Pressure reducing valve and Neptune water meter

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I just thought I would post this to see if anyone else had run into this problem. I noticed the red dial indicator continuously turning on my water meter , indicating water running even when no faucet or other device was on. Points to a leak. I checked the water pressure and saw it to be 100 psi when the pressure reducing valve is set for 55 psi. This tells me the PRV is bad, so I thought that would be where the leak is. The PRV is 3 feet from the water meter underground. I dug up the PRV only to see it dry. Still, since it is not regulating properly, I replace it. To my surprise, even though the old PRV was not leaking, putting in the new valve stopped the indicator on the meter from turning. To sum it up, the defect in the PRV was somehow causing the water meter to register water running when it was not. This was a Neptune water meter. This amounted to approx. 1000 to 2000 gal. per month on my bill. While not that much money, I still wanted the problem corrected.
 
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If I understand your post correctly the PRV is before the meter? If so wouldn’t that be something your water provider is responsible for?
 
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I'm not a plumber, but a hydraulic engineer...so comments come from my experience in hydraulics.

If the pressure reducing valve is actually a pressure reducing and relieving valve (which would be safer for the downstream system), and it was downstream of the meter, I could see it dumping flow "to tank" (sewer?) if it was malfunctioning.
 
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If the pressure reducing valve is actually a pressure reducing and relieving valve (which would be safer for the downstream system), and it was downstream of the meter, I could see it dumping flow "to tank" (sewer?) if it was malfunctioning.

I've never seen a PRV used in residential applications that is also a relief valve. I have seen them used in commercial applications.
 
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I'm not a plumber, but a hydraulic engineer...so comments come from my experience in hydraulics.

If the pressure reducing valve is actually a pressure reducing and relieving valve (which would be safer for the downstream system), and it was downstream of the meter, I could see it dumping flow "to tank" (sewer?) if it was malfunctioning.
I have seen those in commercial apps (we have one at work)
but not residential.
 
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I've never seen a PRV used in residential applications that is also a relief valve. I have seen them used in commercial applications.
Years ago I was doing work at a place where a plumber was replacing a PRV. I didn't know much about them at the time, so he was happy to tell me about them. He said they use them in areas where the water pressure is abnormally high, coming into a residence. like if you lived in a town where they had a water tower. Just the normal pressure from the tower would cause problems if it wan't reduced after it left the tower. The closer you lived to the tower , you could see main pressure up to 200 psi. That would blow most household plumbing apart.,,
 
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Years ago I was doing work at a place where a plumber was replacing a PRV. I didn't know much about them at the time, so he was happy to tell me about them. He said they use them in areas where the water pressure is abnormally high, coming into a residence.

I bought a house in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. The location is important, because I think it explains a lot about what happened. I noticed that the water pressure coming into the house was VERY high. It pegged a 100PSI gauge. I called the water company, which is part of the county government, and asked what is going on with the water pressure. The lady who answered the phone said, "Oh, we made some changes to our system. You can call a plumber to get a pressure regulator installed".

Absolutely no care given, let's just "make some changes" and potentially damage the customer's plumbing. Nobody I talked with in the neighborhood had any idea that their water pressure had increased, or that it could cause damage. (I would expect, if the water company weren't run by complete morons, that they'd at least have let the affected customers know...)

Worth noting that the house was built in 1975 and this happened in 2002.

I called a plumber to install a PRV and the plumber also had to come back to install an expansion tank on the water heater because a PRV absolutely prevents any backflow out to the main, so the water heater's TPR valve would sometimes drip. The expansion tank fixed that.
 
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the water heater's TPR valve would sometimes drip.
This^^^ as No. 1 suspect. Beyond that look at any other automatic valves you may have . Sprinkler shutoff valves, toilets tanks that are always full to overflowing. Hissing sounds coming from the washing machine etc. If your water heater has a catch pan plumbed to drain make sure it is dry.
 

wayne55

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If I understand your post correctly the PRV is before the meter? If so wouldn’t that be something your water provider is responsible for?
Thanks for reading, but the PRV is after the meter, between meter and house.
 
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Water services can be a pain to deal with. I had a water leak on the company side of the meter. They came out and replaced the line that services my meter. Great, everything was good. First thing I noticed all of the hot water faucets in the house started to seep. I thought OK, no big deal, they were all old and probably needed new parts. Then the hot water heater started leaking and not from the pop off valve. Again OK the thing was about 15 years old. Replaced the water heater and when I got it up and running the pop off valve was seeping. At this point (I'm slow) I decided that something is not right. Went out to my meter and spotted a new device installed on the company side of the meter. Called the company and they said yes we installed a check valve and they are required to it any time they service a meter line. It turns out I needed to install an expansion tank. What the heck! If they had just told me what they had done. With the check valve the pressure in the house plumbing would sky rocket when the water heater got the hot water temp up. The system had no way of absorbing the expanding water. Expansion tank cured the problem.
 

hrv

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Thanks for reading, but the PRV is after the meter, between meter and house.
Here is Louisville the PRV is located before the actual water meter...So THEY are responsible for repair on it. I know because I had mine replaces a few years ago.....They do go bad over time....Anything AFTER the water meter is your responsibility...
 
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Do you have a expansion tank on the cold water line off water heater? Need to check its operation. 60 lb water pressure set tank pressure at 60. Get any water out of air side tank is bad needs to be replaced.
 
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