dedicated drying towel worth the money?

Messages
3,746
Location
Cali
Meguiars Water Magnet waffle weaves work great for me, have about a dozen new and used. cheers

MEG-X2000-water-magnet-microfiber-drying-towel.jpg
 
Messages
4,993
Location
Ohio
Originally Posted by WhyMe
Been using old bath towels for years . they are getting worn out. thinking of splurging and getting a dedicated drying towel. they are not cheap though. recommend me one.
I have been using the same one for years. I think it is made by Howard Johnson.
 
Messages
3,346
Location
North TX
When I detailed for a living I used a gas engine leaf blower to blow the wash water off of the car and out of the crevices/mirrors/etc. Once done a standard 16X16 microfiber towel dobbed up the few drops remaining. I saw no need for a dedicated drying towel at that time. An electric blower would do the same thing. Just my take on it.
 
Messages
4,253
Location
Michigan
If you have an Ollies outlet store nearby, you can score some sweet deals on good towels there. I picked up a 26x30" THICK microfiber towel labeled Simoniz that is identical to the Griot's towel. It worked great on my cars this week. I paid $4 for it.
 
Messages
16,399
Location
...
Originally Posted by RTexasF
When I detailed for a living I used a gas engine leaf blower to blow the wash water off of the car and out of the crevices/mirrors/etc. Once done a standard 16X16 microfiber towel dobbed up the few drops remaining. I saw no need for a dedicated drying towel at that time. An electric blower would do the same thing. Just my take on it.
That would be another option and a faster one at that. Also as you mentioned, the blower takes care of the crevices and tight spots.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Messages
45,594
Location
New Jersey
I do use dedicated waffle weave microfiber drying towels. Work great, bought them years ago from pak shak... But ima,ways blow the car off first with an electric leaf blower. Only reason why I own an electric actually...
 
Messages
257
Location
Oklahoma
My towel experience. Used real chamois and spa quality Egyptian cotton towels for decades with no issues. Tried 7 different brands of microfiber towels. Some were cheap and some were expensive towels. I was never impressed with any of them. They seem to push water more than absorb anything at all. Then I thought about them. They are made from PLASTIC poly threads. Plastic as we know is non absorbent. Can't believe all the hype on them for some reason. Must be the new "towel of the week thing". slomo
 
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Messages
1,235
Location
Texas, USA
Originally Posted by slomo
My towel experience. Used real chamois and spa quality Egyptian cotton towels for decades with no issues. Tried 7 different brands of microfiber towels. Some were cheap and some were expensive towels. I was never impressed with any of them. They seem to push water more than absorb anything at all. Then I thought about them. They are made from PLASTIC poly threads. Plastic as we know is non absorbent. Can't believe all the hype on them for some reason. Must be the new "towel of the week thing". slomo
It's really not a 'thing'. I used high quality cotton towels for years, and always had hairline scratches to contend with. No matter how soft they felt to the touch, they would still scratch the clear coat, and I'd have to get out the orbital & correct it. The array of microfibers I use don't scratch nearly as much, although the cheapies from WalMart, as they age, can scratch. That's when they get relegated to wheel & glass duty. I do get what you're saying about absorbency, and you do have to be more patient with them, as they only become effective dryers once they've absorbed a little moisture. When they're completely dry, they can push the water around until they get moist. But I wouldn't trade them for all the cotton towels on earth, as I spend a lot less time using that orbital.
 
Messages
799
Location
Under the hood
Originally Posted by MrHorspwer
Chemical Guy's Wooly Mammoth is my current fav. It is giant (36x25), which makes it pretty heavy when wet and a bear to wring out, but it holds a ton of water. Waffle weave is great for drying glass.
I have something similar, that I got from Costco years ago, of all places. It's probably somewhere ~1/4" thick. Came in a bundle with a wash mitt. I don't know what happened to their buyers, but Costco used to actually source a lot of good stuff for their auto department, but it's been mediocre if not crappy for years since. It absorbs and holds more water than my chamois ever did, and yes, it gets heavy and your hands get a workout when wringing it out. The right type of microfiber is key; I don't know why some sell thin waffle-weave glass towels with no nap as drying towels. The absolute worst drying towel I've tried is the one from P21S, which had so much friction, it was be hard to drag across the surface.
 
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