull two cat5e / 6 cables upstairs, use one to bring the WAN upstairs from the modem to the WAN port of the router, and another to send the LAN back downstairs-- from a LAN port of the router to your new switch downstairs and your wired endpoints there. You can use an unmanaged switch they are less than $20. Make sure to buy one that is gigabit (not "Fast" which is the old standard of 100 Mbit), even if your network isn't gigabit now things are rapidly moving that way. Also spend a few bucks more for 8 port instead of 5, as you prefer wired you know you're going to need it.
Alternative, is to set the upstair router as a bridge / access point only, and pull only 1 cable upstair. Have the cable plug into 1 of the 4 LAN port and it will have all traffic goes downstair to the main router to route, but you can still use the other 3 ports for ethernet cable use.
 
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One obvious thing I missed is that the proposed location is next to a TV, so if it is cable Internet and there is a cable run to the TV you could move both the router and the cable modem upstairs and connect the modem to the cable system by splitting it off of the TV feed. Then the existing single cat5e cable going downstairs will be all you need.

A trick when space is tight is to wall-mount the router behind the TV, they almost all have screw keyhole slots in the bottom to do that.

set the upstairs router as a bridge / access point only
This would only work if the (a) the cable modem is a modem / router not just a modem* and (b)you trust it and the cable company to route and firewall your whole network... which leads us to:

Security is a concern.
so no don't do that.

* also known as a Home Gateway, these usually have more than one Ethernet port and built in WiFi.
 
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MONKEYMAN

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Alternative, is to set the upstair router as a bridge / access point only, and pull only 1 cable upstair. Have the cable plug into 1 of the 4 LAN port and it will have all traffic goes downstair to the main router to route, but you can still use the other 3 ports for ethernet cable use.
PandaBear, you sure do have a lot of knowledge. Part of my issue is I do not and I am kinda not following you. I priced 2 Cat5e cables at Amazon at $9 each and the TP-Link LAN switch around $20 and have the blessing of the owner to move forward with that. I had an idea of attaching a string or wire to the old cable and attach that to the new cables to feed them through the crawl space. Drill a bigger hole, fishing some cable, and plugging LAN to the appropriate port is about my skill level. Thanks for the guidance!
 

MONKEYMAN

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One obvious thing I missed is that the proposed location is next to a TV, so if it is cable Internet and there is a cable run to the TV you could move both the router and the cable modem upstairs and connect the modem to the cable system by splitting it off of the TV feed. Then the existing single cat5e cable going downstairs will be all you need.

A trick when space is tight is to wall-mount the router behind the TV, they almost all have screw keyhole slots in the bottom to do that.


This would only work if the (a) the cable modem is a modem / router not just a modem* and (b)you trust it and the cable company to route and firewall your whole network... which leads us to:


so no don't do that.

* also known as a Home Gateway, these usually have more than one Ethernet port and built in WiFi.
It is Spectrum. They provided a Arris modem. I bought the TP-Link router when the owner of the house allowed someone to remote in to her computer and the old router thinking it was AOL Tech support. So the weak link regarding security sits behind the keyboard. The main line comes in through the basement, goes through an amplified splitter and is getting over the rated 200 Mbps. I would prefer to just go with plan A since I am pretty sure I understand and have less chance of messing up something. Thanks!
 
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We have spectrum and purchased our own modem and router, just because. Both devices were TP Link (docsis 3.0/ ac1750archer c7) and would highly recommend their products, 5 years of reliable stable service.
With that said, we just replaced all our equipment, five years running non stop it was just time for replacement/
New equipment that we purchased is Arris Modem and Motorola AC 2600 Model MR2600. Extremely happy with the router purchase and much research. I dont think anything can come close to its performance for range at its price point and double its price point. Range is far more important to me then the new WiFi 6 standard which is dubious value at this point in time and most likely at least a few years, by that time, the standard will be old anyway.
 

MONKEYMAN

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So the Cat cable and TP-Link 8 port switch should arrive Friday which is my birthday. If the install goes well it will be the best present. The TP-Link router has one feature that is most important, an external radio button. Makes it easy to turn Wifi on and off. It is small and just fits in the space behind the TV. I will report back on how it goes.
 
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PandaBear, you sure do have a lot of knowledge. Part of my issue is I do not and I am kinda not following you. I priced 2 Cat5e cables at Amazon at $9 each and the TP-Link LAN switch around $20 and have the blessing of the owner to move forward with that. I had an idea of attaching a string or wire to the old cable and attach that to the new cables to feed them through the crawl space. Drill a bigger hole, fishing some cable, and plugging LAN to the appropriate port is about my skill level. Thanks for the guidance!
Either way will work. For me it is easier to plug in some powerline ethernet adapter instead of fishing cables, and setting router as an access point and call it a day. I do have a few old routers, so that skew my opinion a bit.
 

