NEW ECOBOOST V-6 ENDURES ENGINE BOOT CAMP

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NEW ECOBOOST V-6 ENDURES ENGINE ‘BOOT CAMP’ * Strict Ford Motor Company engine “boot camp” testing regimen ensures quality and durability as the 3.5-liter EcoBoost™ V-6 engine is introduced on the 2010 Lincoln MKS; Ford Flex, Taurus SHO and Lincoln MKT also will have EcoBoost availability this year * EcoBoost is one of Ford’s key initiatives to deliver significant fuel economy advancements of up to 20 percent without sacrificing the performance feel customers want * The new 3.5-liter engine is the first in a wave of EcoBoost engines coming as part of Ford’s strategy to bring affordable fuel efficiency improvements to millions. By 2013, more than 90 percent of Ford’s North American lineup will be available with EcoBoost technology Ford Eco Boost Forum - The arrival of the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine is eagerly anticipated by customers who want power without sacrificing fuel economy. Debuting in the 2010 Lincoln MKS this summer, the twin-turbocharged, direct-injection 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine delivers the horsepower of a normally aspirated V-8 with the fuel efficiency of a normally aspirated V-6. To ensure the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine delivers quality performance, a team of engineers subjected it to an extensive battery of tests as part of the company’s engine “boot camp.” “EcoBoost was engineered with a relentless, disciplined focus on quality that required a zero-defect mindset from engineers and our supplier partners,” said Derrick Kuzak, group vice president of Global Product Development. “The finished product will represent the best combination of production-ready engine technologies of today, poised and ready to deliver the performance, fuel efficiency and value that customers expect.” The extensive testing to prove out the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine was accomplished through three avenues – using computer aided engineering models (CAE), in the lab with dynamometers and on roads in the real world. Between testing on the dyno and in the field, EcoBoost engines have racked up the equivalent of more than 1 million miles of customer driving. EcoBoost System and Component Testing The rigid testing includes 20 individual dynamometer-level tests designed to push the engine to its limits. The testing protocol verifies the reliability of the complete engine system under maximum engine speeds and loads, coolant and oil temperature and customer driving patterns. The Road Cycle Durability test, for example, is designed to replicate real-world customer driving and vehicle maintenance patterns. For this test, engines with EcoBoost technology were subjected to 1,000 cold starts, followed by sustained operation at peak torque and peak power. During the course of the test, engine coolant temperatures ranged from 12 degrees Celsius (about 53 degrees Fahrenheit) to 95 degrees Celsius (203 degrees Fahrenheit). In total, this single test required 1,000 hours of extreme engine operation, representing more than 60,000 miles of customer driving. “This was a critical test for us, and the EcoBoost fleet passed with flying colors,” said Brett Hinds, Ford’s Advanced Engine Design and Development manager said. “We’re confident that EcoBoost is ready to provide consistent performance in varied conditions.” Individual components undergo rigorous proving as well. EcoBoost’s twin turbochargers, for example, are designed to run at a very high temperature – up to 950 degrees Celsius (1,740 degrees Fahrenheit). Ford engineers proved out the turbochargers by running them at 950 degrees Celsius for 10 minutes and then “shocking” the turbos by running them at room temperature for 10 minutes. The tests were repeated at maximum boost continuously for hundreds of hours, under far more severe conditions than customers are expected to dish out. Designed for a life cycle of 150,000 miles or 10 years, EcoBoost’s turbochargers feature water-cooled bearing jackets. This architecture is designed to prevent oil “coking” that could occur in previous-generation turbochargers. The new design means that EcoBoost drivers don’t need to observe special operating precautions, such as idling the engine before switching it off. EcoBoost also endured Ford’s standard engine durability test signoff running at maximum revs and turbo boost for the equivalent of 15 straight days or 360 hours. As the first Ford EcoBoost engine makes its production debut, it has earned its stripes in Ford’s engine boot camp. It uses that same grade of 5W20 engine oil specified by Ford for gasoline engines, and oil changes are scheduled at the same 7,500-mile intervals. The EcoBoost system is part of Ford’s commitment to