Can you recommend a good torque angle gauge

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363
Location
Va
I will need this initially for connecting rod bolts while under the vehicle. I'm sure I will use it for other tasks but will need it primarily right now for the rods. I keep seeing the OTC, but I don't mind spending a little for a higher quality gauge. I like the dial gauges since there's less to go wrong, but some digital gauges have great reviews. I never wanted to rely solely on a magnet mount digital gauge but I've never used one so I cannot base much on my thoughts. The thought of breaking a rod bolt when trying to change a bearing makes me want to spend a little on a quality gauge. All input appreciated.
 
Messages
882
Location
South Carolina
The OTC type dial guage will be fine as long as the anchor rod can seat properly to keep the guage from spinning. If not, it will be useless for that application.
 
Messages
2,363
Location
NY, NY
I've torque turned a ton of fasteners on Cat diesels LONG before automotive applications started calling for it. I have the Snap On dial one and while it works fine, I've found sometimes it just isn't practical to try and watch the dial while pulling on a four foot long 3/4" drive tool. I understand that auto apps will require less and probably be easier. I've never used an electronic one but I would think anything that makes a tone when the spec is reached would be convenient. What I started doing about twenty five years ago and still do is this... Each point on a six point nut is 60 degrees. After the initial torque, let's say 30 lb ft, a fastener may then require turning 120 degrees. I mark a corner of the nut on the nut and a spot on the iron two corners away. You then turn the nut until the paint marks line up. White paint pen works great for this. You need to lift the socket off the fastener to see it but you develop a feel for it and it becomes a faster operation. I recently installed a head on a John Deere generator in a soundproof enclosure and it was difficult because I had to get myself in over the head and monitor the turns while another person turned the wrench. An electronic tool would have been nice if I had to do this myself. Fortunately, this is more of a hobby for me now so I don't do this much any more.
 
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6,347
Location
Suburban Washington DC
You can't visualize swinging the wrench 90 or 180 degrees? I bought this Lisle model years ago but seemed like a hassle moving it from nut to nut even if there was room to use it, so haven't used it since. [Linked Image]
 
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2,759
Location
pa
a simple ink mark + your eyes work well. finishing up a timing belt kit install on my 1.8T audi TT, bolts were marked from the last dealer install + i will do similar with the new one time use motor mount bolts in the kit. worked on the 2 prior installs in my traded 1.8 T jetta.
 
Messages
38
Location
OK
I used to do as you except I used wite out correction fluid to mark the nut and the part and put a line on the socket so I did not need to remove the socket to see if the marks were lined up. Worked for Cat for many years doing it this way. Roy
 
Messages
25,805
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Originally Posted by atikovi
And don't the higher end torque wrenches have a torque angle function built in?
All the ones I see today that can do angles are electronic and not cheap for a quality unit, Snap on would be the best one for the money. It is not too expensive at about $600 and very good quality, the ones from Stahlwille (the Rolls Royce of torque tools) are well over 2 grand. I did see some mechanical ones from Tohnichi and Stahlwille years ago that were a dial type but don't know much about them, they are not made anymore AFAIK. These are definitely not shade tree tools.
 

i6pwr

Thread starter
Messages
363
Location
Va
Originally Posted by atikovi
You can't visualize swinging the wrench 90 or 180 degrees?
Yes indeed....lol, but the angle I'm after is 110 deg so kinda the last 3rd of the angle between 90 and 120. Marking the bolt is a good idea, I think I can get 110 deg with careful measurent...but will look for a gauge.
 

i6pwr

Thread starter
Messages
363
Location
Va
Originally Posted by atikovi
Find it hard to believe a 10 degree difference between 110 or 120 is going to make or break a fastener.
I agree, and I believe it's better to go slightly higher than lower but I have no idea where the threshold is. The fact the motor is still in the vehicle and I'm on my back....I'm just going for spec to reduce any chance of something going bad. But again, to agree with you, Im sure there's enough allowance in regards to a few degrees.
 
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1,774
Location
RI
How much do you want to spend? Snap on has a torque wrench with the feature built in, and allows to you ratchet and retains the angle prior to ratcheting. I use it on a daily basis but I also do build a lot of engines
 

i6pwr

Thread starter
Messages
363
Location
Va
Originally Posted by mattd
How much do you want to spend? Snap on has a torque wrench with the feature built in, and allows to you ratchet and retains the angle prior to ratcheting. I use it on a daily basis but I also do build a lot of engines
Slightly out of budget, but I've seen a few refurbs go for around $300...tough call. I did glance over it a few days ago....but now it looks appealing....albeit pricey. If I didn't already have this PI wrench it would be even more tempting. Precision Instruments 40-250 ft.lb The Snap-On is really nice.....not sure which version does what, seems to be 4 different versions of the 1/2" TechAngle.
 

i6pwr

Thread starter
Messages
363
Location
Va
Thanks for the links. The Kobalt seems to have many good reviews, also apparantly made by Eclatorq. I wasn't aware of the numerous applications of TTY bolts in newer motors, would have re-thought my last torque wrench purchase. I figured head bolts but not rod bolts, least the rod bolts aren't as stretched as head bolts but still make me slightly nervous.
 
Messages
25,805
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Not just on engines anymore, TTY bolts are being used more and more over the last 20 years. Euro manufacturers use them in many places all over the car as well as standard bolts and US manufactures are sure to follow.
 
Messages
64
Location
Upstate NY
I always marked the socket and made a reference mark on whatever I am working on not the bolt head. It is much easier to see the marks and how far you have to go to meet the angle requirement. We also often used an impact to make the turn as torques on larger fasteners can get quite high. Also just because there is is an angle to turn the fastener to does mean it is TTY. Many are simply Torque to turn and actually the vast majority of the ones I have worked on are not TTY.
 
Messages
3,326
Location
Idaho
Originally Posted by Trav
If bolt stretch and deformation is involved it is TTY not TTT. I have found them in all sorts of places other than engine internals, sub frames, engine cradles, engine mounts, transmission and starter bolts, seat rail bolts, etc. Never use an impact on a TTY fastener...
When tightening to a certain angle (after an initial tightening to a low torque value), is this supposed to be done in one smooth motion?
 
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