Hyundai and Kia fire recall

CKN

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Holy smokes, im shocked at the amount of hate against Hyundai / Kia in this thread.

Here is my 2 cents on the 2.4L and 2.0L turbos, after owning at least a half a dozen Hyundai and Kia vehicles in the last 15 years with almost all of them in "problematic" years. 11-16.

No, ive NEVER had an issue with the 2.4L or 2.0L Turbo engines.
Yes, i did keep up on OCI 5-6K max with a full synthetic, and OEM filter.
Yes i did keep then engine full of oil
No, not one engine i've had has consumed any measurable amount of oil even after 6000 miles.
Yes, These engine do see WOT, and sometime often.

I'm not saying that they dont have not issues but I think a lot of it comes back to owner maintenance, 7500 OCI+ on regular dealer bulk oil, being under filled if you go "by the book", and then "IF" an issue does pop up and the 2.4L or 2.0L start burning oil the owners do not notice it and in turn the engines run very low on oil and then blow. And I'm also not saying that some of them came from the factory with a defect which SOME did but not all of them and not all of the 2.4 L or the 2.0 L turbo's are a ticking time bomb. Ive never had to warranty one of mine 2.4L or 2.0L Turbo engines, and they are NOT babied, but I keep a extremely strict regimen with the oil changes OEM filters now and 5 to 6000 miles max it works out to changing the oil twice a year.
And here's even another thought it appears most of spec books put the oil change amount at 4.5 QTS for the 2.4L... In ALL of my Hyundai Engines i've added almost an additional full qt of oil to bring it to the full mark on the stick. How many of these 2.0s and 2.4L are running 1 quart low right after an all change and then for the whole duration of the oil change interval... Heres a photo of the KIa engine and somewhere along the line "4.5 WF" was written with pen on the air intake. the 4.5 qts puts it just below the add mark on the stick. i had to add a additional 1.1 qts for it to be "full". Same with our Sonata 2.4L that will actually take almost 6 quarts(5.9) to bring it to the full mark after an hour drain...
I would rather a company be super transparent then to sweep things under the rug. Yeah it took Hyundai being sued but they did address and warranty way more motors then they should've in my opinion. I think a lot of these motors failed because of maintenance issues running low on oil etc... Hyundai is not a company with a squeaky clean record but everything is out in the open in terms of recalls, TSB, customer improvement programs, motor issues etc. and they do appear to address the people that do have issues a majority of the time. Again I'm not saying that they will not deny you because there are stories of people being denied but majority of the time Hyundai does work with the consumer and nine times out of 10 they do replace motors and address issues via TSB's or recalls.. I know it does not look great on paper but in my opinion again it's because everything's out in the open unlike some other manufacturers that hide very large issues or blame others.

OT: im taking the kia in today to have not 1, 2, but 3 different recalls done.. Its a 10 year old kia that is still supported at the dealer. They will do the knock sensor update for the lifetime warranty on the motor, then add a fuse into the AC wiring to prevent fires, and they are even going to rustproof the car again.. In my opinion there's not too many manufacturers that will still support and work on a 10+ year old car..

I know some will take this as me putting a Hyundai on a pedestal but I've owned a few different manufactured cars such as the Acura TL type S that blew the transmission before 80K miles and the dealer told us to kick sand even after changing the fluid ever 20K with OEM fluid or what about ford and the 3.8L, yep blew two those engines before 100,000K. neither one of those issues made the publicity the Hyundai's have had, but the Acura transmission would literally lock up at 80 miles an hour on the Thruway the potential of a crash, and the dealer looked the other way..

Thats my 2 cents plus some...



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This is BITOG. There is as a matter of routine Hyundai and CVT hate. Many guys on here love the same flavor Kool-Aid.
 
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I really wanted to stop reading what you had to say after the first few sentences. First, you are a H/K fanboy, that’s okay, but a fanboy overlooks the negative and only highlights the positive. Second, those recalls…You must be confused how a recall works. Recalls typically have no expiration date, so of course the dealers will do it on a 10 year old car. The rustproofing recall is being done because it’s….a recall. Hyundai/Kia aren’t doing it out of the goodness of their heart. I suggest you research how recalls work, I’ll give you a hint, manufacturers don’t just wake up one day and say, “let’s be a nice company and issue a recall for our flaws and defects”. I also suggest you research about South Korean corporate business culture. They are tight lipped about everything, good thing we have governing bodies that protect the consumer is this regard. I’m sorry that your Acura and Ford had issues, did they pose an actual safety hazard though? Engine and transmission failures usually have warning symptoms before they fail. The Hyundai rod bearing failures often exhibit no warning signs before failing, giving the vehicle operator little to no chance to pull to safety.
OK you’re mostly right. But I’m not blind to the fact that some Hyundai engines do indeed blow. It comes down to how the company handles it in my opinion. Even if a recall is mandatory and they need to keep it open at least the option is there to have the issue addressed.
This forum will be the first to know if I ever have a engine problem or any other problem. I would be honest with you there and would call it how It is. My biggest complaint with Hyundai Kia vehicles is they are hard on tires..