deliver the best fuel economy in each new vehicle. The new 3.5-liter engine is the first in a wave of EcoBoost engines coming as part of Ford’s strategy to bring affordable fuel efficiency improvements to millions. By 2013, more than 90 percent of Ford’s North American lineup will be available with EcoBoost technology. COLLABORATION WITH PARTNERS KEY TO ECOBOOST’S INDUSTRY-LEADING FUEL-CHARGING SYSTEM, OUTPUT * Holistic, systems approach used to fine-tune each subsystem of Ford Motor Company’s new 3.5-liter EcoBoost™ V-6 engine for optimized function and performance. The engine debuts in the 2010 Lincoln MKS luxury sedan this summer and also will be available this year on the Ford Flex, Taurus SHO and Lincoln MKT * New fuel rail developed to handle demands of the new 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine, which delivers fuel through two rails that are pressurized up to 2,150 PSI * The 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine – the first V-6 direct-injection twin-turbocharged engine produced in North America – is one of Ford’s key initiatives to deliver fuel economy advancements of up to 20 percent without sacrificing the performance feel customers want Ford EcoBoost Forum - The new twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter EcoBoost™ V-6 engine – which debuts in the 2010 Lincoln MKS this summer – is a complex, carefully balanced machine. But developing a new engine technology of this magnitude required unprecedented collaboration with supplier partners. The result is an engine that delivers V-8 power with V-6 fuel economy, by optimizing the additional power gained from turbochargers and combining it with the efficiency of direct fuel injection. To deliver this performance, each component required special attention to help maximize the potential of combining these existing technologies in a new approach. That meant Ford needed to forge new bonds with its suppliers as its engineers developed the EcoBoost system. Just as the success of the engine is tied to the quality of its various components, so too is Ford’s ability to create groundbreaking solutions tied to its supply partners. Fuel-Charging System Engineering Collaboration The twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine’s enhanced fuel-charging system, and the fuel pipe that feeds them, are good examples of the collaboration between Ford and its suppliers – in this case Bosch. The fuel pressures in the EcoBoost’s direct-injection system can reach up to 2,150 PSI, more than 35 times the norm seen in a conventional port-fuel-injected V-6, and required specific engineering to meet the required robustness as well as improved function. Most fuel systems also are broken into subsystems such as fuel pump, fuel lines, fuel rails and injectors. But, there are significant common factors that affect the entire system performance – such as fuel flow, thermal distribution, fuel distribution, NVH and hydraulic pulsations. Those input factors require system tuning and design techniques to improve the whole system performance, which is achieved by combining the technical expertise and resources offered by the supplier and OEM. “Our own Ford Vehicle Benchmarking Center showed that many suppliers applied a common practice design approach of ‘one size fits all’ and with little consideration as to how the subsystems could be fine-tuned for optimized function and performance,” said Joseph Basmaji, direct injection fuel system technical specialist. For example, hydraulic pulsations – or hammering – is a common issue in all direct-injection fuel systems and can cause a range of issues, from poor fuel distribution to component durability. Knowing how to address these pulsations in each of the subsystems is critical to being able to effectively reduce the pulsations of the entire system to an acceptable level and achieve optimized performance. The Ford and Bosch teams worked for months to develop hydraulic models and prototypes to provide the data leading to optimized orifice sizing, placement and spacing in order to tune in the hydraulic frequencies in each of the subsystems. “As a result, hydraulic pulsations to the entire system could be reduced, providing better fuel distribution for improved component durability, function, performance and reduced emissions,” Basmaji said. Another new approach used on the EcoBoost engine is the bolting pattern for the high-pressure fuel rails. Ford’s collaboration with Bosch led to a fastening design concept that incorporates a criss-cross pattern across the rail, as opposed to brackets on one side of the rail only. This pattern reduces the moment arm on the rail as well as some of the high stresses that can result because of the tendency for the rail to lift under the 2,150 PSI hydraulic pressure of the fuel. “Close