Moog Vertical Control Arm Bushings - Bearing Type

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24,438
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CA
Some of you may have seen my thread on the 2004 Lexus RX330. It is a pro-bono job for my landlord. The car has worn lower control arm bushings. Since Toyota does not sell bushings separately, the options were either OE arms ($400) or aftermarket control arms ($70-$110). While she begrudgingly approved the OE arms due to durability concerns of the aftermarket arms, the cost of the OE arms is a bit asinine. After doing some additional research, it appears that Moog does make a "spherical design" control arm bushing for this application. The Moog bushing is a ball-and-socket bearing that is permanently lubricated (and sealed), and take the place of the OE-style rubber control arm bushing. http://www.moogparts.com/pdf/problemsolv..._failure_EN.pdf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-FthbeJ-sw Does anyone have experience with this specific Moog product? I am mainly curious about the durability and ride quality. I searched some of the part numbers on Amazon and some folks complained about knocking sounds from this "bushing." Thanks.
 
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13,463
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ROCHESTER, NY
Not the bushings themselves but, I have replaced many control arms using the MOOG control arms(tie rods, stabilizer bar links etc.) and the overall ride quality is like OE. However as I have stated in your shock/strut thread for this same RX330, OE especially LEXUS, is always the best for longevity.
 
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13,247
Location
Indiana
Looks like this Lexus suffers from the same issues the Volvo P2's suffer from. Some Volvo guys have gone straight to poly vertical bushings for increased durability.
 
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2,224
Location
Lyndhurst NJ
Ive had serious issues with Moog quality in the past few years, mostly on european vehicles, but ive had to warranty a few pieces made by them.
 
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26,432
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MA, Mittelfranken.de
Like I said in the other thread I use them on some GM cars, so far non knock but I can think of a few reasons they would. Installation error of the bushing in the arm where the boot gets nicked by whatever they are using to press it it with or installation in the car also where the boot gets damaged or worn suspension components. If the suspension can move enough for the ball to hit the outer sleeve it could knock, worn springs, shocks and bad bump stops would allow this. Poly in for this type of bushing is also very good as it wont squeak but those from Energy will ride hard as they use the same hard durometer for everything. If PSB makes one it will be a softer and not stiffen the ride but they are a little more expensive from what I can tell the PSB 689 is the one for the RX. As far as aftermarket arms go don't bother, its honestly a 50% failure rate regardless if its Moog, TRW, Lemforderer, etc. The failure is with the alignment and the amount of adjustment available to correct it. I have had identical arms with the same part number where one is fine and the other fail camber and its replacement fail caster, consistent quality is not their strong point. 2 Moog arms failed caster and their replacements failed camber to a non correctable degree, getting the parts changed under warrant is no problem its the $75 alignment every time. Now I use OE arms only or replace the bushings if the arm isn't rotten.
 
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378
Location
Reno, Nevada
I’d go with the OEM parts. Very good of you to be going out of your way to help her and also find the best possible prices, but you’re assuming some risk with the Moog bushings or any other aftermarket parts. Good feeling to help a deserving person with a car repair. Not so good if you have to do it twice. I haven’t looked but you may be able to find a better price for the OEM parts from a discount online parts dealer. Moog used to be an iconic name but it seems not so much anymore. Too bad.
 
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36,643
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ME
Originally Posted By: Langanobob
Good feeling to help a deserving person with a car repair.
Not knowing all the details but I expect his landlady is a leg up on him moneywise. Also see, OMG I have a flashy Lexus status symbol but can't afford not to/ choose to get it fixed on the side. That all said when Critic's the age of his landlady I expect him to be running a small island nation. LOL
 
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953
Location
Rio Rancho, NM
I would stick with OEM. Although, every application is different and unique. I've compared aftermarket to Mitsubishi and Mitsu wins. But, the cost can be a game changer for most. I enjoy peace of mind and only doing the job once. Respectfully, Pajero!
 
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12,503
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OH
Originally Posted By: eljefino
Not knowing all the details but I expect his landlady is a leg up on him moneywise. Also see, OMG I have a flashy Lexus status symbol but can't afford not to/ choose to get it fixed on the side. That all said when Critic's the age of his landlady I expect him to be running a small island nation. LOL
I remember the story about your old landlady. In the winter time you would wait till she leaves then hook up a hose to the hot water heater and wash the car. smile
 

The Critic

Thread starter
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24,438
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CA
New parts: Passenger Side Arm: Driver Side Arm: Rear mount unbolted (bottom only), front mount unbolted (top and bottom), dogbone mount removed, passenger side mount removed. Engine/Trans are supported with a large piece of wood under the engine oil pan. Pole jack is there for preventing the CV axle from coming apart: Done (before final tightening of the rear bushing, which was done after the car was on the ground): For this particular RX, we decided to go with OE. However, I have other owners who are interested in the Moog bushings, so the 3 pairs I ordered will not go to waste. More to come. LCA replacement on these SUV's (or any FWD Toyota V6) is not a job for a novice. Every engine and transmission mount was either removed or unbolted in order to raise the powertrain. The subframe (on the driver side) had to be lowered slightly in order for the driver side transmission mount to come out. Careful attention must be given to the CV axles while lifting the engine/transmission or else you can damage the CV axles. The dealer quotes 4-6 hours for this job, so with OE arms and alignment, the price comes out to $1500-$2k. It took me around 3.5 hours, but I started on this one late in the day...so I was slow. If I had to do it again, I can do it in about 2 hours. After replacement of the control arms only, the car drives significantly better. The steering feel is much improved (more accurate) and road dampening is mildly improved. Even the owner noticed right away.
 
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3,646
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Worst Case, Ontario
Originally Posted By: The Critic
LCA replacement on these SUV's (or any FWD Toyota V6) is not a job for a novice. Every engine and transmission mount was either removed or unbolted in order to raise the powertrain. The subframe (on the driver side) had to be lowered slightly in order for the driver side transmission mount to come out. Careful attention must be given to the CV axles while lifting the engine/transmission or else you can damage the CV axles.
Sounds like you need a lift, too.
 

The Critic

Thread starter
Messages
24,438
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CA
Originally Posted By: maxdustington
Sounds like you need a lift, too.
Lift is not required, having 2 floor jacks should be adequate. But getting the ball joint back into the control arm can be a bit difficult. Being able to do it while standing up makes the job a lot easier...
 
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1,604
Location
Austin, TX
Since most of the mounts need to be loosened and side ones removed, were the side ones in decent shape to be reused.!! Your observations and would replacing side mounts be a worth when doing the LCA job
 
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