Raybestos EHT3 Brakes squeaking

Joined
Jul 3, 2005
Messages
37,415
Location
NY
Out here, anything more than a barely visible film of lube on the pad ears will turn into “mud” on the sliding surfaces. It actually makes the situation worse.
I don't go crazy slopping it on. I've only visited CA it can be dusty, so point taken. Here the road salt leaves a lot to the imagination. If there's excess money in the snow removal budget our Village will salt in anticipation of a snow storm. Many times the storm will miss us, and we're driving around for days kicking up rock salt until it rains and washes it away. If they anticipate snow for a Monday it's a home for the guys who work the snow removal. Double time pay for salting on Sunday! lol
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
Messages
28,966
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Out here, anything more than a barely visible film of lube on the pad ears will turn into “mud” on the sliding surfaces. It actually makes the situation worse.
I totally get that! Climate in the area the vehicle operates changes many things, the amount of rust preventatives we need to use, anti seize, lubes, even the tools and techniques used to remove rotten fasteners and parts is way different from someone working in your or similar climate.
 
Joined
Jul 3, 2005
Messages
37,415
Location
NY
Are the brake hardware you using Stainless steel?
AFAIK yes. I've never seen my brake hardware rusted, but I do grease the parts. Rust here is a bitch, the last thing I need is parts freezing up from rust, especially when it's cold out.
 

Luftmasse

Thread starter
Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
1,237
Location
CA
AFAIK yes. I've never seen my brake hardware rusted, but I do grease the parts. Rust here is a bitch, the last thing I need is parts freezing up from rust, especially when it's cold out.
This is why I do not feel like it needs to be greased since the brake hardware does not rust.
 
Joined
Jun 3, 2002
Messages
8,974
Location
MI
This is why I do not feel like it needs to be greased since the brake hardware does not rust.
Again, in the rust belt it helps to be proactive. While the stainless hardware doesn't rust, the cast metal underneath the shims (pic below) and the pad ears themselves will rust, "grow in size", and bind up. Like member Rand already posted, the PasteLube product we use is miraculous in staying put, water proof, and a thin layer does not gum up much, if any. It keeps my hubs and rotor hats rust free - paper thin layer. https://goodson.com/collections/brake-lubes/products/bpl-2400-pastelub-brake-lubricant

1630087858480.png
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2018
Messages
1,180
Location
Southeast PA
I can understand the purpose of lubing between the bracket and the bracket clips. The caliper bracket is uncoated metal and can rust.

But the hardware is stainless and the pads are painted, so there really isn't a need for lube on the pad ears.
I live in the NE and stopped putting lube on the pad ears because after a while the pads get covered in junk and don't move properly. I have MUCH better results with out lube on the ears.
 

Luftmasse

Thread starter
Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
1,237
Location
CA
Again, in the rust belt it helps to be proactive. While the stainless hardware doesn't rust, the cast metal underneath the shims (pic below) and the pad ears themselves will rust, "grow in size", and bind up. Like member Rand already posted, the PasteLube product we use is miraculous in staying put, water proof, and a thin layer does not gum up much, if any. It keeps my hubs and rotor hats rust free - paper thin layer. https://goodson.com/collections/brake-lubes/products/bpl-2400-pastelub-brake-lubricant

View attachment 68672
I do lube below the brake hardware, but not the hardware themselves. Just sharing but Eric O, from South Main Auto is from Upstate NY, he does not lube the hardware nor the brake ears either. But it's fine, everyone has a preference.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
Messages
28,966
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
This is why I do not feel like it needs to be greased since the brake hardware does not rust.
The ears on the pads or the bracket are not stainless, that is where the rust bulges and stops pad movement. The CRC based on my experience keeps the rust to a minimum for about 3-4 years or a pad change cycle. No need to lather the thing up barely more than a burnish on iron is all that is needed.
 

Luftmasse

Thread starter
Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
1,237
Location
CA
The ears on the pads or the bracket are not stainless, that is where the rust bulges and stops pad movement. The CRC based on my experience keeps the rust to a minimum for about 3-4 years or a pad change cycle. No need to lather the thing up barely more than a burnish on iron is all that is needed.
Thank you for sharing your experience. :) Again, I do lube below the brake hardware, which is the bracket.
 

Luftmasse

Thread starter
Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
1,237
Location
CA
Just an update, the brakes were squeaking because the shims were shifted out of place.
 
Joined
Jul 3, 2005
Messages
37,415
Location
NY
This is why I do not feel like it needs to be greased since the brake hardware does not rust.
Different environment here, totally different. The pad ears can rust, I've done a few brake jobs for friends and found that to be common enough here.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2006
Messages
28,966
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Anyone who has done brakes on some of the VW cars have run into ones that use no brake hardware other than the pins, the pad ears ride directly on the iron and the caliper mounts to the strut knuckle with no bracket. these rot like crazy and suck bad, they get ridges in them sometimes that are too deep to file out and will bind the pads.
You must grease these or there is world of trouble waiting not too far down the road that will cost big $$$ for new knuckles. These are not stainless the machined areas is the actual cast iron.

moog-lk008-360-giant-01-05.jpg
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 28, 2014
Messages
1,039
Location
On the road Midwest
No car or pad is immune from this, some pads will make more noise than others on certain cars but its easy to almost or completely eliminate.
Make sure the shims are tight and all sliding surfaces on the bracket are clean and shiny, if the bracket is heavily rusted take a file to it to at least smooth it, a few pits are not an issue.

Coat all surfaces and the outside of the shims with CRC brake lube, it has silicone, moly, teflon, graphite and stays for a long time. Do not use this on pins, for those Sil-Glyde or silicone grease. The CRC is made for shimmed pads and works very well at reducing vibration which is the root cause of brake noise. These are the only two products I use now, after trying most of the products on the market nothing works better.


Thanks Trav. Good stuff.
 
Top