collaboration with our suppliers and sub-suppliers also helped us in the design and development of a fully automated fuel-charging assembly and rundown station at Cleveland Engine Plant. It’s the first of its kind and possibly a benchmark for the industry,” Basmaji said. Y-Pipe Fuel Delivery System Ford and Bosch also developed a new Y-pipe fuel delivery system, rather than a conventional multi-pipe system, to feed the fuel rails. The Y-pipe method provided several advantages in a direct injection system, including reduced pulsations, hydraulic frequency separation, improved fuel distribution and assembly improvements. The Y-pipe also fills both rail halves simultaneously, as opposed to a multi-pipe system, where one rail must fill completely before filling the other rail. This solution reduces green start times at the vehicle plant as well as vehicle start time in the field. “Development of the Y-pipe was a first for us and a first for Bosch,” Basmaji said. The Y-pipe also provides better fuel thermal distribution, minimizing fuel distribution issues from fluid density changes. “The result is a more-precise delivery of the fuel mass required for a more-efficient fuel burn in the combustion chamber and better fuel economy,” Basmaji said. “The fuel distribution is improved bank to bank as well as injector to injector. That’s very critical and one of the major reasons our fuel-charging system runs as well as it does.” Developing new methods of engineering and strong relationships with partners are key to Ford being able to develop world-class technologies and maintaining a leadership position with systems such as EcoBoost. “We don’t just take technologies at face value; instead, we work with our partners to drive better technologies,” Basmaji said. “We know we have to be better than the competition and that’s what we’re out to do.” Twin Turbochargers a New Approach for Gasoline Engines The EcoBoost system uses two Honeywell GT15 turbochargers – one on each bank working in tandem – to harness exhaust gas to pump V-8 power out of the smaller-displacement V-6 engine. This technology – in conjunction with direct fuel injection – allows EcoBoost to punch above its size in terms of power and responsiveness. The 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 is the first gasoline direct-injection twin-turbocharged engine produced in North America. Close collaboration between Ford and Honeywell created a system that met Ford’s rigorous durability and safety criteria with such refinement that the driver never notices the turbocharger operation. Sophisticated electronic controls balance boost and torque levels to give the driver the feeling of continuous torque delivery without turbo “whines” and “whooshes” that characterized some previous-generation turbocharger engines. “One of the principles behind EcoBoost is that it isn’t intrusive,” said Keith Plagens, Turbo System Engineer. “EcoBoost delivers added power seamlessly. Using Honeywell’s GT15 turbochargers gave us the performance feel and low-end response our customers demand.” The turbocharger system features a pressure-controlled waste gate with an internal valve set at the Honeywell factory to within 3/10ths of a PSI. “That means our side-to-side balance is well controlled and, again, gives the customer seamless operation,” Plagens said. Exhaust gas flowing through the turbocharger spins a turbine wheel at very high speed – approximately 170,000 rpm – which drives a compressor turbine on the clean-air side of the turbo. This fan effect densely packs intake air into the engine – compressed air up to 12 PSI that results in increased performance. With its twin turbochargers, the EcoBoost V-6 swallows about 25 percent more air than its normally aspirated cousin, the 3.5-liter Duratec V-6. The EcoBoost approach eliminates several customer worries from previous turbocharger applications. Designed for long-life reliability, EcoBoost’s turbochargers feature water-cooled bearing jackets. This architecture is designed to prevent oil “coking” that could occur in previous-generation turbochargers. The new design means that EcoBoost drivers don’t need to observe special operating precautions, such as idling the engine before switching it off. The turbochargers are designed for a life cycle of at least 150,000 miles or 10 years. About EcoBoost The 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine – the first V-6 direct-injection twin-turbocharged engine produced in North America – is one of Ford’s key initiatives to deliver significant fuel economy advancements without sacrificing the performance feel customers want. By 2013, more than 90 percent of Ford’s North American lineup will be available with EcoBoost technology – part of the company’s strategy to bring affordable fuel efficiency improvements to millions.
 