MONKEYMAN

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Either way will work. For me it is easier to plug in some powerline ethernet adapter instead of fishing cables, and setting router as an access point and call it a day. I do have a few old routers, so that skew my opinion a bit.
My issue is I struggle with technical language/concepts. I have no idea what an access point is. I have read threads by Overkill and my eyes glazed over. Checked the crawl space and it is just opening a door and cable will be about 6 foot in with a lot of room. After that just 20 foot to the modem. I tend to do things different than others due to my limitations.
 

OVERKILL

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Residential Internet modem comes with only 1 IP address / connection. This is why you need a router to share it among other devices and connections within your private network. To the outside world it only looks like 1 device. For business network they may have multiple connection / IP address provided for more cost, so you do not need a router in that case.

Not quite accurate. In any scenario where masquerading is employed, you'll have one or more WAN-facing public IP(s) with one or more subnets utilizing non public routable private IP's behind it. This is true whether we are talking a small home setup with 10 devices or a hospital with thousands.

"Back in the day" when routable public IP's were cheap and large banks could be easily purchased it was not uncommon for a facility, be it a business, hospital or a school, to buy a huge chunk and just employ edge routing/firewalling of the subnet(s) they owned. When I was at Uni in the late 90's the school didn't employ any form of masquerading, every client on the entire network was provided with a publicly routable IP address that passed through an edge router/firewall that didn't really do much of anything except route packets. We had guys running FTP servers, web servers...etc. You could even register a domain if you wanted, since you had a public IP. It was a Gong Show. They later tightened up restrictions, blocked services with the main firewall (no Port 80, no port 443, no port 21...etc and they sniffed for servers on alternative ports) but kept the public IP scheme, which I thought was nuts, there's absolutely no reason to have students and staff with publicly routable IP's, it's a waste of a public subnet that could otherwise be carved up and used.

Anyways, rambling a bit, but my point being is that routing is employed when masquerading is not, so there's still a router or routers in play, they just aren't doing NAT/PAT.

I appreciate this is probably overly technical for this thread, but I suspect it is still of value to the collective.
 

OVERKILL

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It is Spectrum. They provided a Arris modem. I bought the TP-Link router when the owner of the house allowed someone to remote in to her computer and the old router thinking it was AOL Tech support. So the weak link regarding security sits behind the keyboard. The main line comes in through the basement, goes through an amplified splitter and is getting over the rated 200 Mbps. I would prefer to just go with plan A since I am pretty sure I understand and have less chance of messing up something. Thanks!

If you have a router behind a router you are doing double NAT and that's not benefiting you from a security perspective, FYI. But it can make it so certain sites on the internet aren't reachable because of MTU issues.
 

MONKEYMAN

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If you have a router behind a router you are doing double NAT and that's not benefiting you from a security perspective, FYI. But it can make it so certain sites on the internet aren't reachable because of MTU issues.
I know you just told me something important. I understand the words security perspective. I have read some of your posts on security. That is when my eyes glazed over. Do you have any recommendations in words I can understand or links so I can try to get up to speed? If certain sites aren't reachable I am sure the lady of the house will make me fix it immediately.
 

OVERKILL

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I know you just told me something important. I understand the words security perspective. I have read some of your posts on security. That is when my eyes glazed over. Do you have any recommendations in words I can understand or links so I can try to get up to speed? If certain sites aren't reachable I am sure the lady of the house will make me fix it immediately.

If the piece of equipment you got from your ISP is a modem/router combo, but you have another router behind it you are doing double-NAT, which is a no-no. You only want one device doing NAT/PAT, so if there were security concerns with that unit it should be factory reset and setup from scratch with a strong password that it sounds best that the individual we are discussing doesn't know.

The "other" router/gateway can then be setup as an access point and placed upstairs to provide WiFi up there.
To do this:
- Login to the device
- Setup LAN subnet to be the same as the one on the main router/gateway, so if it is 192.168.2.0/24, then you'd set it to be in the same subnet and make its LAN IP something easy to remember for you in case you need to change the config, so, using the aforementioned subnet, I'd make it 192.168.2.254.
- Disable the DHCP server
- Setup and secure the WiFi (WPA2-AES, strong password)
- Plug the cable coming from the downstairs router/gateway into one of the LAN ports on this one

Voila! You have a cheap access point wth integrated switch.

If both devices have WiFi, if you set them up with the same SSID and passphrase clients can less than gracefully roam between them.
 
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