Hot OSB?

Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
9,354
Location
Illinois
Earlier tonight, I was out at Menard's (Midwest based Home Improvement store) getting some sheets of 7/16" OSB for a project. Went to the stack, and there was a unopened bundle of OSB... Great! Good shape, no corners chipped off, clean and dry. Just what I wanted. So, I pulled off a few sheets, and it is warm to the touch. Huh? I lay my hands on the stack, where I just pulled the sheets off. Warm... like it has been in an oven. The warmth is radiating off of it. How? I looked at the date code on the sticker.... 11/19/2014 - 3rd shift. This OSB was made Wednesday night (like 72 hours ago), it was in my local store already... and the bundle was still warm on the inside. I've never seen anything like that before.
 
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Messages
43,672
Location
'Stralia
I commissioned an MDF (Medium Density Fibreboard) plant back in the late 90s...the glue and the board are "cooked" in a belt press, and emerge at a couple hundred Fs...then go through a "star cooler", which holds them in ambient air for a little while (minutes) to lose the initial temps, then they are packed and strapped...and still pretty toasty. Never thought of the distribution time that you are talking but now that I do, I'm not surprised at the heat. Likely still offgassing resin (formaldehyde at the factory I commissioned) too at this point.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
Messages
47,050
Location
New Jersey
Interesting. That stuff is pretty dense and belted pretty tightly together, so it makes decent sense if it was transported from someplace warmish and saw any sun. The other day I was in a restaurant, it was maybe 41 degrees outside and 65 inside. I was sitting at the window, and the furniture was pretty blocky, rustic wood furniture. It was getting mid-afternoon NE sunshine - so sun beams but not very good ones... The table was pleasantly warm and radiating heat. So no doubt this stuff would too...
 
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Messages
43,672
Location
'Stralia
JHZR2...that's one of the interesting things about this district, occasionally you enter a house heated by distributed hot water, heated by coal 24/7. The walls, floor, funriture and everything are at a constant temperature...it's noting like going to bed, then heating the house during the day where every surface is "cool"...was in a house a few weeks ago, near freezing outside, and the sandstone interior walls were amazingly "comfortable" to be near, or lean against.
 
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