Laundry dryer dilema.

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16,150
Location
Silicon Valley
It is a 14 year old Whirlpool commercial coin operated electric dryer (CE2950XY) for an apartment complex. Replacing it is not an option because it is $1300-1600 for a new one. If you press the start cycle button after putting in the correct value, it would run for a while (like 15 mins) and stop. Then you can press the start again and it would run for a while. After couple cycles of restarting, you need to wait for a while before you can restart it. The motor is new (burnt), had replaced the fuse a few years ago, but currently suspecting the timer ($94), push button assembly ($116), door switch ($20), thermostats ($14 and $18), belt (low cost), and the ring bearing ($26) of the tumbler. I am a bit concern about the timer and push button assembly's cost, and think I would replace everything else I mentioned up there. Any recommendation on what else to look for and how to inspect?
 
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Messages
5,573
Location
earth
sounds like it overheats and then cuts out as a safety measure. or a poor contact somewhere. sorry, i'm no expert.
 
Messages
1,340
Location
minneapolis mn
if it were a bad high temperature limit control, the dryer would continue to run, and the heater would cycle on and off on the limit control. Does the dyer heat up normally currently? I work with some guys that are former appliance repair folks and I will see what they recommend and get back to you this evening.
 
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Messages
8,711
Location
Nothern USA
What you need to do is open it up and run it until it quits. Then use a voltage detector to find out where the power stops. It could also be the relay the start button controls. I came across the niftiest gadget for trouble shooting, a voltage detector. They work through the insulation of wires. There are several brands. I have a GB Instruments GVD-505A, less than $15 at Home Depot. Touch it to a hot wire, and the end glows red. Find the doodad that lights it on one side, and not the other, and you have the culprit. You do not have to open up housings and expose electrical contacts. You are looking at where your hand is, not where the meter is. Most people are capable of doing repairs and will get it going and not get hurt if they use a little sense. The voltage detector makes it even easier.
 
Messages
8,711
Location
Nothern USA
Yes, and even throw in $200 labor from a service man, it is money staying here. New ones tend to be unfixable, requiring a new $300 circuit board.
 
Messages
39,806
Location
Pottstown, PA
I would suspect that the belt drive would melt before tripping it out ..I could be wrong in regard to a commercial unit. I went through 3 drum bearing kits on one unit trying to keep up with my wife when the kids were younger.
 

PandaBear

Thread starter
Messages
16,150
Location
Silicon Valley
Thanks guys, it seems like you really can find every answer on BITOG off topic. The motor was burnt replaced a few months ago, but not the belt because of its hard to reach and seems ok. The timer and start button control (assuming where the relay is also) are about $100 each, but all other parts are cheap (around $10-20 each). There are 2 thermostat. 1 integrated into the heater and the other in the air pathway along the blower. The dryer would stop in all heat mode (low, mid, high) and the unit is hot. We have a few cheapskate that overload the unit with 50% full and trip the motor in the past, so I suspect overloading is just common here. Something tells me it is the thermostat related, but other symptoms tells me it is not. I'm thinking about replacing all but the timer and the start button relay, and see if the other "preventive maintenance" would keep it running. I heard that a failed timer would run the system indefinitely, but not sure what would a failed relay be like. Have a volt meter, and will wear insulated clothing and test out the voltage of failed pieces.
 

PandaBear

Thread starter
Messages
16,150
Location
Silicon Valley
Venting is good, everything has been cleaned multiple times for failure analysis purpose. Did more investigation and looks like I can eliminate a few more items: 1) The air pathway is intake->heater->drum->fan->vent. 2) The heater thermostat breaks a one time use fuse that would only stop the heat. Since heat is still there, this piece is working. 3) The drum bearing is plastic and is supported by the front panel, and it is easy to replace at any time. 4) Failure in roller and bearing would trip the over current of the motor, or burn it, but not cause a time/temperature based safety trip. 5) Door switch seems to be working fine, and shouldn't cause time/temperature based tripping 6) When it trip, if I open the door and let the heat out, the recovery time would be shorter. So I think it is the thermostat in the fan assembly. I've ordered the parts, and we'll find out what's the case.
 
Messages
19,479
Location
Chicago Area
Save your time and costs for testing equiptment. Buy everything you listed and install it. Not really a loss, just maintenance for 'not bad yet' parts.
 
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