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sounds like a really strong engine, and the turbochargers should last more then 10 years/150,000 miles with those stress tests i want one in a 2010 taurus sho!
 
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If you can build a turbo V6 with the same fuel mileage as your non turbo V6, you've got some serious problems with your n/a V6 technology.
 
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 Originally Posted By: MrCritical
If you can build a turbo V6 with the same fuel mileage as your non turbo V6, you've got some serious problems with your n/a V6 technology.
Yea, until you write the check for some of the turbo repairs. Then the n/a version looks a lot better.
 
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I like the direct-injection part. I am not sure I like the separate turbo for each bank of cylinders' part. This is a potential nightmare, if the boost control sensors and actuators do not work perfectly then the car will run but not very well.
 
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I don't care HOW well they are cooling those turbos, I would NOT run 'conventional' 5W-20 7500 miles in a twin-turbo engine. I'd run M1 5W-20/0W-20. That stuff can take the heat!
 
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I've said this many times. The proliferation of "mass-market" turbocharged engines is going to suck for used car buyers. I don't care how well the engines are designed. The way 90% of all American's take care of their cars... I would not want to buy a used turbocharged car (ANY type) with more than probably 50k of abuse
 
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I assume that it must run on premium gas since they don't mention it runs on regular as a "feature"... What are the horsepower and fuel economy numbers, anyway? Given recent and well-publicized engine oil sludge issues other manufacturers have experienced, I wonder if a "sludge test" is part of their (or anyone else's) testing sequence. I would imagine such a test would take a long time to implement.
 
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 Originally Posted By: terminaldegree
I assume that it must run on premium gas since they don't mention it runs on regular as a "feature"... What are the horsepower and fuel economy numbers, anyway? Given recent and well-publicized engine oil sludge issues other manufacturers have experienced, I wonder if a "sludge test" is part of their (or anyone else's) testing sequence. I would imagine such a test would take a long time to implement.
I don't think other manufacturers are relevant except those who water cooled their turbos. Most of them didn't or do not.
 
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badtlc, I'm pretty sure manufacturers have been "water cooling" stock turbos since the 1980's. Anyhow, my comment was mostly directed at the 7500 mile oci on semi-synthetic or straight dino oil; we know how well that's worked out for Saab, Volvo, Chrysler, Toyota, etc. This of course assumes the end-user follows the maintenance schedule at all... I'm excited to see this new engine, but like anything else coming from the domestic auto industry, I'm not going to be an "early adopter" until they work the bugs out with the beta testers...erm...customers. hone eagle, Thanks for the info on regular gas and mpg... some good news there!
 
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 Originally Posted By: eljefino
electric water pump would be a good idea for running after turbo shutdown.
But not foolproof,the siphon system is passive and will not fail unless you let all the water get out on to the road.
 
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 Originally Posted By: badtlc
I don't think other manufacturers are relevant except those who water cooled their turbos. Most of them didn't or do not.
Who doesnt water cool from the factory? I know Ford, Mazda, Volvo, VW and Mitsubishi do or at least used to.
 
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 Originally Posted By: Dyoel182
 Originally Posted By: badtlc
I don't think other manufacturers are relevant except those who water cooled their turbos. Most of them didn't or do not.
Who doesnt water cool from the factory? I know Ford, Mazda, Volvo, VW and Mitsubishi do or at least used to.
Volvo used to oil-cool. I assumed (i guess wrongly) they still do. VW has some oil cooled turbos. EDIT: apparently quite a few used water and oil cooling. Mazda appears to do this along with Nissan and maybe Mitsubishi?
 
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 Originally Posted By: MrCritical
If you can build a turbo V6 with the same fuel mileage as your non turbo V6, you've got some serious problems with your n/a V6 technology.
Turbos can be used to increase mpgs.
 
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Excellent commentary. I concur. In addition to used car buyers it will also bite the manu in the arse as well.
 Originally Posted By: astraelraen
I've said this many times. The proliferation of "mass-market" turbocharged engines is going to suck for used car buyers. I don't care how well the engines are designed. The way 90% of all American's take care of their cars... I would not want to buy a used turbocharged car (ANY type) with more than probably 50k of abuse
 
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