OT update: The kia dealer today had a car for about three hours they addressed the recalls and even texted me ( the advisor asked that was my preference) when it was finished - it was a very painless experience. It got a clean bill of health. They also did a standup job on the application of the rust proofing. I called the service advisor to ask if I should power wash the undercarriage and he told me absolutely so I did. There was no rot or rust to begin with so I felt good about them applying it. They did a chemical clean, cavity wax and rust proofing along with the software update for the knock sensor and srs system. 👍
 
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This is BITOG. There is as a matter of routine Hyundai and CVT hate. Many guys on here love the same flavor Kool-Aid.
No doubt... had I read about all the CVT hate before actually owning one I might have briefly reconsidered a bit, but reviews/opinions certainly vary and I rarely pay any attention to what others think/say. I will gladly say the only CVT I've owned has been flawless since day 1 and I don't miss any automatic or manual transmission I've ever had in any other vehicle before it and yes it's a Nissan!
 
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From the article. Makes no sense.

The problem: A component within the ABS system could short circuit and cause a fire. Neither automaker has yet determined the root cause of the problem.

The fix: Dealers will install new fuses in the affected vehicles’ ABS modules, free of charge, to mitigate the risk of a fire.

How perform corrective action if you don't know the root cause. Why will changing the fuse out mitigate the problem if they don't know the root cause.

Hopefully, no one was injured.
I vaguely remember hearing/reading it might have something to do with igniting brake fluid. But could be wrong. I'm sure a deep enough Google search would tell if my memory is correct or not.
 
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If this is true that's a good point. I for one, am not ready to own a Hyundai / Kia product yet as they are STILL having engine issues. Many love them and have good service though.
I was there between an Elantra and Corolla. Corolla ended up being more expensive, but I can also park it near a building without feeling negligent.
 
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HYUNDAI currently has 4 separate recalls for major fire concerns. That is a bit scary folks.

1) The Theta II rod bearing failure fires. Don’t believe me? Hyundai has a demonstration video on its website showing how a failed bearing can cause the piston rod to shoot out the block, causing a fire. YouTube is littered with videos. Just recently on the Hyundai forums someone just had this happen.

2) GDI HPFP fitting leakage fires. This has spanned across numerous model years, numerous models, and numerous engine families. Yes, even MY2021 vehicles have been recalled for this, as soon as they leave the factory.

3) ABS module fires. This has been ongoing for a couple years now, affects a staggering amount of vehicles now and apparently growing.

4) Catalytic converter fires. Hyundai/Kia installed flawed ECU tuning on many Gamma engine equipped vehicles. Under heavy load the catalytic converter is over worked and can cause a fire.

There you have it. FOUR SEPARATE recalls for fires. I really do hope Hyundai starts trending in the right direction. As a reminder I have a 2018 Hyundai Sonata purchased new, so I do want the company to be successful.
As my older wiser tech of 38 years I currently work with days. “KIA: 💩💩💩💩 in America”.
 
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I’ve learnt it 20Y back, stay away from Hyundai and KIA; apparently, nothing has changed much
 

CKN

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Have to put things in to context. I have a memory for things in the past-it's near term memory I sometimes have issues with......

(FORD)
  • The seal inside the switch that is suppose to separate the hydraulic and electrical sides of the switch fails by allowing brake fluid to leak from the hydraulic side of the switch into the electrical side of the switch. Once the leak develops, the brake fluid makes its way into the electrical cavity of the switch and can make contact with the electrically charged wires in the switch;
  • The switch is mounted in a vertically up or angled down orientation, allowing metallic corrosion products to settle in such a way that dendrite growth can develop which can promote the development of a short circuit;
  • The switch always had electrical power supplied to it even when the vehicle’s ignition was off, providing a source to produce the energy to start heating any of the switch’s components;


 
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Who wants to own something that you are always wondering if and when it’s going to die and balance it against the time left on the warranty . Factor in the 🤮trade in valve and it’s a classic case of “ You get what you pay for” If you like them folks have at it . There’s plenty of them to go around.
My big advice having been there done that is Buy New And Keep Trading . If you are one of those guys as I was for 40 years who picked mine up at around 100 ,000 and kept them up look elsewhere like Toyota / Honda. Otherwise as Clint Eastwoods movie line said “ Are ya feeling LUCKY today?”
 
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