Co-workers....

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Jan 26, 2012
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Omaha, NE USA
Tomorrow I'm stuck re-training a guy that has worked for the company, in the exact same position, for over 5 years. He works a few months, goes on a leave of absence, then returns to be re-trained again every year for the entire 4+ years that I've worked there and every time he still continues to be outperformed by literally 90% or more of the department. Very little has changed over the years with our job or our systems and every time he comes back you'd swear it was genuinely his first day if you didn't know any better. I told my boss that the guy has worked here for 5 years and at this point he should be able to just catch up on his e-mails then get back into the swing of things and reach out on a case by case basis if he needs something. I'm all for helping people who are actually new and I certainly think they need an adjustment period before they are expected to perform at their best. That being said, there has to be a point in time where a company recognizes that if someone can't grasp the fundamentals and is incapable of performing at the expected levels, there is a time to move on and fill the position with someone who can. I'm generally very patient and have gotten numerous new and or underperforming employees up to speed but I think this person just flat out isn't cut out for the job. I don't want his incompetence to reflect poorly upon me. The best thing I can think of is to keep detailed records of all our interactions, the work we have done to try to get him up to speed, to show that he has clearly been given the proper expectations and resources, and hope that management finally comes to the same conclusion that I did. What would you guys do if you were in my position?
 

fisher83

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Is this person/position essential? Have you had a sit down with this employee? Have you been upstairs with your frustrations?
My direct manager seems to understand but his hands appear to be tied by upper management. The position is essential but the person is easily replaceable.
 
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I’d do pretty much what you plan, keep records, though I suspect you need not worry much about him reflecting poorly on you if the first 3 ties are not the charm.

I learned a long time ago in corporate America Unless you’re a manager or learning department, you can control you, you have to sleep with what you do and unless it’s illegal or a violation of policy you’re duty bound to report don’t concern yourself with coworkers. Same goes with what they tell you to do, unless it falls into the above, do it and to the best of your ability, might as well be happy about it cause all being unhappy about it will accomplish is you doing it while unhappy. Unless you’re prepared to quit.
 
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IMO, as long as you are getting a paycheck you should just continue to do your job. If management wants to keep this person and you have spoke your mind, it's outta your hands.
Good luck.
Exactly this. Why are you worried about his performance reflecting poorly on you? He seems like a bad egg and I'm sure everyone knows it. Train him as asked by your supervisor and let your supervisor know your thoughts.

We have a bad egg at my job. I think we're interviewing his replacement soon. It's a delicate situation. I assume they're hoping he quits once we hire his replacement.
 
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FMLA, that is how.
our company has 480 hrs of fmla, and we have a certain employee that is usually off three days a week(fmla for us require a minimal of 3 days off)
He has migraines and is ongoing testing. With two weeks of vacation every year, personal time off, FMLA, and doctors letters, I suggested he apply for long term disability if he runs out of time.
Additionally, if you're a full-time employee who works eight hours per day, 40-hours per week, you're eligible for 480 hours of FMLA within a 12-month period.

... is incapable of performing at the expected levels, there is a time to move on and fill the position with someone who can...
Seriously? That kind of talk will loose YOUR JOB. Air your grievances and move on. Working in an industrial environment, I can tell you there are "easy" jobs and there are stressful jobs. They all pay the same, so the smart ones get the easy jobs, while others get pounded with OT. If retraining is your job, then you will have to retrain as many times as it takes. and don't BS us with "expected levels", that is corporate ****. My focus is to be safe, follow instructions and, to have fun at work. I do not worry about hitting target as long as I fulfill my orders.
 
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fisher83

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Omaha, NE USA
FMLA, that is how.
our company has 480 hrs of fmla, and we have a certain employee that is usually off three days a week(fmla for us require a minimal of 3 days off)
He has migraines and is ongoing testing. With two weeks of vacation every year, personal time off, FMLA, and doctors letters, I suggested he apply for long term disability if he runs out of time.



Seriously? That kind of talk will loose YOUR JOB. Air your grievances and move on. Working in an industrial environment, I can tell you there are "easy" jobs and there are stressful jobs. They all pay the same, so the smart ones get the easy jobs, while others get pounded with OT. If retraining is your job, then you will have to retrain as many times as it takes. and don't BS us with "expected levels", that is corporate ****. My focus is to be safe, follow instructions and, to have fun at work. I do not worry about hitting target as long as I fulfill my
I wouldn't consider it corporate B.S. Every place that I've ever worked has laid out some form of minimum performance standards that people were expected to accomplish. I like the guy and think he could probably be an asset elsewhere in the company. He just isn't getting the job done where he is at. Everyone goes through our regular training programs. They've basically asked me (for no extra pay or job title change) to help them re-train people who are struggling. I've done so for most of my tenure with the company. Most of them were motivated but struggling and I was able to get them up to speed successfully. Maybe I'm wrong, but I think he's just milking this and taking the company for a ride. Time will tell, I guess.
 

SammyChevelleTypeS3

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Tomorrow I'm stuck re-training a guy that has worked for the company, in the exact same position, for over 5 years. He works a few months, goes on a leave of absence, then returns to be re-trained again every year for the entire 4+ years that I've worked there and every time he still continues to be outperformed by literally 90% or more of the department. Very little has changed over the years with our job or our systems and every time he comes back you'd swear it was genuinely his first day if you didn't know any better. I told my boss that the guy has worked here for 5 years and at this point he should be able to just catch up on his e-mails then get back into the swing of things and reach out on a case by case basis if he needs something. I'm all for helping people who are actually new and I certainly think they need an adjustment period before they are expected to perform at their best. That being said, there has to be a point in time where a company recognizes that if someone can't grasp the fundamentals and is incapable of performing at the expected levels, there is a time to move on and fill the position with someone who can. I'm generally very patient and have gotten numerous new and or underperforming employees up to speed but I think this person just flat out isn't cut out for the job. I don't want his incompetence to reflect poorly upon me. The best thing I can think of is to keep detailed records of all our interactions, the work we have done to try to get him up to speed, to show that he has clearly been given the proper expectations and resources, and hope that management finally comes to the same conclusion that I did. What would you guys do if you were in my position?
Document EVERYTHING.... even things you think nothing of. I been in charge of many production & maintenance crews as supervisor on and off for years on many jobs and job sites the last 25 years of my 42 years before retirement. You don't have iron clad documents and the words mean nothing. One unfortunate thing today.... depending on a host of factors beyond your control, EVEN the documents may do nothing. They WILL keep your good reputation in place as someone who knows not only what you were asked to do, but the documents will prove you care and are competent to follow thru with records even when not asked. Good luck. Workers like that usually do themselves in by the old "give an inch and they take a mile."
 
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Sounds like he is related to the owners or upper management some how.

Since the kid took over where I work he has been slowly bringing in siblings/spouses and putting them in management jobs. I'm ok with that but there are people that have been here a long time that are upset, thinking they were in line for those positions.
 
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I wouldn't consider it corporate B.S. Every place that I've ever worked has laid out some form of minimum performance standards that people were expected to accomplish.
Yes they do, the question is do they enforce it? We start a new program "looking for hazards" and of course you can't just report "no problem found" you got to find problems, give you an extra 5 minutes after break, not any problem but things that can cause harm to the flow of product, went through 30 min of training, and after six or so weeks NOBODY was doing this report..... and taking 15 minutes breaks when breaks are 10 minute breaks. lol

Work has made me a good BS'er, "everyone stop talking plant manager coming by!"
 
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